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Past Events

May 2008
ICA 2008 Preconference: India and Communication Studies
Event/Type CGCS conference / symposium
Date May 20, 2008 - May 21, 2008
Time 13:00-17:15
Location Chicago, IL
Open to All welcome
Description

This preconference is organized by the Center for Global Communication Studies, Annenberg School for Communication, University for Pennsylvania, and Center for Culture, Media & Governance, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi.

Organizers:

  • Monroe E. Price, Director, Center for Global Communication Studies, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania
  • Aswin Punathambekar, Assistant Professor, Communication Studies, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Radhika Parameswaran, Associate Professor, School of Journalism, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Biswajt Das, Director, Center for Culture, Media & Governance, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi

Overview:

India and Communications Studies is a pre-conference that marks several important milestones:  the increasing interest in graduate programs in media studies and communications and culture studies in India; the extraordinary importance of India in the global production of culture; the role that India is playing in processes of globalization and communications technology; and the increased importance of media research about India among scholars in the ICA.   This pre-conference is designed to highlight all these developments and provide a venue to create a new coherence and a new salience for this subject.  Goals of this pre-conference include: creating partnerships, research opportunities and to provide greater awareness of the impact of India on global pathways.  An additional outcome of this pre-conference is to create a platform for forming an ICA-IAMCR network of scholars dedicated to understanding, researching, and advancing communications studies in and about India. The pre-conference arises out of work between scholars from the US and Europe, on the one hand, and scholars and programs in India. 

May 2009
2009 Chinese Internet Research Conference
Event/Type Annenberg School For Communication
Date May 27, 2009 - May 27, 2009
Time 9:00-18:00
Location Annenberg School For Communication
Open to All welcome
Ticketing Free but RSVP to Christy Nickles
Description

The 7th Chinese Internet Research Conference will take place at the Annenberg School for Communication on Wednesday May 27 through Friday, May 29, 2009.

The conference title is:
The Chinese Internet and Civil Society:
Civic Engagement, Deliberation and Culture

By the end of June 2008, China had reached 253 million Internet users, surpassing the United States and becoming the country with the largest number of netizens. The theme of the 7th Chinese Internet Research Conference, "The Chinese Internet and Civil Society: Civic Engagement, Deliberation and Culture," is designed to bring together scholars and professionals to examine the Chinese Internet from socioeconomic, political and cultural perspectives and explore uncharted areas in innovative ways. While much of the research so far has focused on the political implications of the Internet in China, we have yet to understand the changes the Internet is fostering in civil society, the intersection between the market and the state, and the Internet's cultural implications for identity formation, emergent cultural phenomena and social networking.  Topics of the conference include but are not limited to the following:

  • Civil society and its obstacles
  • The Internet and youth
  • The Internet, national crisis and media events
  • Entertainment, deliberation/opinion-formation and popular culture
  • Chinese minorities, China Proper, Greater China or "Cultural China":
  • Research methodology

We welcome proposals of quantitative, qualitative and critical studies from all disciplines. English proposal are preferred, but Chinese proposals will also be carefully considered. Invited papers will build upon the conference theme or address other significant issues regarding Internet development, use, and impacts in China and the Chinese-speaking world.

A proposal of approximately 1000 words is due by Jan. 15, 2009. Submissions should be sent to Dr. Hongmei Li and Sylvie Beauvais at PennCirc2009@asc.upenn.edu.  Accepted papers will be announced on February 15, 2009. Completed papers should be submitted by April 24, 2009.

July 2009
Webinar on Journalism, New Technologies and Media Development
Event/Type Webinar
Date July 14, 2009 - July 14, 2009
Time 10:00 am EST
Location Online -- website TBA
Description

The Transformation of News in the Digital Age: an interactive, live conversation between scholars and practitioners

Tuesday July 14, 2009, 3 pm GMT/10 am EST

Organized by the Center for Media and Communication Studies at Central European University and the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.

Recent events across the globe underscore the dramatic changes in ways people communicate with each other. Traditional boundaries and cultural mores are tested as new media augment the information landscape and challenge prevailing orthodoxies. Old institutions are threatened as broadcast entities and newspapers lose primacy.  Questions abound about a Twitter generation, a Facebook society and a world in which mobile telephony becomes a more and more significant platform for the diffusion of news.  Are these concerns overblown?  What are some of the implications for existing entities, for governments, for civil society, for media development agencies and funders? 

The interactive session will feature live in conversation James Deane, director of policy for the BBC World Service Trust; Persephone Miel, Senior Advisor, Internews, and a fellow with the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University; and practitioners, researchers, and journalists in media development from Bangladesh, Palestine, South Africa, El Salvador and across Central and Eastern Europe.

The online seminar will be streamed live from Budapest at the headquarters of Magyar Telekom with an ongoing, interactive live chat supplementing the live session. 

The Fifth Annual (2009) Annenberg-Oxford Summer Institute on Global Media Policy: Technology and New
Speaker TBA
Event/Type Intensive Summer Study Program
Date July 15, 2009 - July 17, 2009
Location University of Oxford
Open to Annenberg-Oxford Summer Institute Students
Description

The 2009 Annenberg Oxford Summer Institute will be hosted at University of Oxford, July 5-17, 2009.

  • 2009 Application
  • The schedule is being developed but topics covered will be similar to the 2008 program
  • It may also be helpful to review the 2008 Student and Faculty info
  • 2008 Institute website

The annual Institute brings together young scholars and regulators from around the world to discuss important recent trends in technology and its influence on information policy.  The sessions deal with recent problems in internet regulation and net neutrality, satellite delivery of information, emerging issues in the structuring of the mobile industry and its delivery of video.  Much of the time is devoted to new developments in comparative approaches to regulation, looking at Ofcom in the UK and other agencies, possibly including Hungary, Germany, the Middle East and China.  In the past there have been sessions on freedom of information statutes, public diplomacy, media and economic and social development and the history of information transitions in the former Soviet Union.  The richness of the experience comes from exposure to a variety of speakers and from the discussions among participants themselves.  Last year, there were 27 participants from 16 different countries. 

The objective of the program is to help prepare, motivate, encourage and support students and practitioners who aspire to pursue a career in communications media, may it be in academia, business or in policy-related fields. Applications are welcomed from students and practitioners working in communications, media, law, policy, regulation, and technology.

A long-term goal of this program is to help broaden and expand the pool of talented young scholars committed to careers in media, law and other disciplines in our global network.

More than an intensive summer study program in media law and policy, the Annenberg Oxford Summer Institute is a way for students in different disciplines to be exposed to a group of their peers hailing from a variety of backgrounds bringing with them an array of life experiences.

August 2009
Media Regulation in the Era of Convergence
Event/Type Conference / symposium
Date August 2, 2009 - August 16, 2009
Location Chinese University of Communication, Beijing
Description Problems of media policy and regulation have never been so complex, or so interesting.  The rapid pace of technological and economic change has thrown the established models of all the media industries into crisis. The consequences of the digitization of different kinds of media content, and the existence of a common distribution technology in the shape of the Internet, are that previously distinct forms of media now have much more in common. The proliferation of new devices mean that content that was once available only at distinct times and specific places is now much more pervasive. News, for example, is no longer only to be found in newspapers and in special slots on TV: today it is also available online, on mobile phones, on buses and in taxis.

Leading scholars from China, Europe and US will lecture on the different strategies in policy and regulation in their own areas of expertise. The school will cover a wide range of media and very different kinds of societies with distinct regulatory traditions. Bringing these perspectives together means that a unique picture of the contemporary world situation will be one of the major outcomes of the school.

Sponsored by:
  • National Centre for Radio & Television Studies, Communication University of China
  • Communication and Media Research Institute, University of Westminster
  • School of Journalism and Communication, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania
For more information
September 2009
Iran Elections: A Discussion with Roger Cohen of the New York Times
Speaker Roger Cohen
Date September 29, 2009 - September 29, 2009
Time 7:00 - 9:00
Location Arts, Research and Culture House (3601 Locust Walk), Crest Auditorium
Description

A discussion with Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet and Monroe E. Price
September 29, 2009

From the New York Times: Roger Cohen joined The New York Times in 1990. He was a foreign correspondent for more than a decade before becoming acting Foreign Editor on September 11, 2001, and Foreign Editor six months later.  Since 2004 he has written a column for the Times-owned International Herald Tribune, first for the news pages and then, since 2007, for the Op-Ed page. In 2009 he was named a columnist of The New York Times.  Mr. Cohen has written Hearts Grown Brutal: Sagas of Sarajevo (Random House, 1998), an account of the wars of Yugoslavia's destruction, and Soldiers and Slaves: American POWs Trapped by the Nazis' Final Gamble (Alfred A. Knopf, 2005). He has also cowritten a biography of General Norman Schwarzkopf, In the Eye of the Storm (Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1991). 

To read Roger Cohen's recent article on Iran in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, click here.

Discussants: Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, History, University of Pennsylvania and Monroe Price, Director of the Center for Global Communication Studies, Annenberg School

This event is co-sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania's Middle East Center.


October 2009
Democracy Promotion Under Obama: The Complexities of Reengagement
Speaker Thomas Carothers, Vice President for Studies, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Event/Type Talk
Date October 14, 2009 - October 14, 2009
Time 6:00 - 8:00pm
Location ASC 109
Description

A discussion with Thomas Carothers, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
October 14, 2009

Among the many foreign policy challenges President Obama inherited from his predecessor, restoring the credibility of U.S. democracy promotion is one of the most complex.  What have the new president and his foreign policy team done so far on this front?  What opportunities exist for U.S. democracy promotion in a world where democratic retreat is as common as democratic advance? Can a new line on democracy be reconciled with the broader Obama policy of diplomatic reengagement, which entails reaching out to undemocratic regimes, like those in Russia and Iran?

Thomas Carothers is vice president for studies and director of the Democracy and Rule of Law Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, based in Washington, D.C.  Widely recognized as a leading international authority on democracy promotion, Mr. Carothers has worked on democracy assistance projects for many public and private organizations and carried out extensive field research on democracy-building programs around the world.  He is the author or editor of eight books on democracy and rule of law promotion, including most recently Confronting the Weakest Link: Aiding Political Parties in New Democracies (2006) and Promoting the Rule of Law Abroad: In Search of Knowledge (2006), as well as many articles in prominent journals and newspapers.  He has previously worked as an attorney at Arnold & Porter in Washington and at the Office of the Legal Adviser of the U.S. Department of State.  He is a graduate of Harvard Law School, the London School of Economics, and Harvard College.

November 2009
Re-thinking Arab News Media Systems: CGCS lunchtime discussion
Speaker Augusto Valeriani
Date November 18, 2009 - November 18, 2009
Time 12:00 p.m.
Location ASC 300
Description

Re-thinking Arab News Media Systems: Between National Environment, Transnational Dimensions and Hybridity

Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please RSVP to lmorgan@asc.upenn.edu.
 
Media scholarship has primarily focused on the regional and global dimension of the “satellite revolution” in Arab news, insisting on concepts such as the “pan-Arab public sphere” and “media pan-Arabism.” Taking Egypt as a case study, Valeriani will move from a “purely” pan-Arab perspective to a broader approach that examines the complex relationship between pan-Arab satellite news media and national media systems. Through a discussion of journalists’ representations of their professional community, he investigates how far the coverage and practices of pan-Arab all-news broadcasters have blurred the borders of national media systems, creating new hybrid spaces.
 
Augusto Valeriani (Phd) is a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in the department of Politics, Institution and History at the University of Bologna (Italy) where he lectures in Mass Media and International Politics.

December 2009
Discussion and Book Signing
Speaker Monroe E Price
Date December 2, 2009 - December 2, 2009
Time 6:00 p.m.
Location University of Pennsylvania Bookstore, 3601 Walnut Street, Philadelphia
Open to Everyone
Description Professor Price will be speaking at the University of Pennsylvania Bookstore on December 2, celebrating his new publication and further bringing to life many of his relatives and the experiences of his Viennese ancestors, as well as his journey through the years to reconnect with this past.  There will be a book signing with the author. Objects of Remembrance is a reflection on the power of American assimilation and opportunity in the face of persisting refugee realities. Like Isaac Bashevis Singer, Monroe Price recounts the continuing impact of European identities as families, cast from their homes by the rise of Hitler and the Third Reich, struggle to find their way in a new and challenging environment.

Price was born to a Jewish family in Vienna in 1938 and left when he was seven months old. In a series of reflections, Price seeks to recreate the Vienna of his infancy and the socialization of his family, and other Jewish and Viennese immigrants, in the United States. As he traces the particular path of his own life, Price reveals a more universal story of adjustment, and the relationship between a marginal community and the drama of American citizenship.

“An intimate and provocative meditation on Jewish life between the old and the new world.” – Bernhard Schlink

The book is available for purchase on Amazon.com.

Photos, excerpts and event listings are available on Facebook.  Become a fan for exclusive excerpts and insights by the author.  

