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Annenberg Courses

An important contribution to the Center's efforts is the provision of internationally themed courses to Annenberg students.

Fall 2013
The Internet, State Power, and Free Expression: Media Policy Evolution in a Global Context
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Mondays, 11am- 1pm
Description

Global Internet policy is a zone of contestation, with states, corporations, civil society, and "netizens" seeking to assert particular perspectives.  This course studies processes and rhetoric of Internet policy-making.  It seeks to identify the major competing positions and the structures in key countries charged with projecting and obtaining global consensus. Among the concepts to be analyzed in this context are "sovereignty," "Internet freedom," "multi-stakeholder involvement," and the growing role of cybersecurity. There will be treatment of Internet law, the WCIT meetings in Dubai in 2012 and its predecessors, and on approaches to Internet policy in US, China and Brazil, Russia and India. We shall explore the relationship between national policy making and global consequences. The course is, thus, about the interrelationship between policy making at the national level and the making of “global Internet policy.”  One phase of the course involves examining the shaping of NGOs at the national level and their interplay with transnational counterparts.

Fall 2012
COMM 703/LAW 914 International Communication: Power and Flow
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Mondays, 3:30-5:30 pm
Description

This couse will address old and new patterns of communications flow across national and societal borders, taking account of media technologies, mutual perceptions, rhetorical forms, and the balance of power and influence in a globalizing world. 

Spring 2012
COMM 705 Institutions of New Media Technologies: Policy Evolution in a Global Context
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Tuesdays, 10 am-12 pm
Description

This course looks at the development of law and policy for the Internet by examining the myriad of institutions—NGOs, legislative initiatives, implementing entities, academic experiments—all surrounding the new media technologies and helping to define them. The range of institutions will span Citizens Lab (an entity that tracks and comments on blocking and filtering practices), the Oxford Internet Institute (organizing Internet studies in an academic context), ICANN (the great experiment in a hybrid innovation setting domain names, and elements of governments charged with pushing for particular visions of the Internet. Our study of output—policy and law—will come through examination of this set of institutions. We will establish a framework to describe such institutions and evaluate them. Each student will select one such institution and write about it—considering organization, sponsorship, funding, definition of purpose, productivity in order to capture the dynamics of policy developments across technologies and across societies.

The seminar will draw on the work of the Center for Global Communication Studies, using case studies from Europe, China, India, the US and elsewhere. The course starts from the premise that the policies that govern the new technologies are significant societal artifacts embedding distinct values, patterns and processes of control in relation to mediation, freedom of expression and access to information. They are the result of forces—institutional, technical and cultural—acting toward a particular notion of social order. Media laws and policies are signposts concerning commitments to democratic aspirations, to ideas of identity and to symbols of a society's cohesion.

During the first few classes, the range of possible institutional settings will be discussed, and the assignments may change to reflect the entities that become the focus for the class.

 

 

Fall 2011
COMM 703 International Communication: Power and Flow
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Tuesdays, 2-4pm
Description

This class deals with basic questions about the relationship of the state to the flow of words and images within its boundaries. Starting with a discussion of two somewhat competing paradigms — the paradigm of free expression and the paradigm of national identity, conflict management, and sovereignty.  We will discuss approaching the issues of power and flow, relying in part on the 'market for loyalties' model. 

This class will explore how systems and influences affect distribution of images and messages (some version of power), and how those images and messages impact public opinion with implications for stability, democratic growth or other political forms (some version of flow).   This class deals with ways of comparing media systems and with the relationship between such systems and technological and political developments.

A central issue in the class—relating to institutional foundations and overall theories of speech—has to do with the efforts of one state to affect the media space or flow of images in another.  Much of the class then relates to modes of applying or observing the working of these competing forces to shape allegiances.

Spring 2011
COMM609: Comparative Political Communication
Instructor Devra C. Moehler
Time Friday 2-4pm
Description

This course explores major themes in the study of political communication from a comparative perspective. It focuses on how communication affects political behavior, attitudes, and outcomes.  In doing so we will question how different political and social institutions shape individual-level communication effects.  We also examine the roles of mass media and interpersonal communication under different regime types and economic systems.  Finally we also ask how media systems are influenced by political institutions. 