For those not on Facebook, please visit www.objectsofremembrance.com.
Book discussion with Monroe Price
Speaker Monroe Price
Date December 2, 2009 - December 2, 2009
Time 6 p.m.
Location University of Pennsylvania bookstore
Open to all
Description TONIGHT, December 2

University of Pennsylvania bookstore

6 - 7pm

Professor Price will be speaking at the University of Pennsylvania Bookstore on Dec. 2, celebrating his new publication, Objects of Remembrance, and further bringing to life many of the relatives and experiences of his Viennese ancestors, as well as his journey through the years to reconnect with this past.
March 2010
Milton Wolf Seminar
Event/Type Conference
Date March 17, 2010 - March 19, 2010
Location Vienna
Description Diplomatic Academy of Vienna
March 17 - 19, 2010

The 2010 Milton Wolf Seminar examines the implications of the changing news media environment for diplomacy.  It explores the widening array of newsmakers and stakeholders involved in setting the news agenda and the implications of their activities for diplomacy and foreign policy. 

The event is designed to bring together a diverse group of individuals representing multiple perspectives and nationalities.  Panelists will include distinguished print and television journalists, bloggers and social media specialists, NGO actors involved in media outreach, academics, and diplomats.  The finalized agenda is available here.

The program is being organized by the American Austrian Foundation and undertaken under the academic leadership of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna.

If you are in Vienna and interested in attending the conference, please contact Giulia Demattia at the American-Austrian foundation.
Roundtable with African Journalists on African Islam/Muslims
Event/Type Roundtable
Date March 23, 2010 - March 23, 2010
Time 1:30-4:30pm
Location Annenberg School Room 500
Description The round-table will include African journalists as well as American journalists who will discuss issues that pertain to media coverage of African Muslims in the US and how Islam and Islamism are addressed in the African media. This program is part of the African Studies Center's project on "Building Muslim Spaces in a Secular Society: The African Muslims in Philadelphia". This event is intended to enhance and facilitate discussion and understanding between the academic community and the African immigrant Muslim in greater Philadelphia on issues of Islam in the media.
International Media Law Moot Court Competition
Event/Type Moot Court Competition
Date March 24, 2010 - March 27, 2010
Location Oxford, UK
Description

Applications for 2010 competition now being accepted

The Price International Media Law Moot Court Competition is organized and facilitated by the Programme in Comparative Media Law & Policy at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford, part of the university's Faculty of Law, in collaboration with the International Media Lawyers Association (IMLA).

The competition has been held annually since 2008.

For more information and to apply, please visit the PCMLP website.

The purpose of the Price Moot Court Competition is to expand and stimulate an interest in Media Law and Policy among students from law and other disciplines, who will develop expertise in arguing a case before an international bench of judges from different legal systems and backgrounds.

The international nature of this competition encourages students to gain knowledge from legal systems different from their own by carrying out comparative study and research of regional and international standards to cultivate their arguments in both writing and oral forms.

Transnational Connections: Challenges and Opportunities for Political Communication
Event/Type Symposium
Date March 24, 2010 - March 25, 2010
Location IE University in Segovia, Spain
Description The Symposium, co-sponsored by the IE School of Communication at IE University and the Center for Global Communication Studies, aims to generate discussion on cutting-edge ideas in political communication, encourage international cooperation and unite scholars and practitioners.  More than forty international panelists, moderators and speakers will reflect on the state of the field, and discuss cutting-edge advances in theory, research and practice.

As a result of new geopolitical realities and intensified competition for global allegiances, long-held verities in political systems are being called into question. In this context, this conference’s efforts to broaden the scope of comparative political communication research beyond the United States, encourage international dialogue and collaboration, and increase the profile of European political communication research are timely and significant, and will yield invaluable benefits to the field of political communication in Europe and beyond.

Transnational Connections Symposium website
April 2010
CGCS Visiting Scholar Lunchtime Discussion: Sahana Udupa and Rob McMahon
Speaker Sahana Udupa and Rob McMahon
Date April 7, 2010 - April 7, 2010
Time 12:00 - 1:30pm
Location ASC 300
Description Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please RSVP to leisenach@asc.upenn.edu.

Sahana Udupa


Contested Local: Hyperlocalism and new-age Journalism in India

This talk explores the connections between the field of news production and articulations of ‘the local’ in post liberalization urban India. It extends Saskia Sassen’s emphasis on comprehending the concrete ways in which globalization imprints itself on local spaces. In this talk, Udupa will conceptualize these imprints as ‘mediatised’ and understand them by drawing on Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of the field of cultural production. She will argue that an enhanced coverage of local news in contemporary Indian news media has not resulted in a consensual mixing of global and local discourses, but has led to contests over the meaning of the local. The talk will explain the nature of these contests by using the media coverage of  the 'pink underpants campaign' as a case study.

Sahana Udupa is a doctoral candidate at National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore, India.  Her work explores the interface between the globalising city of Bangalore and the new news cultures that have emerged after 1990, with a broader goal of theorising the inter-relationship between contemporary journalistic practices and formation of publics.

Rob McMahon

Peace Journalism and the Analysis of Racial Conflict: Assessing the 'Dark past' and 'Hopeful future' in news coverage of racial reconciliation
by Rob McMahon and Prof. Peter Chow-White (Simon Fraser University, School of Communication)

In this paper McMahon and Professor Chow-White draw Peace Journalism theory to develop a model for analyzing media representations of ‘cold’ racial conflicts, and then use this model to examine an empirical case study of news discourse about reconciliation processes in British Columbia. They explore how Peace Journalism offers an alternative approach to analyzing news production practices, arguing that to capture representations of ‘cold’ racial conflict, the operationalization of Peace Journalism theory must be developed to incorporate both agenda-setting and framing theory, as reflected in a distinction between ‘Weak’ Peace Journalism and ‘Strong’ Peace Journalism. Second, they employ these theoretical arguments to build an evaluative model and test the model in an empirical case study of a recent broadsheet newspaper series.

Rob McMahon is a PhD candidate in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University. His research interests include journalism studies and normative media theory.
The Thaw: Visual Culture and Beyond
Event/Type Symposium
Date April 9, 2010 - April 9, 2010
Time 9:00am - 4:00pm
Location Max Kade Center, 3401 Walnut Street, Room 329A
Description Laughing Matters
Soviet Propaganda in Khrushchev's Thaw, 1956-1964


9:00 am  Breakfast

9:30 am - 10:30 am  Keynote Speech
"Socialism demagnetized: new approaches to the post- totalitarian Epoch of Soviet History,"
Benjamin Nathans (University of Pennsylvania)

11:00 am - 1:00 pm  Visual Culture
Chair: Christine Poggi (University of Pennsylvania)
Discussant: Kevin M.F. Platt (University of Pennsylvania)
  • "Deineka in the Thaw: 'The Artist of Modernity,'" Christina Kiaer (Northwestern University)
  • "Cold War Cartoons: Boris Efimov and the fate of Stalinist Culture in the Thaw," Stephen Norris (Miami University)
  • "Laughing Matters: Soviets Propaganda Posters in the Thaw,"
  • Masha Kowell and Liliana Milkova  (University of Pennsylvania and Oberlin College)
1:00 pm -  2:00 pm Lunch Break

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Beyond the Visual
Chair: Devin Fore (Princeton University)
Discussant: Liliane Weissberg (University of Pennsylvania)
  • "Designs of Spring: On the Natural Form of Developed Socialism," Robert Bird (University of Chicago)
  • Voluntarism and Coercion in Khrushchev's Communist Party," Edward Cohn (Grinnell College)
  • "Warhol in Kazakhstan," Richard Meyer  (University of Southern California)
For further information please visit the Slavic Languages Department.

Laughing Matters will be shown April 10 to June 27, 2010 at the Arthur Ross Gallery, University of Pennsylvania.
Curated by Liliana Milkova and Masha Galkina-Kowell
Monroe Price and Bernhard Schlink in Conversation
Event/Type Book Talk
Date April 15, 2010 - April 15, 2010
Time 7:00pm
Location 82nd Street Barnes & Noble, 2289 Broadway, NY, NY
Description CGCS director Monroe Price and Bernhard Schlink, author of The Reader, will discuss Price's revealing new memoir exploring assimilation, Objects of Remembrance: A Memoir of Viennese Dreams and American Opportunities.

For more details please visit barnesandnoble.com.
CGCS Visiting Scholar Lunchtime Discussion: Carlo Nardella and Oulai Bertrand Goué
Speaker Carlo Nardella and Oulai Bertrand Goué
Date April 22, 2010 - April 22, 2010
Time 12:00 - 1:30pm
Location ASC 300
Description Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-serve basis. Please RSVP to leisenach@asc.upenn.edu.

Carlo Nardella


The Most Original Sin: Religious Motifs in Italian Advertising

Increasingly, religious images, narrations and symbols are used by advertising to accomplish its commercial task, especially in Italy. This presentation examines how such religious motifs are depicted in Italian magazine advertising, leading to the proposal of a typology. Such advertisements make visible the crucial role of consumer culture in exploiting a symbolic capital which, even in a secularized context, is a vital part of an ancient heritage.

Carlo Nardella is a Ph.D student in Sociology in the Department of Social and Political Studies at the University of Milan, Italy.  His research lies at the intersection of religion and the media. He specializes in mass communication, sociology of religion and the interplay between media, religion and culture.

Oulai Bertrand Goué

The Ivorian Press and the Pursuit of Independence

The decriminalization of press offences in Côte d`Ivoire, in 2004, is a watershed moment for the Ivorian press in its quest for freedom of speech.  Different stakeholders praised the move for its capacity to revitalize the sector, strengthen journalists’ role and lead to an emergence of a diverse media landscape.  In the wake of this legislation, in 2007, a Fund for the Support and Development of the Press, a state-owned agency, was set to “participate in the development of the press” in financing the press at an amount of 2 billion Fcfa ($ 4.25 million).  At the same time, on October 22, 2009 Le Nouveau Réveil, a daily newspaper, was ordered to pay libel damages of 5 million Fcfa ($ 10,4000) to Prime Minister Guillaume Soro for a front-page story entitled "Soro talking nonsense after jaunt to China".  Furthermore, the same newspaper’s offices were ransacked by a group of students who latter turned on the newspaper’s staffers, to allegedly protest against a report on their Union.
These facts set the tone of a context of tensions for an Ivorian press aiming to pursue independence in a fledgling republic.  How is a media capable of reaching independence when it has to deal with political, economic and social pressure?  Goué intends to analyze the stakes for the Ivorian press in its wrestling to support itself in order to express its own diverse views, and contribute to the emerging democracy.

Oulai Bertrand Goué is a Ph.D. student at the Faculty of Communication at the University of Sorbonne Nouvelle in Paris, France. His research focuses on media ethics in a context of a civil war, and consists of a comparative study of the coverage that the Ivorian, French, British and U.S. press gave to the crisis in the Cote d'Ivoire from 2002 to 2007.
May 2010
CGCS Visiting Scholar Lunchtime Discussion: Carla Ganito
Speaker Carla Ganito
Date May 20, 2010 - May 20, 2010
Time 12:00 - 1:00pm
Location ASC 300
Description Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Please RSVP to leisenach@asc.upenn.edu by Tuesday, May 18 at 12pm.

One is not made, but rather becomes, a feminine mobile phone

In recent years, mobility has become the context of living and thus we also have to understand gender against that background.  If society is co-produced with technology, the gender effect cannot be ignored in the design, development, innovation and communication of technological products. What makes the mobile phone an interesting technology to study on the scope of gender is that contrary to other technologies, especially computers and the Internet, mobile phones are egalitarian; they have been adopted almost identically by men and women around the globe. Nevertheless egalitarian does not mean equal. Figures between men and women are similar but differences come out in qualitative usage, its purpose and nature, as well as in the discourse.

This talk will describe the preliminary results of Ganito's PhD research project: Women and Technology: Gendering the Mobile Phone.  Portugal is used as a case-study, that argues for a changing relation of women and technology and that becomes visible in the gendered uses and representations of the mobile phone. Although the study will take the Portuguese situation as a case in point, the framework of the dissertation will necessarily be linked to non-national developments.

The themes of the research are at the cross-roads of feminist studies, cultural studies, and new media.  It aims at building a feminist perspective into the debate around the social significance of the mobile phone thus overcoming the lack of studies that take into consideration the gendered nature of mobile communications. 

Carla Ganito is currently a PhD candidate in Communication Sciences at Portuguese Catholic University.  Read our Q&A with Carla, who explains how she became interested in gender and mobile phones, and the title of her presentation.
June 2010
Developing a Network of Scholars and an Agenda for Social Science Research on Cyber Security
Event/Type Workshop
Date June 7, 2010 - June 8, 2010
Time 9am - 5pm
Location Central European University, Budapest
Description Central European University, the Center for Media and Communication Studies at CEU, the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and the European Science Foundation present a two day workshop on cyber security.

Topics include:
  • Cyber Security in Europe
  • Establishing Trust: Attribution, Surveillance and Privacy
  • Protecting an Open Society: Information Law and Policy, Liabilities and Incentives
  • Comparing responses: State Responses, Models and Policy Transfer
Panelists include scholars and experts from around the world, including:
  • University of Leeds
  • New York University
  • Center for Military Studies, University of Copenhagen
  • NATO Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of Excellence
  • Institute for Information Law, Amsterdam
The schedule for the 2-day workshop is available here.

Andrea Servida's public presentation, Europe and the Global Information Society Revisited: Cyber Security in Europe will take place on June 7.  More information is available here.

Further details are available from the CEU website.
Symposium & Summer Institute for Health Communication Studies
Date June 27, 2010 - July 14, 2010
Location Beijing, China
Description Symposium
The Summer Institute will “kick off” on June 27 with a one-day symposium at Renmin University on health communication studies in the United States and China, with a focus on communicable disease. Participants in that event include Penn’s faculty, along with officials from the Chinese Ministry of Health; the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the Beijing Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and provincial CDCs; Chinese scholars and practitioners; and doctoral students.

The symposium overview and schedule is available here.

Summer Institute
A Summer Institute for Health Communication Studies will take place at Renmin University June 28 – July 14. During that time faculty from Annenberg will lead classroom sessions on a variety of health communication subjects. The participants will include junior faculty members and advanced graduate students from selected Chinese universities.
           
Several Penn faculty and researchers will participate, including Annenberg professors Joseph N. Cappella and Robert Hornik, and researcher Amy Jordan, who heads the Media and the Developing Child sector of the Annenberg Public Policy Center. Other participants from the U.S. include Michael Slater from Ohio State University and Xiaoquan Zhao from George Mason University. Dr. Zhao received his doctoral degree from Annenberg in 2005. Annenberg doctoral students Dina Shapiro and Rui Shi also will participate.
           
Penn faculty’s expertise will add greatly to the institute, with sessions covering topics such as:

  • What are health communication campaigns and when do they work,
  • Theories of attention, attitude and behavior change,
  • Case studies on anti-smoking and anti-drug campaigns,
  • The effects of entertainment narratives, and
  • The importance of child development theories for understanding the effects of media on youth.
The institute agenda is available here (updated June 16).
July 2010
The Politics and Economics of Media Convergence
Event/Type Joint Summer School
Date July 1, 2010 - July 15, 2010
Location Beijing, China
Description The Politics and Economics of Media Convergence Summer School website

Sponsored by:
  • National Centre for Radio & Television Studies, Communication University of China,
  • Communication and Media Research Institute, University of Westminster
  • School of Journalism and Communication, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania
This summer school will focus on the scholarly study to develop adequate frameworks for the convergent future. Leading scholars from China, Europe and US will lecture on the different strategies in policy and regulation in their own areas of expertise.  The school will cover a wide range of media and very different kinds of societies with distinct regulatory traditions.  Bringing these perspectives together means that a unique picture of the contemporary world situation will be one of the major outcomes of the school.

The School will take place at the Beijing Campus of the Chinese University of Communication (CUC), which will provide accommodation, catering and classrooms for all the participants.  The Campus is a modern one, located in the east of Beijing and well served by public transport.
There will be 10 days of lectures and seminars and ample time for informal meetings, leisure and tourism.  Formal teaching will consist of lectures and discussions by leading experts from different countries.  Students at the School will also be expected to present a paper on their own research specialization in one of a series of seminars devoted to work in progress.

A copy of the application form can be found here
All applications for the School will be handled by the staff of CUC and communications and completed forms should be sent to bjss2009@gmail.com. We welcome other materials, like a CV, a personal statement, a detailed research proposal or an academic paper, which will be helpful for the organisers to evaluate your application.
The deadline for applications is May 1, 2010. If you have any questions or requests, you can also contact us via email at the above address or by telephone or fax at 86-10-65779313 or 86-10-65779244.
Media, Democratization and International Development: Understanding and Implementing Monitoring and Evaluation Programs
Event/Type Workshop
Date July 5, 2010 - July 16, 2010
Location Central European University, Budapest
Open to Course students only
Description Central European University
Budapest
July 5 - 16, 2010

Media Development and Democratization website

This intensive summer course on media development and democratization is designed to help researchers from academia and civil society gain a better understanding of the history, theory, practice, current trends, and differing methodologies involved with the monitoring and evaluation of international aid programs and their impact, with a focus on the role of radio as a medium for development goals.

For more information and application details, please visit http://www.summer.ceu.hu/media.

Annenberg-Oxford Summer Institute 2010: Global Media Policy and New Themes in Media Regulation
Date July 5, 2010 - July 16, 2010
Location Oxford, UK
Description 2010 Annenberg-Oxford Summer Institute website

The Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania and the Programme of Communication Law and Policy at the University of Oxford (PCMLP) are pleased to announce the 12th annual Media Policy Summer School, to be held from July 5 - July 16, 2010.

The annual Institute brings together young scholars and regulators from around the world to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy.

This year there will be a significant focus on media regulation and strategic communication in crisis environments from Sudan to Somalia, to Iraq. There will be sessions on freedom of information, public diplomacy, media and economic and social development and the history of information transitions.

At the same time, the successful curriculum that has been the foundation of the institute over the years will continue, with sessions ranging from global issues of internet regulation to satellite delivery of information. Part of the course will be devoted to new developments in comparative approaches to regulation, looking at Ofcom in the UK and other agencies, including examples from the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

The seminar brings a wide range of participants from around the globe together and provides them with an environment in which significant policy issues are seriously discussed. The richness of the experience comes from exposure to a variety of speakers and from the discussions among participants themselves.

For more information please see last year's program.
October 2010
CGCS Visiting Scholar Lunchtime Discussion: Yonghua Zhang
Speaker Yonghua Zhang
Date October 14, 2010 - October 14, 2010
Time 12:00 - 1:00pm
Location ASC 300
Description

Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Please RSVP to leisenach@asc.upenn.edu by Tuesday, October 10 at 12pm.

This talk explores Internet development in Mainland China and a couple of applications/uses of the Internet in the country in domestic context of its endeavors in reform and opening towards the outside world and the broader, global context of globalization. It will start with a discussion of the Internet in China whitepaper issued by the Information Office of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China, sharing some of the key words and important points covered and offering some data and graphs to illustrate some aspects of the development. Then it will move on to discuss the use of the Internet in news dissemination along with the development of online media (media websites plus other websites/web pages and blog pages that engage in disseminating news online). Following that it will talk about blogging as a new form of public participation and the extension of public sphere/space in Mainland China. It is my sincere wish that this talk can do its bit in contributing to bringing in a Chinese individual’s understanding of the issue in the Chinese context.

Yonghua Zhang is a professor and chair of the Department of Journalism and Communication, School of Film and TV Art & Technology, and Director of the Center for International Communication Studies and Vice Director of the Film, TV and Media Research Institute, Shanghai University.

Islamically Marked Bodies and Neoliberal Locations in Egyptian Cinema
Speaker Walter Armbrust
Event/Type Lecture
Date October 20, 2010 - October 20, 2010
Time 5:00pm
Location 401 Fischer-Bennett Hall
Description

Walter Armbrust (University of Oxford, Middle East Studies)

The film Ana Mish Ma‘hum (I Am Not With Them, 2007) contrasts sharply with a set of visual codes salient since the early 1970s for depicting (or more to the point, eliding) Islamically marked people and urban places. These conventions were repeated across a broad swathe of audiovisual media, hence my case study applies not just to cinema, but to all visual media more broadly. In the past decade, however, conventions for representing people and locations have been altered significantly, first by the advent of transnational broadcasting, and secondly, by increasingly insistent links to the politics of neoliberalism. Hence my paper examines a tension evident in I Am Not With Them and other similar productions between on one hand, the neoliberalization of Islam, and on the other hand, agendas for infusing Islamic ethics into neoliberalism.

This program is made possible thanks to the generous support of Center for Global Communication Studies, Cinema Studies, Middle East Center, and Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania, in collaboration with the Historians of Islamic Art Association.

Internet Policy Lunch: Net Neutrality
Speaker Kevin Werbach
Date October 21, 2010 - October 21, 2010
Time 12:00 - 1:15pm
Location ASC 500
Description

Network Neutrality: The Real Story

Please RSVP by Tuesday, October 19 at 12pm.

No communications policy issue has generated more attention in recent years than network neutrality, the idea that broadband network operators should not discriminate in their treatment of Internet content or services.  Yet few have produced as much confusion.  With President Obama and his FCC Chairman expressing strong support for network neutrality, why has the issue fallen into a morass of uncertainty? How is the debate likely to play out over the coming months?  And what's really at stake here?  How is the outcome of the current controversy likely to shape the future of the Internet?  

Kevin Werbach, Associate Professor of Legal Studies at Wharton, co-led the review of the FCC for the Obama-Biden Transition Project, and has served as an expert advisor to both the FCC and National Telecommunications & Information Administration in the Obama Administration, as well as FCC Counsel for New Technology Policy in the Clinton Administration.

Webinar: Integrating Social Media into Journalism: Teaching and Practice
Date October 26, 2010 - October 26, 2010
Time 9:00 - 10:30am
Location Annenberg Hall at Temple University
Description

The United Nations Development Programme, in conjunction with the Institute of Technology and Communication of Erbil in Iraq and the Center for Global Communication Studies, are coordinating a live Skype Seminar on Oct. 26th at 9 a.m. from Annenberg Hall (2020 N. 13th St) at Temple University's School for Communication and Theater entitled  "Integrating Social Media into Journalism: Teaching and Practice."

The Webinar seeks to present methods for integrating new media/social media into curriculum and practice within an Iraqi context. The session will be approximately 90 minutes and will feature a discussion section that allows Temple University professors, as well as students, to ask and answer questions live from Erbil.

The discussants are:

1. Professor Susan Jacobson started her journalism career in the mid-1980s working for The New York Times on an experimental computer news service. She worked in the Internet industry for many years, and teaches many of the new media courses in the department, including Publishing to the Web and Experimental Journalism. Her research interests include the impact of new media on the practice of journalism and journalism education, new narrative forms created by new media, and the development of mobile media.

2. Associate Professor Christopher Harper, co-Director of the Multimedia Urban Reporting Lab worked for more than 20 years in journalism at the Associated Press (Chicago), Newsweek (Chicago, Washington and Beirut),ABC News (Cairo and Rome) and ABC 20/20. He teaches History of Journalism, International Reporting, Journalism and the Law and a variety of reporting courses. His research has focused on digital media, although his current work deals with the baby boomer generation.

3. Assistant Professor Shenid Bhayroo teaches courses in audio-visual newsgathering, broadcast journalism, and journalism and politics. He worked as an investigative journalist for the South African Broadcasting Corporation (public broadcaster) and covered South Africa's Truth & Reconciliation Commission hearings in the 1990s. He has also worked as a freelance journalist, producer, cameraperson, and video editor for foreign media in South Africa. His research focuses on the political economy of media. His current work examines ownership of news and information content and the commodification of online news.

November 2010
Internet Policy Lunch: Virtual Justice
Speaker Greg Lastowka
Date November 4, 2010 - November 4, 2010
Time 12:00 - 1:15pm
Location ASC 223
Description

Please RSVP by Tuesday, November 2.

Tens of millions of people today are living part of their life in a virtual world. In places like World of Warcraft, Second Life, and Free Realms, people are making friends, building communities, creating art,and making real money. Business is booming on the virtual frontier, as billions of dollars are paid in exchange for pixels on screens. But sometimes things go wrong. Virtual criminals defraud online communities in pursuit of real-world profits. People feel cheated when their avatars lose virtual property to wrongdoers. Increasingly, they turn to legal systems for solutions. But when your avatar has been robbed, what law is there to assist you?

In Virtual Justice (Yale University Press 2010), Greg Lastowka illustrates the real legal dilemmas posed by virtual worlds. Presenting the most recent lawsuits and controversies, he explains how governments are responding to the chaos on the cyberspace frontier. After an engaging overview of the history and business models of today's virtual worlds, he explores how laws of property, jurisdiction, crime, and copyright are being adapted to pave the path of virtual law.

Greg Lastowka is a Professor at Rutgers School of Law.  He teaches courses in the laws of property and intellectual property. He is an expert on Internet law and his opinions have been quoted in publications such as Nature, The Economist, Scientific American, and the New York Times.  He is a co-director of the Rutgers Institute for Information Policy & Law. 

Click here for NPR's On the Media interview with Greg Lastowka.

Not in Service: Strategies Among West Africans in Spain to Minimize Transnational Obligations in the Age of the Cell Phone
Speaker Ermitte St. Jacques
Date November 5, 2010 - November 5, 2010
Time 12 -1pm
Location ASC 300
Description

Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Please RSVP to leisenach@asc.upenn.edu by Wednesday, November 3 at 12pm.

Ermitte St. Jacques is a National Science Foundation Minority Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Annenberg School of Communication.

She recently received a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of Florida. Her dissertation research concerns the relationship between the economic integration of Senegalese and Gambian immigrants in Catalonia, Spain and their participation in transnational activities that enable them to maintain multiple social ties with their countries of origin. At CGCS/ASC Ermitte will examine the influence of new media and mobile communication technologies in the maintenance of transnational ties.

Elements of the 'New Arab Public Sphere': Young Jordanians in Cyberspace
Speaker Lucy Abbott
Date November 10, 2010 - November 10, 2010
Time 12 - 1pm
Location ASC 300
Description

Lunch will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Please RSVP to leisenach@asc.upenn.edu by Tuesday, November 8 at 12pm.

Lucy M. Abbott is a PhD candidate at the Centre for the Advanced Study of the Arab World (CASAW) at Durham University, U.K. and will be spending the Fall 2010 semester with CGCS. As part of her PhD training, she studied Arabic at the University of Edinburgh and Kalimat Language Centre in Cairo, Egypt. She holds a BA (Hons) in Modern European Languages and a Master’s in International Relations (Middle East), also from Durham.

Her research focuses on Arab countries’ contemporary experiences of mass media and politics from a theoretical perspective. Her PhD dissertation focuses on the role of transnational Arab satellite television as a non-state actor catalyzing or stifling public debate. Other research interests include critical media studies, cyberpolitics, media regulation and political theory.