For each topic we will critically examine the working hypotheses, methods, and evidence. The class is designed to provide a greater understanding of comparative political communication theories, as well as to develop social science reasoning and methodology. The readings, class discussions, and assignments will move back and forth between theories, empirical evidence, and public policies. 

The seminar will require active student participation in class discussions.  The discussions will focus on the assigned readings for the week, but students are encouraged to discuss additional works that are relevant.  Students must also write an original research paper, which can hopefully become a published article.  The course readings include every major region, but students are free to choose a geographic focus for their research paper.

COMM464: International Communication
Instructor Monroe Price
Time Wednesday 2-5pm
Description

This course will examine trends in international and transnational communications.  In an era of satellites and the Internet, traditional ways of thinking about the relationship of the state to the circulation of images and ideas are altering in important ways.  In the course we look at questions of state sovereignty, the rise of new information powers and shifting modes of thinking about media and power.  The course will deal with media in conflict zones, public diplomacy, international broadcasting, competing ideas of structuring the Internet, and changes and pressures on international norms of free expression.


Books: 

International Communication, A Reader, Daya Kishan Thussu
Media and Sovereignty, Monroe Price

Fall 2010
COMM 703: International Communication: Power and Flow
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Thursday 3:30-5:30pm
Description In this class, we look—through the prism of "strategic communication"—towards a novel approach to transnational information flows.

We will be interested in how systems and influences affect distribution of images and messages (some version of power), and how those images and messages impact public opinion with implications for stability, democratic growth or other political forms (some version of flow). 

This class deals with ways of comparing media systems and with the relationship between such systems and technological and political developments. We shall take advantage of various events in the life of the Center for Global Communications Studies and visitors to the Center and adjust the syllabus accordingly.  One project during the term will be helping to develop what our Center is calling an “information ecologies diagnostic,”  a way of looking at information flows within particular conflict-prone or otherwise interesting societies.  We'll be working with a manuscript project on strategic communication and free expression and, each week, we'll review recent developments as gathered through BBC Monitoring World Media and other sources.
COMM 721: Theory and History in Global Communication
Instructor Marwan M. Kraidy
Time Thursday 1:30-3:30pm
Description For more than a half century, global communication theory has been shaped by interaction between worldwide geopolitical developments on the one hand, and theoretical trends in the social sciences and humanities on the other hand.

This course is designed to give you a firm grasp of the historical trajectory of global communication theory and to develop knowledge of the central debates that have animated the field since the mid-20th century. We will discuss how these debates have changed, under what circumstances, and how contemporary scholarship wrestles with them; and how language and jargon in the field has shifted from “international” to “global.” We will also explore why some key issues and media have received relatively scant attention in global communication research, while others have arguably been over-emphasized. We will read a mixture of primary sources by luminaries in the different paradigms that have dominated global communication, complemented with secondary texts that are carefully selected to give you a sense of the architecture of the field, an understanding of what sub-areas of global communication scholarship are published and the journals and presses that publish in those sub-areas.
Spring 2010
COMM 485: Globalization and the Music Video
Instructor Marwan M. Kraidy
Time Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:30
Location ASC 225
Description This undergraduate seminar focuses on the music video genre to explore topical and conceptual issues at the heart of the globalization of the media and cultural industries. After a formative period in North America and to a lesser extent in Western Europe, the music video migrated elsewhere in the 1990s as a wave of privatization and liberalization engulfed media institutions worldwide. Based on a variety of scholarly and trade readings about the globalization of media and culture and the music video genre itself, and grounding the discussion mainly in a comparative analysis of U.S. and Arab music videos, this seminar will tackle the following questions: What changes when a media form migrates from its original context? What does the content of music videos reveal about socio-economic and cultural change worldwide? How do music videos express issues of gender and sexuality, commercialism, nationalism and religion? What transnational circuits of images and ideologies are enabled or constrained by music video? How are issues of identity and authenticity articulated in music videos worldwide?
COMM 702: Global and Comparative Media: Continuity and Change
Instructor Marwan M. Kraidy
Time Wednesdays, 1:30 - 3:30pm
Location ASC 223
Description