December 2010
Internet Policy Lunch: Internet Architecture and Innovation
Speaker Barbara Van Schiewick
Date December 9, 2010 - December 9, 2010
Time 12:00 - 1:15pm
Location 641 Huntsman Hall
Description

Please RSVP by Tuesday, December 7.

Barbara van Schewick is an associate professor of law at Stanford Law School, an associate professor (by courtesy) of electrical engineering at Stanford’s Department of Electrical Engineering, and the faculty director of Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society. Her research focuses on the economic, regulatory, and strategic implications of communication networks. In particular, she explores how changes in the architecture of computer networks affect the economic environment for innovation and competition on the Internet, and how the law should react to these changes. This work has made her a leading expert on the issue of network neutrality. In 2007, van Schewick was one of three academics who, together with public interest groups, filed the petition that started the Federal Communications Commission’s network neutrality inquiry into Comcast’s blocking of BitTorrent and other peer-to-peer protocols. She has testified on issues of Internet architecture and network neutrality before the FCC in en banc hearings and official workshops. Her book Internet Architecture and Innovation was published by MIT Press this summer.

Evaluating the Impact of Media Interventions in Conflict Countries
Date December 13, 2010 - December 17, 2010
Location Caux, Switzerland
Description

The Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, the Broadcasting Board of Governors, Fondation Hirondelle, Internews Network, and the United States Institute of Peace are pleased to announce a gathering of experts to design guidelines for Evaluating the Impact of Media Interventions in Conflict Countries.

The meeting will take place at the Caux Conference Center near Geneva, Switzerland from December 13 — 17, 2010. This will be an unprecedented effort — convening the world’s leading methodologists, funders, and implementers for 5 days of intensive collaboration — in response to the growing demands from funders for monitoring and evaluation data.

For more information please click here.

January 2011
Internet Policy Lunch: A Discussion of Tim Wu’s The Master Switch (Part 1)
Date January 13, 2011 - January 13, 2011
Time 12 - 1:30pm
Location ASC 300
Description

A Discussion of Tim Wu’s The Master Switch led by Joe Turow and Peter Decherney

The first two meetings of the Internet and Media Policy lunchtime series will be devoted to an informal discussion of Tim Wu’s book, The Master Switch. The book surveys the history of American telecommunications and media industries. The discussion will focus on Wu’s methodology, his use of history, and his recommendations for the future.

On January 13th, we will discuss the chapters on the telephone system and the film and television industries (parts 1-4).

Faculty and graduate students from Penn and surrounding schools are encouraged to attend. Please RSVP and read the relevant chapters before each meeting. Lunch will be provided on a first come, first served basis.

Internet Policy Lunch: A Discussion of Tim Wu’s The Master Switch (Part 2)
Date January 20, 2011 - January 20, 2011
Time 12 - 1:30pm
Location ASC 300
Description

A Discussion of Tim Wu’s The Master Switch led by Joe Turow and Peter Decherney

The first two meetings of the Internet and Media Policy lunchtime series will be devoted to an informal discussion of Tim Wu’s book, The Master Switch. The book surveys the history of American telecommunications and media industries. The discussion will focus on Wu’s methodology, his use of history, and his recommendations for the future.

On the 20th, we will discuss the chapters on the internet (part 5). The book is widely available, and we will have section 5 available as a PDF on request.

Faculty and graduate students from Penn and surrounding schools are encouraged to attend. Please RSVP and read the relevant chapters before each meeting. Lunch will be provided on a first come, first served basis.

February 2011
Visiting Scholar Discussion: The New Trend of Communication Studies in China
Speaker Professor Guoming Yu
Date February 7, 2011 - February 7, 2011
Time 2:00 - 3:00pm
Location ASC 300
Description

Visiting Scholar Discussion with Guoming Yu: The New Trend of Communication Studies in China

The talk will give a brief introduction of current trends in communication studies in China, including monitoring public opinions on the Internet, access and use of media, and media development indices. Professor Yu will also discuss the various methods he uses to to collect and analyse data including a system platform for monitoring public opinions, MRI experiments and other platforms.

Professor Guoming Yu is Vice Dean of the Journalism and Communication School of Renmin University of China and director of the Public Opinion Studies Center of Renmin University. The Center does opinion research and polling in academic areas, and under Professor Yu’s direction has completed hundreds of projects for main-stream media and governments.

Coffee and snacks will be provided.  Please RSVP by Friday, February 4 at 12pm.

Visiting Scholar Discussion: Between Legitimacy Management and New Governance
Speaker Manuel Puppis
Date February 14, 2011 - February 14, 2011
Time 2 - 3pm
Location ASC 300
Description

Visiting Scholar Lunchtime Discussion with Manuel Puppis:
The Political Communication of Regulatory Agencies: Between Legitimacy Management and New Governance

Following liberalization, regulatory agencies have become key actors of policy-making in broadcasting and telecommunications across Europe. Despite the fact that political communication is an integral part of politics, previous political communication and communication policy research largely ignored the communication of these regulators. On the one hand, communication can be conceptualized as a means to obtain organizational legitimacy. In the view of new sociological institutionalism, regulators’ communication is at the same time influenced by institutional environments (e.g. mediatization) and a strategic devise used to manipulate perceptions of a regulator’s activities and performance. On the other hand, communication can be viewed as a new form of governance. Communicating with the regulated industries is then seen as an alternative to command and control regulation.

Dr. Manuel Puppis is a senior research and teaching associate and the managing director of the division “Media & Politics” at the Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research (IPMZ), University of Zurich, Switzerland. He will be visiting CGCS as a Short Term Visiting Scholar in January and February 2011. Puppis holds a PhD in Communication Science and an M.A. in Communication Science (major subject), Political Science and Economic and Social History (minor subjects) from the University of Zurich.

Coffee and snacks will be provided.  Please RSVP by Friday, February 11 at 12pm.

New Media Series: Huma Yusuf
Speaker Huma Yusuf
Date February 17, 2011 - February 17, 2011
Time 12 - 1:30pm
Location CASI, 3600 Market Street Suite 560
Description

As Seen on TV: Depicting India in the Pakistani Media

Huma Yusuf is a Pakistani journalist and currently the Pakistan Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C.

The New Media Series is hosted by the Center for the Advanced Study of India.

Please RSVP by Tuesday, February 15.

March 2011
Visiting Scholar Discussion: Paolo Cavaliere
Date March 14, 2011 - March 14, 2011
Time 12 - 1pm
Location ASC 300
Description

"I Am the Fourth Estate". Leaderism and mediatization of politics: the case of Italy

Cavaliere will take a different look at the Italian industry of media; the story of its development can also be read as an example of what happens when market force is not constrained by any kind of regulation. The current highly concentrated market, where there is essentially one private competitor to the public broadcaster, has shaped the Italian information landscape in a unique way when compared to the American or European equivalents.   

In the endless debate on freedom of speech, political information, scarcity of frequencies and pluralism, the case of Italy can tell us something about how much ownership matters in biasing the news and driving the thoughts of a whole society. 

Paolo Cavaliere is a joint visiting scholar at Penn Law School and CGCS.  He earned a PhD in International Law and Economics at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. As a Teaching Fellow, he has taught Public Law, Italian and European Constitutional Law, Media Law, Regional Law and Constitutional Justice. He also holds a law degree from the University of Pavia and an LLM in Public Law from University College, London.
 
Please RSVP by Friday, March 11 at noon. Lunch will be provided on a first come, first served basis.

New Media Series: Lawrence Liang
Speaker Lawrence Liang
Date March 17, 2011 - March 17, 2011
Time 12 - 1:30pm
Location ASC 300
Description

Post Piracy: Creativity and Cinephilia Beyond Access in India and China

Lawrence Liang is the Co-founder of the Alternative Law Forum, Bangalore and a Fulbright Fellow at Columbia University.

The New Media Series is hosted by the Center for the Advanced Study of India.

Please RSVP by Tuesday, March 15 at noon.

2011 Milton Wolf Seminar
Date March 23, 2011 - March 25, 2011
Location Vienna, Austria
Description

Milton Wolf Seminar 2011

Picking Up the Pieces:  Fragmented Sovereignties and Emerging Information Flows

March 23-25, 2011 
Vienna, Austria

The Diplomatic Academy Vienna in partnership with the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania will host a seminar from March 23-25, 2011 in Vienna, Austria, organized by the American Austrian Foundation. The seminar will bring together a diverse group of individuals representing multiple perspectives and nationalities.  Panelists include distinguished print and television journalists, media development practitioners, diplomats, and academics.

The seminar is organized around the theme: Picking Up the Pieces:  Fragmented Sovereignties and Emerging Information Flows.  The purpose of the seminar is three-fold:

(1)   To identify how different actors attempt to influence the domestic media and communications landscapes of closed and transitional states in service of diplomatic and/or development goals

(2)   To investigate the implications of rapid changes in the available communication technologies for these efforts, and

(3)   To bring together students, scholars and practitioners from around the world to participate in seminars and break out sessions designed to identify current problems and possible solutions to the challenges raised by these activities.

For more information please visit the 2011 Milton Wolf Seminar website.

 

2011 International Media Law Moot Court Competition
Event/Type Moot Court Competition
Date March 30, 2011 - April 2, 2011
Location Oxford, U.K.
Description

Registration is now available for the 2011 competition.
Registration Deadline: November 12, 2010.

For more information and to apply, please visit the PCMLP website.

The Price International Media Law Moot Court Competition is organized and facilitated by the Programme in Comparative Media Law & Policy at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford, part of the university's Faculty of Law, in collaboration with the International Media Lawyers Association (IMLA).

The competition has been held annually since 2008.

The purpose of the Price Moot Court Competition is to expand and stimulate an interest in Media Law and Policy among students from law and other disciplines, who will develop expertise in arguing a case before an international bench of judges from different legal systems and backgrounds.

The international nature of this competition encourages students to gain knowledge from legal systems different from their own by carrying out comparative study and research of regional and international standards to cultivate their arguments in both writing and oral forms.

New Media Series: Raju Narisetti
Speaker Raju Narisetti
Date March 31, 2011 - March 31, 2011
Time 12 - 1:30pm
Location CASI, 3600 Market Street Suite 560
Description

India's Free Media: Fact and Fiction

Raju Narisetti is Managing Editor at The Washington Post, and previously established The Mint newspaper in India.

The New Media Series is hosted by the Center for the Advanced Study of India.

Please RSVP.

April 2011
Visiting Scholar Lunch: The Writing of Culture
Speaker Etienne Candel
Date April 20, 2011 - April 20, 2011
Time 12 - 1pm
Location ACS 300
Description

The writing of culture: media and mediations in the digital context

Lunch will be provided on a first come, first served basis.  Please RSVP by Monday, April 18.

Since the early works of Professors Emmanuël Souchier and Yves Jeanneret on “screen writings” and computer display taken as texts, numerous researchers in French universities have developed a critical approach to new media, including the digital ideologies they rely on, the socio-technical considerations they raise, and the cultural impacts they involve.

Following this school of thought, my research focuses on questioning the role of texts in digital media, in order to understand how these media are currently rewriting culture, and how they come to transform our relations to inherited mediations. Indeed, we have to take into account that computers are developed and coded. Any kind of software implies a writing of code and a structuring of the device, relying on a project, a conception of the world. Thus, studying digital media makes it necessary to question the transformations of social mediations and cultural traditions. Computer scientists, program developers and industry workers in the sector of online marketing tend to become the new cast of scribes, and to define the central mediations of culture today. The debates and criticisms about “social networking sites” are a good example of such a metamorphosis, because they transform the way social relations are written.

In my presentation I will focus on a few concepts in semiotics we are using to analyze the ways web pages and, more generally, electronic objects are written and interpreted. I will particularly describe the fields I’m currently working on in this context. “Tagclouds”, rankings, and top user lists, among other objects, are all familiar, “ordinary” forms that can be studied and understood as central places in meaning-making processes and in the development of digital ideologies.

Etienne Candel is in charge of the Digital Media Communication Master’s Program and research development at CELSA (the Graduate School of Journalism and Communication – Sorbonne University, France). His research focuses on the links between digital innovations and cultural transformations. 

 

June 2011
Communication Policy Advocacy, Technology, and Online Freedom of Expression: a Toolkit for Media Development
Date June 20, 2011 - July 1, 2011
Location Budapest, Hungary
Description

The Center for Media and Communication Studies (CMCS) at Central European University (CEU) is pleased to announce its 2011 course at the CEU Summer University, co-organized with Internews Network and the Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS) at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.

The course, "Communication Policy Advocacy, Technology, and Online Freedom of Expression: a Toolkit for Media Development," will take place on June 20 - July 1, 2011, in Budapest.

Applications from all over the world are encouraged. The deadline for applications is March 20, 2011.

Additional information is available at http://www.summer.ceu.hu/communication.

Workshop in Comparative Media Law, Policy and Regulation in the MENA Region
Date June 25, 2011 - June 27, 2011
Location Budapest, Hungary
Description

This workshop is an intensive 3-day working group for a select group of individuals from the MENA region who have demonstrated potential to be active participants in influencing and shaping media policies and institutions. This group will be joined by international experts, including lawyers, practitioners and political scientists, with experience in media transitions in other locales. It is intended to help participants think about the challenges and opportunities they will face in the months ahead, including what directions and strategies for change should be considered and implemented.

The workshop will be held at Central European University[...]

Update On Activism and Freedom of Expression in Thailand with Jiew Premchaiporn
Speaker Jiew Premchaiporn
Event/Type Conference
Date June 27, 2011 - June 27, 2011
Time 6:00 PM
Location Annenberg Public Policy Center, 202 South 36th St
Open to public with RSVP
Description

Please join online editor and advocate Chiranuch (Jiew) Premchaiporn for an update on activism and freedom of expression in Thailand. Premchaiporn is well known for her work in AIDS advocacy and internet journalism. 

We will gather Philadelphia AIDS activists, community journalists, academics and freedom of expression advocates to learn more from Jiew about the current situation in Thailand, and compare experiences with her about our struggles  on similar issues in Philadelphia. 

Background on Chiranuch (Jiew) Premchaiporn:

Premchaiporn was arrested and faces up to 50 years in jail  for cybercrime,"  because she operates an open publishing website named Prachatai, which translates as "Free People."  

After a story about the royal family, an anonymous comment was made  disparaging the King of Thailand, and in Thailand this is a very serious crime. Jiew did not make the remark, but is being held responsible for it because she is the operator of the website on which it appeared. Learn more about her case from the Electronic Frontier FoundationNY Times, and Free Speech Radio News.

Premchaiporn has also been a hero in the struggle to win global access to life saving AIDS medications, and has collaborated with members of Philadelphia ACT-UP on this campaign. 

We hope you can join us to meet this inspirational woman,  who has put brought world-wide focus on Thailand's movements for social change. 

For more information or to RSVP, please email (lsh@asc.upenn.edu

July 2011
2011 Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute
Date July 4, 2011 - July 15, 2011
Location University of Oxford
Description

Annenberg-Oxford Summer Institute Website

Application Deadline: April 1
Please send application by email to CGCS

The Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford (PCMLP) are pleased to announce the 13th annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute, to be held from July 4 - 15, 2011 at the University of Oxford.

The annual Summer Institute brings together young scholars and regulators to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy.  Students come from around the world; countries represented at previous Summer Institutes include Jordan, Italy, Thailand, Kenya, China, Brazil, Egypt, Nigeria and Russia, among others.

This year the Summer Institute will also focus on media governance and strategic communication in conflict and post-conflict environments including Sudan, Somalia and Bosnia.  At the same time, the successful curriculum that has been the foundation of the Summer Institute over the years will continue, with sessions covering topics such as media and economic/social development, freedom of information, internet regulation and convergence. Part of the course will be devoted to new developments in comparative approaches to regulation, looking at Ofcom in the UK and other agencies, including examples from the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

For more information please visit the Annenberg-Oxford Summer Institute Website.

Media and the Well-Being of Children and Adolescents in Changing Societies
Event/Type Seminar
Date July 6, 2011 - July 12, 2011
Location Beijing, China
Description

The Annenberg School for Communication, the Graduate School of Education at Penn and Renmin University of China are co-sponsoring a seminar on media and children in changing societies. The seminar will be held at Renmin University, Beijing, China from July 6 – 12, 2011

The seminar is designed to develop and enhance opportunities for international and interdisciplinary teaching and research, focusing on efforts to understand the role of the media— including videogames, television, and mobile telephony—in the life of the developing child.  Bringing together faculty from universities across China with international faculty, researchers, and other experts in the field of children and media, the seminar will work towards the development of longer-term collaboration and research projects between Chinese and international scholars.

The seminar will consider the topic from a variety of academic perspectives, including communication and journalism; psychology; education; sociology; social work; political science; and health/medicine.

Specifically, the seminar will: 

  • Examine theories and empirical research on the positive and negative effects of media on children, families, and school education;
  • Discuss research methods in the study of media and children;
  • Explore the ways in which new media technologies have changed how we think about the role of media in children’s lives;
  • Identify the unique challenges and opportunities of studying children and media in the context of China;
  • Consider important populations of children on which to focus (e.g., left-at-home; rural immigrants); and
  • Catalyze research on children and media between Chinese and international scholars and encourage comparative research and future collaborations.
Executive Course in Communication and Governance Reform
Date July 18, 2011 - July 27, 2011
Location Washington, DC
Description

The World Bank Institute’s Governance Practice, the World Bank’s Communication for Governance and Accountability Program (CommGAP), the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California are pleased to announce the 2011 pilot of the Executive Course in Communication and Governance Reform.  The course is designed for communication professionals in Africa and the Middle East who want to build critical competencies in providing implementation support to change agents and reform leaders throughout government and civil society. 

The ten-day program will equip participants with knowledge about the most recent advances in communication and proven techniques in reform implementation.  The program’s inter-disciplinary approach and regional focus will serve as the foundation for building expert networks of in-country communication practitioners and professionals. Participants will develop core competencies essential to bringing about real change, leading to development results in a wide range of sectors. Participants will acquire critical skills in four key areas:

  1. Interpreting governance diagnostics and political economy analyses
  2. Crafting multi-stakeholder coalition building strategies and tactics to support reform
  3. Providing implementation support to governance reform
  4. Applying monitoring and evaluation frameworks 

WHO SHOULD APPLY?

The course is intended for senior communication professionals in the public and private sectors, including communication directors and advisors in government, senior development practitioners engaged in communication work, and managers and executives of public affairs, public relations, and advertising firms.

Successful applicants will possess:

• Minimum 10 to 15 years of professional experience in communication, public affairs or relevant field 

• Masters degree or equivalent in communication, public affairs, political science or related field

• Fluency in spoken and written English

Full tuition scholarships, including travel support and accommodations, will be provided to successful applicants.*

TO APPLY: Please visit: www.worldbank.org/commgap 

Application Deadline: April 29, 2011

August 2011
Transfabric: A Parasitic Workshop on Transnational Do-It-Yourself
Event/Type workshop
Date August 29, 2011 - September 1, 2011
Location Budapest, Hungary
Description

This workshop brings together key thinkers and practitioners who work at the intersection of digital and urban design, making and remaking and are distributed across different cities in the United States, Europe and China. The main goal of the workshop is to provide a space for mutual engagement, and to build opportunities for future collaboration. The workshop will also contain a practical component where participants are engaged through a hands-on design brainstorming session.

To visit the Transfabric Website and blog, click here

September 2011
The Legal Enabling Environment for Independent Media in Egypt and Tunisia
Event/Type Roundtable discussion
Date September 1, 2011 - September 1, 2011
Time 1:00-5:00 p.m.
Location 1025 F Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington DC
Open to Public
Ticketing http://legalenablingenvironmentformediainegyptandtunisia.eventbrite.com/
Description

Join us for a roundtable discussion on media law in Egypt and Tunisia after the Arab Spring. As the two countries prepare for elections in the fall, media assistance stakeholders are analyzing how reforms will affect the legal enabling environment for independent media. A recent report by the Center for International Media Assistance, Media and the Law: An Overview of Legal Issues and Challenges, finds that the legal conditions under which news media operate are crucial factors to the sector’s success. A liberal and empowering legal regime can enable the growth of media and allow them to fulfill their function as watchdog of democratic society without fear of legal sanction, thus helping to make governments more accountable. What current laws, regulations, and practices affect journalists in Egypt and Tunisia? What legislation is being drafted to replace or supplement them, and how will it have an impact on independent media? How can local civil society organizations, donors, implementers, and policymakers use this transition to negotiate meaningful change in the legal enabling environment?

For more information about the event and to RSVP please click here

The New Advertising System: Innovations and Risks
Speaker Joseph Turow
Event/Type Seminar
Date September 8, 2011 - September 8, 2011
Location RIA Novosti Press Center, Moscow
Description
To commemorate its 70th anniversary, the Russian Information Agency RIA Novosti has organized a series of seminars with the world’s leading experts in the field of media technology. On September 8, 2011, Joseph Turow, Ph.D., the Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, will deliver a talk entitled “The New Advertising System: Innovations and Risks” at RIA Novosti’s new multimedia press center in Moscow.

RIA Novosti describes Prof. Turow as “a world renowned expert in new media convergence, marketing and society.” Prof. Turow’s talk will focus on the changes that the U.S., Russian and European advertisement markets have undergone in the digital age. 

“I was very pleased to be invited to speak at RIA Novosti about my research on the transformation of advertising in the digital era.  In the course of my research and my lectures around the world, I've observed how different countries adapt to new media technologies, especially when it comes to issues surrounding digital marketing. I therefore welcomed the opportunity to speak with practitioners and academics in Russia about new media developments there and its relation to new-media developments in the U.S. and elsewhere,” said Prof. Turow.

According to the press release from RIA Novosti, “Dr. Turow has given numerous lectures around the world. He has seen first-hand ‘how different nations have adapted to new technologies and especially to digital marketing’.”

This seminar will also be a platform for discussing recent changes in the global and Russian advertising system, the transformation of the information space in general, as well as the reasons for advertisers’ changing attitude toward their target audience. In addition, Dr. Turow will talk about the emergence of the new types of mass media and the methodological restructuring of existing media organizations.   

Seminar participants will have the opportunity to discuss the changes occurring in the advertisement market, voice their concerns, share their opinions and experience, and discover which business models are the most effective for the media industry.
 
More than 100 media representatives, bloggers and media experts are expected to attend the seminar. Nokia is the official partner for this series of seminars. 
Media in Conflict: The Evaluation Imperative
Date September 9, 2011 - September 9, 2011
Time 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Location U.S. Institute of Peace, 2301 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington DC
Open to Public with RSVP
Ticketing RSVP
Description

Never before have the media played a more integral role in conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction. At the same time, funding agencies and policymaking bodies have greater expectations for demonstrating impact and efficacy in conflict management.

To meet these growing needs, media development practitioners, donors, international broadcasters and methodologists have collectively authored the “Caux Guiding Principles,” a USIP PeaceWorks forthcoming in December 2011.  The “Principles” aim to improve monitoring and evaluation of media interventions in conflict zones.  Such media interventions can consist of promoting a particular message through the media or projects geared towards building the capacity of media organizations themselves.

On September 9, 2011 the authors of the “Caux Guiding Principles" will present their findings.Media in Conflict: The Evaluation Imperative will feature speakers and panel presentations recommending ways to harness the power of the media for conflict prevention and peacebuilding, and a keynote address by David Ensor, director of Voice of America and former director of Communications and Public Diplomacy at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan.This event is jointly organized by the United States Broadcasting Board of Governors; the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania; Fondation Hirondelle; Internews Network; and the United States Institute of Peace.  

To RSVP please click here!

To watch the live webcast beginning at 9:00 am EST on September 9th, please click here

Moscow Prime Time: How the Soviet Union Built the Media Empire that Lost the Cold War
Speaker Professor Kristin Roth-Ey, Lecturer in Modern Russian History at the University College London
Event/Type Noon-time colloquium
Date September 15, 2011 - September 16, 2011
Location College Hall 219 and Annenberg School Room 500
Open to Public with RSVP
Description

When Nikita Khrushchev visited Hollywood in 1959 only to be scandalized by a group of scantily clad actresses, his message was blunt: Soviet culture would soon consign capitalist mass culture, epitomized by Hollywood, to the dustbin of history. The USSR had surged full force into the modern media age after World War II, building cultural infrastructures--and audiences--that were among the world's largest. Yet success brought complex and unintended consequences.  The postwar era saw the Soviets’ new media empire transformed from within to produce something dynamic and volatile: a new Soviet culture increasingly similar to that of its self-defined capitalist enemy. By the 1970s, the Soviet media empire, stretching far beyond its founders' wildest dreams, was busily undermining the very promise of a unique Soviet culture—and visibly losing the cultural cold war. Moscow Prime Time is the first book to untangle the paradoxes of Soviet success and failure in the postwar media age.

Kristin Roth-Ey is Lecturer in Modern Russian History at University College London. Her research interests focus on the intersection of cultural, social, and political dynamics in the post-WWII era. She received her Ph.D. in History from Princeton University.

Thursday, September 15: Discussion with the author
6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
Location: College Hall 219, University of Pennsylvania

Participants should have read two chapters from the book in advance of the workshop. If you are interested in attending, please contact Laura Schwartz-Henderson for the readings.

Friday, September 16: Annenberg Lunchtime Colloquium
12:00-1:30 p.m.
Location: Annenberg  Room 500
Lunch will be provided beginning at 11:45am.

To RSVP and for more information on these events, please contact Laura Schwartz-Henderson.

Afghanistan Moot Court Competition
Date September 19, 2011 - September 21, 2011
Location Kabul, Afghanistan
Description

CGCS’s Afghanistan program (AMDEP) will close its first year of activities with a media law moot court competition in Kabul, Afghanistan. Teams from five universities across Afghanistan (Alberony University, Balkh University, Herat University, Kabul University and Nangarhar University) will participate. A moot court competition provides students the opportunity to gain and develop practical legal skill sets, increase their analytic aptitude, build their confidence in public speaking, and interact with academic staff, practitioners and judges. For more information about the other moot court competitions that CGCS and its partners organize, please visit the PCMLP website.