This graduate seminar has two objectives. The first is to familiarize you with the comparative approach to global and regional media systems. This entails reading key literature, grasping theoretical and epistemological issues, and understanding basic concepts. A more challenging but more exciting objective is theory construction through a critical engagement of the broad and ongoing debates about the future of the comparative approach in global media studies.

Going beyond the existing literature, we will discuss the following questions: To what extent are taxonomies developed in and about North America and Europe helpful in understanding media systems and institutions in other parts of the world? What challenges arise from using nation-states as units of analysis? What would happen to the model were we to adopt the transnational media institution operating on a global scale as a unit of analysis? How do new media like the Internet and mobile devices compel a rethinking of comparative media research? How does the emergence of regional, multi-national, sometimes language-based media spheres (pan-Arab, pan-Chinese, Post-Soviet, Latin American etc) challenge the comparative systems approach? Do we need to add a fourth model to the “liberal,” “social-democratic,” and “polarized-pluralist,” or is a more systemic, fundamental, revision of the comparative media method necessary? To what extent does the advent of globalization as a framework for global communication theory and research compel a rethinking of the comparative systems approach?

COMM 703: International Communication: Power and Flow
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Tuesdays, 2-4pm
Description

This class seeks to look—through the prism of "strategic communication"—towards a novel approach to transnational information flows.

It is interested in how systems and influences affect distribution of images and messages (some version of power), and how those images and messages impact public opinion with implications for stability, democratic growth or other political forms (some version of flow).  

This class deals with ways of comparing media systems and with the relationship between such systems and technological and political developments.  The structure of the course is as follows:  a kind of backbone will be Hallin and Mancini and similar taxonomies.  We'll be working with a manuscript project on strategic communication and free expression and, each week, we'll review recent developments as gathered through BBC Monitoring World Media and other sources. We shall take advantage of various events in the life of the Center for Global Communications Studies and visitors to the Center and adjust the syllabus accordingly; a couple of class slots are left open for this purpose.

Fall 2009
COMM 803: Shaping Communication Policy
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Tuesdays, 4:30 - 6:30pm
Location TBA
Description In this class, we look—through the prism of "strategic communication"—at the configuration of media systems domestically, how such systems evolve in terms and the interrelationship between a media system and external influences.  We will be interested in how these systems and influences  affect distribution of images and messages (some version of power); and how those images and messages impact on public opinion with implications for stability, democratic growth or other political forms (some version of flow).   This class deals with ways of comparing media systems and with the relationship between such systems and technological and political developments.  The structure of the course is as follows:  a kind of backbone will be Hallin and Mancini and similar taxonomies, such as Siebert et al. (Four Theories).  We'll be working with a manuscript project on strategic communication and free expression and, each week, we'll review recent developments as gathered through BBC Monitoring World Media. We shall take advantage of various events in the life of the Center for Global Communications Studies and visitors to the Center and adjust the syllabus accordingly.
COMM 817: Communication & Development
Instructor Devra C. Moehler
Time Wednesdays, 10:00 - 12:00pm
Description This course explores the role of communication in classic and current theories of political and economic development. It addresses the questions: What are the major hypotheses about the relationship between communication and development? How have our hypotheses about communication evolved over time in response to changes in prominent development theories, policy trends, and empirical evidence? What are the effects of different political and economic systems on media and communication and vice versa? How has the media been employed to facilitate socioeconomic development, good governance, and democratic development? To what extent are democracy and media assistance programs supported by theory and empirical evidence?