October 2011
ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series: ICTs and Literacy for the Very Poor: A decade of work
Speaker Dan Wagner, UNESCO Chair in Learning and Literacy, Professor and Director, International Education and Development Program, and Director, International Literacy Institute, GSE
Event/Type Seminar
Date October 6, 2011 - October 6, 2011
Time 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Location Rm 500, Annenberg School For Communication, 3620 Walnut St
Description

We are delighted to announce the launch of Penn’s first Seminar Series on Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D)*

Presenter: Dan Wagner, UNESCO Chair in Learning and Literacy, Professor and Director, International Education and Development Program, and Director, International Literacy Institute, GSE

Title of talk: “ICT and Literacy for the Very Poor: A decade of work”

Abstract:

In many developing countries, over the past decade, the atmospherics concerning information and communications technologies (ICTs) has undergone a dramatic change: from (1) “are you crazy?” to (2) “well, let's see what pieces might work for us,” to (3) “ICTs are the answer.” Even for the poorest countries, the benefits of ICT are now (in 2011) seen as relatively well-suited for coping with the problems of literacy and basic education (and other sectors), and for enhancing the socio-economic consequences for the lives of the users. The reasons for this are varied, and still debated, along with the types of solutions proposed to date. Various examples will be discussed, including the author’s work over the past decade in India and South Africa.

 Introduction of the Seminar Series by Joseph Sun, Vice Dean, SEAS

 ABOUT THE SERIES

The Information Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) Seminar Series is a new interdisciplinary venture at Penn to bring together researchers, students, and leaders from all sectors who are interested in better understanding the role that ICTs play in international development, and the impact that they have on impoverished and under-resourced communities. The Series will bring together noted researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in the ICT4D field, and will provide a venue for the Penn community to explore this important area of work.

 Please RSVP to Laura Schwartz-Henderson (lsh@asc.upenn.edu) by Wednesday, September 27.

 For more information about the series, please visit the ICT4D website

ICT4D Seminar Series Faculty Core Group: Emily Hannum (Assoc Professor Sociology & Education, GR Chair Sociology),  John Jemmott (Kenneth B. Clark Professor, ASC), Monroe E. Price (Director, Center for Global Communication Studies, ASC), Carrie Kovarik (Asst Professor Dermatology, Dermatopathology, and Infectious Diseases, SOM), Joseph Sun (Vice Dean, SEAS), Dan Wagner (UNESCO Chair & Professor GSE)

 PhD Student Coordinators: Deepti Chittamuru (ASC, lead contact), Katie Murphy (GSE), David Conrad (ASC)

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* The ICT4D Seminar is supported by the Provost’s Interdisciplinary Initiatives Fund, the Annenberg School for Communication, the Graduate School of Education/International Educational Development Program, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Programmatic support is provided by Annenberg's Center for Global Communication Studies.


Former Visiting Scholar Guobin Yang to deliver noon-time lecture at Annenberg
Speaker Guobin Yang
Date October 7, 2011 - October 7, 2011
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication, Room 111
Description
Guobin Yang, Ph.D., Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures at Barnard College, Columbia University, will deliver a noon-time colloquium talk at Annenberg on Friday, October 7 in Room 111. This event is being sponsored in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Sociology. A title and abstract will be forthcoming.
 
Dr. Yang is familiar to many here at Annenberg. In the Fall term of 2010 he was a Visiting Scholar in the Annenberg Scholars Program in Culture and Communication. While here that term he taught the course, and delivered the lecture titled Forbidden Books and Filtered Words: Transgressive Communication in China from the Cultural Revolution to the Internet
 
About Prof. Yang:
 
Guobin Yang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures at Barnard College, Columbia University. He is also on the faculty in the Weatherhead East Asian Institute and affiliated faculty in the Department of Sociology of Columbia University. He has published on a wide range of social issues in China, including the internet and civil society, environmental NGOs, the 1989 student movement, the Red Guard Movement, and collective memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. His books include The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online (Columbia University Press, June 2009), Re-Envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (edited with Ching-Kwan Lee, 2007), China's Red Guard Generation: Loyalty, Dissent, and Nostalgia, 1966-1999 (under contract, Columbia University Press), and Dragon-Carving and the Literary Mind (2 volumes. Library of Chinese Classics in English Translation, Beijing, 2003). Yang received a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation “Writing and Research Grant” (2003), was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington , D.C. (2003-2004), and taught as an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (2000-2005). He has a Ph. D. in English Literature with a specialty in Literary Translation from Beijing Foreign Studies University (1993) and a second Ph.D. in Sociology from New York University (2000).
ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series: Myths of Information Technology for International Development
Speaker Kentaro Toyama, Visiting Researcher, School of Information, University of California, Berkeley
Date October 13, 2011 - October 13, 2011
Time 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP
Description

Title: Myths of Information Technology for International Development

By: Kentaro Toyama, Visiting Researcher, School of Information, University of California, Berkeley

 Abstract: The past decade has seen incredible interest in applying information and communication technologies for international development, an endeavor often abbreviated "ICT4D." Can mobile phones be used to improve rural healthcare? How do you design user interfaces for an illiterate migrant worker? What value is technology to a farmer earning $1 a day? Interventionist ICT4D projects seek to answer these kinds of questions, but the excitement has also generated a lot of hype about the power of technology to solve the deep problems of poverty. In this talk, I will (1) present several myths of ICT4D that persist despite evidence to the contrary, (2) offer a theory of "technology as amplifier" which explains the gap between rhetoric and reality, and (3) provide recommendations for successful ICT4D interventions. My hope is to temper the brash claims of technology with realism about its true potential.


About the Speaker: Dr. Kentaro Toyama (hyperlink to: www.kentarotoyama.org) is a visiting researcher in the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley. He is working on a book that argues that increasing wisdom should be the primary focus of global development. Toyama co-founded Microsoft Research India, where he started an interdisciplinary research group to understand how electronic technology could support the socio-economic development of the world’s impoverished communities.  The group's projects - including Digital Green, MultiPoint, and Text-Free UI - have been seminal in ICT4D research. Prior to his time in India, he did computer vision and multimedia research at Microsoft Research in Redmond, WA, USA and Cambridge, UK, and taught mathematics at Ashesi University in Accra, Ghana. Toyama graduated from Yale with a PhD in Computer Science and from Harvard with a bachelor’s degree in Physics.

 ABOUT THE SERIES: The Information Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) Seminar Series is a new interdisciplinary venture at Penn to bring together researchers, students, and leaders from all sectors who are interested in better understanding the role that ICTs play in international development, and the impact that they have on impoverished and under-resourced communities. The Series will bring together noted researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in the ICT4D field, and will provide a venue for the Penn community to explore this important area of work.

To RSVP, please email Laura Schwartz-Henderson (hyperlink to lsh@asc.upenn.edu)

For more information about the series, please visit the ICT4D website

 ICT4D Seminar Series Faculty Core Group: Emily Hannum (Assoc Professor Sociology & Education, GR Chair Sociology),  John Jemmott (Kenneth B. Clark Professor, ASC), Monroe E. Price (Director, Center for Global Communication Studies, ASC), Carrie Kovarik (Asst Professor Dermatology, Dermatopathology, and Infectious Diseases, SOM), Joseph Sun (Vice Dean, SEAS), Dan Wagner (UNESCO Chair & Professor GSE)

 PhD Student Coordinators: Deepti Chittamuru (ASC, lead contact), Katie Murphy (GSE), David Conrad (ASC)

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* The ICT4D Seminar is supported by the Provost’s Interdisciplinary Initiatives Fund, the Annenberg School for Communication, the Graduate School of Education/International Educational Development Program, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Programmatic support is provided by Annenberg's Center for Global Communication Studies.

Lunchtime Research Panel: Coordinating Media Response Efforts in Haiti with Internews network
Event/Type panel discussion
Date October 17, 2011 - October 17, 2011
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 300
Ticketing RSVP
Description

Since the devastating 7.0 earthquake in Haiti on January 12, 2011, Internews Network has been working with local Haitian media and humanitarian aid agencies to get critical information directly to the people who need it most. Internew's initiative in Haiti is a cross-cluster service that brings together experts in outreach and communications and humanitarians in a collective effort to improve a two-way communication flow between the humanitarian community and affected populations.  The program provides a coordinated service to maximize aid effectiveness and disseminate information, using radio and local media to explain food distribution systems, publicize vaccination campaigns, and provide information for displaced people with HIV/AIDS. 

Core to the project is a major research component that seeks public opinion about information needs that would help Haitians rebuild their lives, avoid getting sick from infectious diseases, and understand and be informed about the various reconstruction efforts underway. 

On October 17, we will host the project’s director of research and a group of Haitian researchers, trained in social science research methods, who have been conducting surveys, focus groups and other research throughout Haiti as part of an effort to assist with humanitarian media efforts.

Please join us for a lunchtime presentation and discussion with the Internews-Haiti representatives and the Penn community.

 To RSVP please contact lsh@asc.upenn.edu

Media Spectacle, the Arab Uprisings, and Constructions of a Democratic Future: Some Critical Reflections
Speaker Douglas Kellner
Event/Type Presentation
Date October 25, 2011 - October 25, 2011
Time 4:30 PM-6:00 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication, Room 500
Description
The Annenberg School for Communication presents a colloquium by guest speaker Douglas Kellner, Ph.D., the George Kellner Chair in the Philosophy of Education at UCLA. This event is co-sponsored by Penn’s Department of Urban Studies. Prof. Kellner will present his talk, “Media Spectacle, the Arab Uprisings, and Constructions of a Democratic Future: Some Critical Reflections.”
 
Abstract:
 
In a series of books and articles, I have been arguing that the concept of media spectacle provides a key to interpreting contemporary culture and politics, arguing that media spectacle has become a global phenomenon organizing news, journalism, politics, and entertainment. I will discuss a range of political spectacles, from megaspectacles such as:  (a) the 9/11 attacks in 2001 that helped constitute a historical era, (b) the Terror War that characterized the Bush-Cheney, and (c) the 2008 election spectacle that inaugurated the Obama era. I will argue that in addition to politics, war, terrorism and media events constructed and presented as media spectacle, in 2011 revolution and democratic uprisings have also emerged as a powerful form of media spectacle. Engaging the North African Uprisings and what Al-Jazeera calls the "Arab Awakening," I will discuss how the democratic uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya produce new models of political transformation that have been transmitted throughout the region as media spectacle and have generated intense conflict. I argue that these events provide grounding to use once again the concept of revolution developed by Herbert Marcuse, and I will discuss the sense in which the Arab Uprisings are or are not revolution. I will also discuss the key role of Al-Jazeera as a voice of democratic revolution in the Arab Uprisings.
Please contact Debra Williams for additional information.
November 2011
ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series: Phone-based Tools for Community Health Workers
Speaker Neal Lesh, Chief Strategy Officer of Dimagi, Inc
Event/Type Seminar
Date November 3, 2011 - November 3, 2011
Time 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Location Room 500, Annenberg School for Communication, 3620 Walnut St.
Description

The Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) Seminar Series presents:

Phone-based Tools for Community Health Workers

It is increasingly possible to apply computer innovation to improve aspects of health care delivery in low-income countries. In this talk, Neal Lesh will provide an overview of some recent efforts in ‘eHealth’ and ‘mHealth’ and discuss his experiences with implementing CommCare, a phone based tool for Community Health Workers that has been used over the last four years in sub-Saharan Africa and India.   Dr. Lesh will provide an overview of the tool, discuss challenges, lessons learned, and some recent successes.     

About the Speaker: Neal Lesh is the Chief Strategy Officer of Dimagi, Inc, an award-winning, socially-conscious technology company that helps organizations deliver quality health care to urban and rural communities across the world. He received a PhD in computer science from the University of Washington in 1998 and a Master in Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health.  From 2005-2009, he lived in East and Southern Africa, working on information systems for projects including large-scale AIDS treatment programs, rural hospitals, and research projects.  His primary focus now is on the CommCare project, a phone-based tool for use by community health works in low-income countries.

About the Series: The Information Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) Seminar Series is a new interdisciplinary venture at Penn to bring together researchers, students, and leaders from all sectors who are interested in better understanding the role that ICTs play in international development, and the impact that they have on impoverished and under-resourced communities. The Series will bring together noted researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in the ICT4D field, and will provide a venue for the Penn community to explore this important area of work. The ICT4D Seminar is supported by the Provost’s Interdisciplinary Initiatives Fund, the Annenberg School for Communication, the Graduate School of Education/International Educational Development Program, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Programmatic support is provided by the Annenberg Center for Global Communication Studies.

 Please RSVP to Laura Schwartz-Henderson at lsh@asc.upenn.edu

 For more info, contact: Deepti Chittamuru at dchittamuru@asc.upenn.edu or visit http://www.asc.upenn.edu/ict4datpenn/  

Global Experiences of Media Reform: Activists and Academics Speak on Localism and Consolidation
Event/Type Panel
Date November 8, 2011 - November 8, 2011
Time 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Location Temple University
Open to Public
Description

This event brings together activists, scholars, and students to appraise global experiences of media reform. Over the last two decades we have witnessed intense deregulation of media policy around the world. Recognizing the importance of plural and diverse media to a well functioning and accountable democracy, communities across the Americas have been fighting for local media representation and access to media production, challenging the consolidation of media in the United States and Latin America.  

In the United States, the work of media activists over the past ten years has finally started to bear fruit. On January 4th, President Obama signed the bipartisan Local Community Radio Act, making possible thousands of new community radio stations. On July 7th, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit rejected the FCC’s attempt to further deregulate media ownership. Meanwhile, in Argentina, after decades of struggle, the government has passed new legislation to challenge the corporate consolidation of media; and in Venezuela, grassroots media activists have aligned with the controversial government of Hugo Chávez to expand legislation and funding structures to sustain community media projects.

Bringing together academics and activists whose work focuses on changing media policy and practices in these contexts, this event will highlight the efforts to gain access to communications systems in times of information deprivation and crisis. Panelists will address media policy, justice, activism, state involvement in media systems, and the meaning of a free press in the Americas.

Panelists:
       
Eric Klinenberg is Professor of Sociology, Public Policy, and Media, Culture, and Communications at New York University, and editor of the journal Public Culture.   Klinenberg's first book, Heat Wave: A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago, won six scholarly and literary prizes.  Professor Klinenberg's second book, Fighting for Air: The Battle to Control America’s Media, offers insight into the increasingly consolidated media landscape and the political and grassroots fight to regain control of America’s media. 

April Glaser is an undergraduate student at Temple University majoring in Philosophy. Glaser was instrumental in the creation of Radio Free Nashville, a low power community radio station in the backyard of her home in Tennessee (documented in Professor Klinenberg’s book Fighting for Air). Glaser moved to Philadelphia in 2006 to work with the Prometheus Radio Project where she organized public testimony for the FCC Public Hearings about Media Consolidation in 2006-2007 nationwide.  Her organizing efforts with Prometheus’ national campaign helped propel the passage of the 2011 Local Community Radio Act, which expands the low power FM radio service for noncommercial community groups.

Damián Loreti is Vice Dean of the School of Social Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires and holds the UNESCO-AUGM Chair in Freedom of Expression, Faculty of Journalism and Mass Communications, University of La Plata, Argentina. Loreti is a prominent lawyer and intellectual who has served as legal counselor to the Argentine Federation of Press Workers. He also serves as the legal counselor at PERIODISTAS (Association for the Defense of the Independent Journalism). He was instrumental in the decades-long struggle to pass media reform legislation in 2009 to deconsolidate ownership of Argentina’s media.

Jesús Suárez is Director of Catia TVe, Venezuela's oldest and most prominent community television station. For the past decade Suárez has been organizing in the low-income barrios of Caracas to teach television production skills and advocate for the importance of local control over media outlets. 

Pete Tridish was a member of the founding collective of Radio Mutiny, 91.3 FM in Philadelphia, and a founder of the Prometheus Radio Project. He participated in the rulemaking that led up to the adoption of LPFM, and 10 years of further rulemaking that followed. Tridish fought against consolidation of media ownership, and was involved in the lawsuit Prometheus vs. the FCC, which stopped the FCC from weakening media ownership rules. He also worked to pass the Local Community Radio Act, which will allow for thousands of new community radio stations across the country. 

Co-Moderator: Dan Denvir is a staff writer for the Philadelphia CityPaper. 

Co-Moderator: Naomi Schiller is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Temple University. Over the past decade, she has done research on media and politics in Venezuela. She is currently completing her book manuscript, Televising the Revolution: Community Media, the State, and Popular Politics in Venezuela based on ethnographic research with community television producers in Caracas. 

Maker Culture: China’s Emerging Economy of D.I.Y. and Open Technology Production
Speaker Silvia Lindtner
Event/Type Lunchtime Seminar
Date November 16, 2011 - November 16, 2011
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 300
Description

Abstract: “Maker culture” has become a dominant label for creative communities that embrace a Do-It-Yourself (D.I.Y.) approach to independent technological development. The movement leverages traditions of craftsmanship with open source culture to promote experimentation through tinkering, the bricolage of old and new and a questioning of the current status quo in global technology production. 

In this talk, Lindtner traces through ethnographic detail how these values of tinkering, open source and hands-on technology production are taken up and mobilized in a hacker and co-working space in Shanghai, China.  She explores how the theme of maker and D.I.Y. technology production is often seen as a translocal phenomenon and rendered as a progressive and “cool” force in Chinese modernization. Lindtner’s research focuses on the complex and entangled paths of material and semiotic production around maker culture that emerge at the frictions of modernization discourse, foreign investments and transnational migration. She illustrates how the hacker and co-working space in Shanghai employs the framework of D.I.Y. making and sharing of technology to position itself as a participant in Chinese Internet counterculture and as strategically aligned with free culture and open innovation projects in the U.S. She interrogates what models of global citizenship are embedded in the discourses and practices of maker culture and the forms of governmentality that are inscribed in constructions of a technologically savvy, self-creating and transnational citizen.

About the Speaker: Silvia Lindtner is a PhD Candidate in the department of Informatics at the University of California, Irvine. Her dissertation research focuses on cultural processes of technology production within the context of urban China. Over the last five years, Lindtner has conducted ethnographic research with Chinese youth, IT professionals and a collective of electronic hackers, freelance designers, new media artists and bloggers, exploring how these various social groups design and use digital technologies to position themselves in the changing urban, social and political environment of China's cities today. Her work investigates the role digital media play for imaginations of Chinese modernity and translocal ideas of open innovation, free culture, creativity and D.I.Y. technology production. Currently, in part supported by a Chinese government scholarship, Lindtner is completing her thesis on “Multi-Sited Design: Translocal D.I.Y., Hacker and Internet Counter Culture in Urban China.”

Please RSVP to Laura Schwartz-Henderson

 

Sixty Years of Army Broadcasting in Israel: The Anomaly of Galei Tzahal
Speaker Oren Soffer
Event/Type Lunchtime Seminar
Date November 22, 2011 - November 22, 2011
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 300
Description

Israel’s Army Radio (Galei Tzahal) has been broadcasting for sixty years with programming aimed at the civilian population. From a marginal station playing just a few hours a day, it has become a major broadcasting organization that operates two full radio channels and provides news and political coverage. It is also considered one of the most influential training grounds for journalists and media figures in Israel. Using extensive archive materials and in-depth interviews with the station's commanders, Soffer examinse how military broadcasts—ostensibly foreign to the democratic experience—have become a symbol of pluralism, journalistic freedom, and (in some historical periods) the cultural avant-garde in Israel. He also analyzes how the station has adapted to changes in the developing Israeli media.

Oren Soffer is a senior lecturer at the Open University of Israel, and is currently a visiting scholar at MIT's Comparative Media Studies program. Oren earned his PhD from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2002. In the same year, he was accepted as a member of the Israeli Bar Association after completing his legal studies at Tel Aviv University. Oren has served as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto, taught as a visiting scholar at Rutgers University and held a lecturer position at Manchester University (U.K).

His research interests include the socio-political and technological history of Hebrew mass communication. In recent years, Oren has also been engaged in the study of new media, using historical analysis to better understand and theorize new textual and social phenomena. His current study in this area deals with comparative and theoretical conceptualization of language in the digital era (SMS/CMC languages).

December 2011
CGCS Visiting Scholar Seminar: Transcultural Television Formats and their Audiences: A Comparative Study on the Appropriation of the Top Model-Format in Different Cultural Contexts
Speaker Miriam Stehling
Event/Type Lunchtime Seminar
Date December 1, 2011 - December 1, 2011
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 300
Description

“Transcultural Television Formats and their Audiences:  A Comparative Study on the Appropriation of the Top Model-Format in Different Cultural Contexts”

By Miriam Stehling (Leuphana University Lueneburg)

Abstract:  In this talk, Miriam will present first findings from her Ph.D. research project on global reality television formats and their audiences in different cultural contexts. In particular, the project is concerned with the question of how the narrative of the "gendered enterprising self” is reproduced in the Top Model-format, and how it is appropriated and negotiated by young female viewers in Germany and the USA. Drawing on the theoretical framework of governmentality by Michel Foucault and the theoretical concept of transculturality, empirical audience research is used to understand the worldwide success of the Top Model-format and its negotiation in the everyday life of viewers. Through the method of focus groups, the study shows that viewers appropriate and negotiate the television text in their specific cultural and social contexts, while at the same time transcultural patterns of appropriation and negotiation strategies and processes which are shared across different cultural contexts become evident.

About the Speaker: Miriam Stehling is research fellow and PhD student at the Institute of Communications and Media Culture at the Leuphana University of Lueneburg, Germany. Miriam holds an M.A. in Cultural Studies with specializations in Business Administration, Language & Communications as well as Media & Public Relations from the Leuphana University of Lueneburg. She was Erasmus exchange student at the Universidad Autònoma de Barcelona in 2006/07 and completed an internship at the German Embassy in Washington D.C. in 2008. She teaches classes at the Leuphana University of Lueneburg in the field of media commmunications and media culture and has published articles and presented papers on the topics of global reality television formats, transcultural research and the female enterprising self in reality tv (in German: "Die ‚Unternehmerin ihrer selbst‘ im Reality TV: Geschlechtsspezifische Anrufungen und Aushandlungen in Germany’s next Topmodel“).

ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series: Designing a More Equitable Internet
Speaker Tapan Parikh, Assistant Professor, School of Information, University of California, Berkeley
Event/Type Seminar
Date December 5, 2011 - December 5, 2011
Time 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP
Description

Abstract: How do we design appropriate and accessible information systems to serve the needs of poor, indigenous, remote and otherwise marginalized communities in the developing and developed world? What is the impact that new kinds of data and communications tools can have for improving transparency and trust in governance, aid and philanthropy? Dr. Parikh and his research group have recently developed Awaaz.De, a phone-based voice message board allowing small farmers in India to ask and answer agricultural questions. Using any phone, farmers navigate a voice interface to record questions, obtain answers from experts, and to listen to and answer the questions of others. This system has been deployed in Gujarat, India for over two years, consistently receiving hundreds of calls a week. Another project, LocalGround, is investigating the use of paper maps for collecting local geo-spatial knowledge. Users annotate paper maps using colored markers and stamps. These annotations are automatically extracted using a combination of simple computer vision and crowd-sourcing techniques.Local Ground was recently used by teenagers from Richmond, California for planning of a public park in their community, presenting their ideas to the mayor's office.

In this talk, Dr. Parikh will explore several themes, including a) the design of cheap, "low-fidelity" interaction techniques allowing new populations to interact with and author content; b) the importance of "bottom-up" data for planning and evaluating development projects; and c) how "crowd data processing", interleaving automated and human-driven steps, can bridge the gap between (a) and (b).

About the Speaker: Dr. Tapan Parikh is an Assistant Professor at the School of Information at the University of California, Berkeley. Tapan's research interests include human-computer interaction (HCI), mobile computing, speech UIs and information systems for microfinance, smallholder agriculture and global health. For the past 10+ years, Tapan has been designing, developing and deploying information systems in the rural developing world - initially in India, and now also in Latin America and Africa. Tapan and his students have started several technology companies serving rural communities and the development sector. He holds a Sc.B. degree in Molecular Modeling with Honors from Brown University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from the University of Washington, where he won the William Chan award for his Ph.D. dissertation. Tapan was named Technology Review magazine's Humanitarian of the Year in 2007, and Esquire magazine called him one of the "Best and Brightest" in 2008.

ABOUT THE SERIES: The Information Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) Seminar Series is a new interdisciplinary venture at Penn to bring together researchers, students, and leaders from all sectors who are interested in better understanding the role that ICTs play in international development, and the impact that they have on impoverished and under-resourced communities. The Series will bring together noted researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in the ICT4D field, and will provide a venue for the Penn community to explore this important area of work.

To RSVP, please email Laura Schwartz-Henderson (hyperlink to lsh@asc.upenn.edu)

For more information about the series, please visit the ICT4D website

 ICT4D Seminar Series Faculty Core Group: Emily Hannum (Assoc Professor Sociology & Education, GR Chair Sociology),  John Jemmott (Kenneth B. Clark Professor, ASC), Monroe E. Price (Director, Center for Global Communication Studies, ASC), Carrie Kovarik (Asst Professor Dermatology, Dermatopathology, and Infectious Diseases, SOM), Joseph Sun (Vice Dean, SEAS), Dan Wagner (UNESCO Chair & Professor GSE)

 PhD Student Coordinators: Deepti Chittamuru (ASC), Katie Murphy (GSE), David Conrad (ASC)

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* The ICT4D Seminar is supported by the Provost’s Interdisciplinary Initiatives Fund, the Annenberg School for Communication, the Graduate School of Education/International Educational Development Program, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Programmatic support is provided by Annenberg's Center for Global Communication Studies.

Cinema in Iran: Circulation, Censorship and Cultural Production
Event/Type Conference
Date December 16, 2011 - December 17, 2011
Location ICI Berlin
Description
Iran is undergoing a period of socio-political transformation joined to a cultural space that despite binding censorship regulations, circumnavigates restrictive bans and, in the world of film, generates award winning, critically acclaimed masterpieces. 
In the course of this two-day conference, participants will investigate cinema in Iran as part of Iran’s rich media and cultural ecology. The conference brings together international scholars on topics, which explore:
  • The contemporary political and industrial context in which films are produced, distributed, and consumed in Iran and the ways in which formal and informal censorship structures and practices impact the industry;Film as both a formal and informal information conduit in closed or censored societies;
  • Cinematic circulation and flows among and between the Iranian Diaspora and Iranians in Iran;
  • The role of Iranian cinema as public diplomacy and public debate surrounding film in Iran;
  • The political economy of film in Iran, including piracy and do-it-yourself (DIY) cinematic production such as YouTube;
  • The role of cinema vis à vis television: subject migration, professional migration, content regulation

 
To register for this conference, please send an email to irancinema(at)asc.upenn.edu

About the conference:

This event is sponsored by the Iran Media Program at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania with support from the Free University of Berlin and George Washington University. 