First, the course surveys major theories over the past 50 years about how states develop economically and politically focusing on the role of media, information, and communication as both causes and consequences of development. It considers how the theories shaped public policies and investigates the real-world and academic challenges that emerged. Second, the course examines some current communication and development issues including: media ownership and regulation, information and governance, local participation, media and regime type, voting and information, media effects during elections, media and conflict, international influences and media assistance programs.  For each topic we will critically examine the working hypotheses, methods, and evidence. The class is designed to provide a greater understanding of the communication challenges faced by developing countries, as well as to develop social science reasoning and methodology. The readings, class discussions, and assignments will move back and forth between theories, public policies, and empirical evidence.
COMM 821: Theory and History in Global Communication
Instructor Marwan M. Kraidy
Time Wednesdays, 1:30 - 3:30pm
Description For more than a half century, global communication theory has been shaped by interaction between worldwide geopolitical developments on the one hand, and theoretical trends in the social sciences and humanities on the other hand.

This course is designed to give you a firm grasp of the historical trajectory of global communication theory and to develop knowledge of the central debates that have animated the field since the mid-20th century. We will discuss how these debates have changed, under what circumstances, and how contemporary scholarship wrestles with them; and how language and jargon in the field has shifted from “international” to “global.” We will also explore why some key issues and media have received relatively scant attention in global communication research, while others have arguably been over-emphasized. We will read a mixture of primary sources by luminaries in the different paradigms that have dominated global communication, complemented with secondary texts that are carefully selected to give you a sense of the architecture of the field, an understanding of what sub-areas of global communication scholarship are published and the journals and presses that publish in those sub-areas.
Spring 2009
COMM 703: International Communication: Power and Flow
Instructor Monroe E. Price
Time Tuesdays, 4:30 - 6:30pm
Location ASC 108
Description This class deals with ways of comparing media systems and with the relationship between such systems and technological and political developments.  The structure of the course is as follows:  a kind of backbone will be Hallin and Mancini and similar taxonomies, such as Siebert et al. (Four Theories).  We'll be thinking of these theories with respect to European systems, and then extending this to consider non-western countries and current issues. The class will have several segments:  a) almost weekly, there will be a short discussion of current developments in media regulation from societies in conflict and in transition, as a way of exercising themes of the class;  b)  we shall be going through an analysis of ways of looking at communication as defined by Prof. Price in a book and papers under preparation; c) we shall take advantage of  visitors to the  Center for Global Communication Studies and projects of the Center that are related to strategic communication themes.
Spring 2008
COMM 445: Imagery, Media and Middle East Politics
Instructor Ibrahim Al-Marashi
Time Tuesday & Thursdays, 10:30am-12:00pm
Location ASC 412
Syllabus COMM 445 syllabus
Description This course examines the various media systems in Middle East countries, examining the Arab world, Israel, Iran and Turkey. Particular emphasis will focus on the roles of local media systems in national identity formation and the politic process within the Arab nations, Israel, Iran and Turkey. Special emphasis will deal with how locally produced media in these countries, respond and adapt to globalization in the region. Other questions that will be dealt with throughout the course include how do mass media produced in the region, such as Al-Jazeera, affect the perception and practice of Middle Eastern politics.  Furthermore we will discuss the interplay of the media, publics, Islam and the political process in the Middle East.  Middle Eastern news and entertainment media will be examined, including satellite TV, magazines, newspapers, motion pictures, internet, and alternative media. Other areas that will be covered include the role of gender, and pop culture in political communication in the region.   

Instructor Bio:

Dr. Ibrahim Al-Marashi is an assistant professor at Bahcesehir University, Faculty of Communication, where he teaches courses on media and the Middle East. He is also an adjunct instructor at Bogazici University's History Department, where he teaches courses on the modern history of Iraq, and Iran. He obtained his Dphil at University of Oxford, completing a thesis on the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, part of which was plagiarized by the British government in Feb. 2003 prior to the Iraq War. He is an Iraqi-American who lived at various times in Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Egypt and Morocco, and has travelled extensively through the Middle East. He will be a jointly hosted visiting scholar betwee the Middle East Center and CGCS.