For more information, please visit http://www.ici-berlin.org/event/414/ 

Media and New Technology in India
Date December 19, 2011 - December 20, 2011
Location India International Centre, Delhi
Description

December 19-20, 2011
India International Centre, Delhi
Organized by the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy (PCMLP) at the University of Oxford; the National Law University, Delhi; the National University of Juridical Sciences, Kolkata; and the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania

The two-day symposium will explore international and comparative perspectives on current issues of topical significance to media policy makers in India and abroad. This event will combine both theory and practice, while bringing together a group of top scholars, lawyers and regulators from the international community with a similarly excellent set of speakers from India. Continuing last year’s tradition of focusing on media and new technologies, the symposium will address and discuss regulation of the Internet, media and public order, law, and self-regulation and responsibilities of media entities.

Registration is free but spaces are limited.  For more information and to register, please visit the symposium's website

We are delighted to once again hold the symposium in conjunction with the Oxford-India Media Law Moot Court Competition, which serves as regional rounds for the Price Moot Court Programme.  

January 2012
A New Social Contract: the Role of Transparency in an Information Society
Speaker Dorothy Chou, Senior Policy Analyst at Google
Event/Type CGCS Seminar Series Event
Date January 24, 2012 - January 24, 2012
Time 1:00- 2:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Open to Public with RSVP
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

Our society was founded on the principle that individuals grant governments the authority to create and enforce laws that protect and uphold their fundamental rights. But while this authority over policy creation used to rest with the rich and powerful by default, today the Internet has tipped the scales in favor of empowering individuals to make informed decisions for themselves and hold governments accountable.  

In many cases, the power of this medium makes governments uncomfortable -- and it's not always the ones one might think. Moreover, with intermediaries playing a curatorial role in providing access to information, citizens now have two different sets of policies to consider. What should governments and companies do to ensure they reflect the best interests of their users and constituents? Do they have a responsibility to do so, and are responsibilities for public and private entities different? During this seminar, Dorothy Chou will discuss how transparency reporting can provide modern checks and balances in the information age, and what that actually means in practice.

Dorothy Chou is a Senior Policy Analyst and leads Google's policy efforts to increase transparency, and serves as the policy lead for the Google Transparency Report. She manages the day-to-day operations of the Central Public Policy team at Google's headquarters, and handles government relations for Google's Crisis Response/Disaster Relief projects as well as the Data Liberation Front

This is the first event in the Center for Global Communication Studies Spring 2012 Seminar Series

New Media and Political Movements: How the Internet has Shaped the Iranian Green Movement
Speaker Babak Rahimi
Event/Type Seminar
Date January 31, 2012 - January 31, 2012
Time 1:00 PM- 2:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 300
Open to Public with RSVP
Description

In this talk, Babak Rahimi will discuss the role of new media, in particular the Internet, in the Iranian Green Movement, a political protest movement that emerged after the contested 2009 presidential elections in Iran. 

During the Seminar, Dr. Rahimi will show the intricate relationship between political activism and cyberspace, and how political movements sustain or (re)invent themselves online in close connection with offline activism. Dr. Rahimi argues that cyberprotests, particularly in the case of the Iranian Green Movement, involve the creative configuration of complex “performative networks” that essentially interact through meaning-laden performances that carve out shifting spaces of dissent. For political movements, especially under authoritarian rule, new media presents an alternative social space wherein conceptions of self and other, resistance and power shape distinct bonds of interactivity, social bonds that open up new ways of doing politics, new ways of imagining the political. From Neda Agha-Sultan’s video clip to February 14th (2011) demonstrations, mostly organized on Facebook and other social networking sites, Dr. Rahimi will explore various online political activities and ultimately identify new media as a distinct public site that entails transgressive modes of communication. 

Babak Rahimi is the 2012-2013 Post Doctoral Research Fellow for CGCS’ Iran Media Program. Dr. Rahimi is an Assistant Professor in the Program for the Study of Religion at UC San Diego’s Department of Literature. He received a Ph.D from the European University Institute, Florence, Italy, in October 2004. Rahimi has also studied at the University of Nottingham, where he obtained a M.A. in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, and London School of Economics and Political Science, where he was a Visiting Fellow at the Department of Anthropology, 2000-2001. Rahimi has written numerous articles on culture, religion and politics and regularly writes on contemporary Iraqi and Iranian politics. He has been the recipient of fellowships from the national endowment for the Humanities and Jean Monnet Fellowship at the European University Institute, and was a Senior Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace, Washington DC and a visiting scholar at the Internet Institute, University of Oxford. Rahimi’s current research project is on the relationship between digital culture, politics and religion in post-revolutionary Iran.

This event is part of the Spring 2012 CGCS Seminar Series, “Internet Policy Formation: Global Actors, Global Outcomes”. It is co-sponsored by the Middle East Center at Penn

February 2012
Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom
Speaker Rebecca MacKinnon
Event/Type CGCS Seminar Series Event
Date February 21, 2012 - February 21, 2012
Time 2:00-3:00 PM
Location University of Pennsylvania Bookstore, 36th and Walnut Streets
Open to Public
Description

As corporations and countries square off for control of the Internet, the likely losers are us, unless we act to protect our freedoms.

Facebook, Flickr, Research in Motion, Yahoo, Ericsson, and Google: What do they have in common? They are technology companies that, while drawing the rhetoric of cyberutopianism, are nonetheless willing—even keen—to undermine the freedom of their users whenever it suits them. Many nations are no better: China, Russia, Iran, and even the United States spy on their citizens, crush free expression, and otherwise import all of government’s worst habits into the digital frontier.

In Consent of the Networked, Internet policy specialist Rebecca MacKinnon argues passionately and convincingly that it is time for us to claim respect and protection for our rights and freedoms before they are sold, legislated, programmed, and engineered away. As the Arab Spring has shown, it is possible to demand what’s ours. But we must start now—time is running out.

Rebecca MacKinnon is Cofounder of Global Voices Online and a Fellow at the New America Foundation. MacKinnon is frequently interviewed by major media, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, Financial Times, National Public Radio, BBC, and other news outlets. She lives in Washington, DC.

This event is being presented by the Spring 2012 CGCS Seminar Series, “Internet Policy Formation: Global Actors, Global Outcomes”

March 2012
Playgrounds or Education?: Notes on the Implementation of the Right of All Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009
Speaker Chinki Sinha, Journalist, New Delhi and CASI Winter 2012 Visiting Fellow
Event/Type Seminar
Date March 15, 2012 - March 15, 2012
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Center for the Advanced Study of India, 3600 Market Street, Suite 560 (5th floor)
Ticketing RSVP by Tuesday, March 13 to casi@sas.upenn.edu
Description

Chinki Sinha is a journalist based in New Delhi. She worked for The Indian Express and covered a range of issues including primary education and the Right of All Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009. She finished her Master’s in journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University, and worked at the Utica Observer-Dispatch, a mid-size newspaper in New York state. There, she covered education and minority communities, including refugees and issues of integration in schools for people in exile.

During her years in the U.S., Ms. Sinha also wrote on Islamic schools in the post 9/11 world. She moved to India in 2008 to work at The Indian Express and traveled extensively to rural areas to report on school education and other issues. Ms. Sinha is interested in social rights and their implementation, and access to opportunities for the poor. She has also written on a range of other issues like the identity project being implemented in India, and focuses on narrative form to cover such issues. At The Indian Express, Ms. Sinha wrote about the issues of the Urdu medium schools and the minority community’s struggles to access higher education opportunities. Additionally, she covered the travesty that nursery school admissions have become in the national capital where issues of access arise with the point system that private and unaided schools have manipulated to keep the children belonging to the lower income groups out of the schools.

This event is co-sponsored by CASI and the Annenberg School's Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS)

For more information, click here.

SOPA/PIPA and the Future of Internet Politics, Policy, and Digital Copyright Legislation
Event/Type A panel discussion with activists, experts, and industry representatives
Date March 20, 2012 - March 20, 2012
Time 1:30-3:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

On January 18, the world watched as more than 7,000 websites, including internet giants such as Google, Wikipedia, and Reddit, coordinated service blackouts, online protests, and petition-signing campaigns in order to galvanize public opposition to the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and its Senate counterpart, the Protect IP Act (PIPA)--legislation proposed to expand the scope of U.S. law surrounding online infringement of copyrighted intellectual property. Supporters of the legislation argued that SOPA and PIPA would guard against copyright infringement on the internet, thus protecting various content-related industries and jobs. Opponents of the legislation asserted that provisions in both SOPA and PIPA would create liabilities for U.S.-based internet startups and entrepreneurs, stifle the growth of the internet industry, and threaten the First Amendment rights of internet users by moving the web towards unprecedented levels of censorship and government control.

Largely in response to these protests, both SOPA and PIPA were shelved in the House and the Senate. Despite this temporary resolution, the major issue underlying both SOPA and PIPA still remains: How can legislators and policymakers frame internet policy so that it protects intellectual property while ensuring that it does not violate the First Amendment and hinder growth and innovation in the internet industry?

Please join us for a panel discussion on the future of internet politics, policy, and digital copyright legislation, hosted by the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication. The discussion will include Craig Aaron, President and CEO of Free Press; Kartik Hosanagar, Associate Professor of Internet Commerce at the Wharton School; Stanley Pierre-Louis, Vice President and Associate General Counsel for Intellectual Property and Content Protection at Viacom Inc; Eric K. Clemons, Professor of Operations and Information Management at the Wharton School; and Sascha Meinrath, Director of the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Initiative. The discussion will be moderated by Monroe Price, Director of CGCS at Annenberg.

 To RSVP, please email Laura Schwartz-Henderson

This event is being presented by the Spring 2012 CGCS Seminar Series, “Internet Policy Formation: Global Actors, Global Outcomes”

ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series: "Designing User Interfaces for Novice and Low-Literacy Users"
Speaker Indrani Medhi
Event/Type Seminar
Date March 22, 2012 - March 22, 2012
Time 4:00- 6:00 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

Abstract: One of the greatest challenges in developing Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) for global development is that 41% of the population in the least developed countries is non-literate and even the literate among the poor are only novice users of technology. I will describe work we have done over the past 6 years in Text-Free User Interfaces. Text-Free UIs are design principles and recommendations for computer-human interfaces that would allow a first-time, non-literate person, on first contact with a PC or a mobile phone, to immediately realize useful interaction with minimal or no external assistance. Through an ethnographic design and iterative prototyping process and rigorous user evaluations, involving more than 700 hours of field work and 570 study participants from low-income, low-literate communities across India, the Philippines and South Africa, we established design principles that could apply to UIs for non-literate groups new to ICTs.

Bio: Indrani Medhi is an Associate Researcher in the Technology for Emerging Markets Group at Microsoft Research India in Bangalore. Her research interest is in the area of Ethnographic UI Design and Technology for Socio-Economic Development. Her current work has been in UIs for Novice and Low-Literate Users. She has a Masters degree in Design from Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. Currently, she is also a 4th year Ph.D. student at the Industrial Design Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, (IIT Bombay), India. In 2010, Indrani was listed in the MIT Technology Review's TR35 list of "outstanding innovators" under the age of 35 and featured in the list of "50 Smartest People in Technology" in 2010 by Fortune magazine.

Milton Wolf Seminar
Event/Type Conference
Date March 26, 2012 - March 28, 2012
Location Vienna, Austria
Description

Milton Wolf Seminar 2012

Transitions Transformed: Ideas of Information and Democracy post-2011

March 26-28, 2012
Diplomatic Academy of Vienna

The 2012 Milton Wolf Seminar will investigate the evolving relationship between media and democratic transition in light of the shifting structure and dynamics of the international communication system. Using case studies such as Hungary, Iran, Syria, Egypt, and Tunisia, the 2012 Milton Wolf Seminar will investigate the evolving relationship between media and democratic transition in light of rapid technological change and the shifting structure and dynamics of the international communication system.  Distinguished panelists and participants will include those working for state and multi-lateral organizations, journalists, media development practitioners, academics, polling professionals, and a select group of highly engaged graduate students interested in the seminar themes.

The program is being organized by the American Austrian Foundation and undertaken under the academic leadership of the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania and the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna.

For more information about Milton Wolf 2012 and the 2012 Distinguished Student Delegate Scholarship progam, please click here.

Hyperactive Journalism: The India Examples
Speaker Chinki Sinha
Event/Type Seminar
Date March 26, 2012 - March 26, 2012
Time 12:00- 1:30PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 300
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

With more than 600 registered television channels, India boasts the world’s third largest TV market (after China and the United States). A large percentage of these are “breaking news” channels that broadcast “urgent” news stories throughout the day. A great many channels are increasing this breaking news programming in order to tap into a larger viewership. In this way, these news channels have become “hyperactive”—sensationalizing issues, distorting facts, and manufacturing news. The result is a chaotic world of television news, blurring the lines between what is real and what is imaginary.

In this talk, Chinki Sinha will discuss two recent episodes of hyperactivism she has covered as a journalist in India: the September 2010 coverage of a hypothesized deluge in Delhi that led to widespread panic in the region, and the recent "Anna Hazare movement," where a 73-year-old man’s fast to create pressure for what he termed as a peoples' version of the pending anti-corruption bill received enormous journalistic attention and partisanship, turning him into a wildly popular hero.  

Chinki Sinha is a journalist based in New Delhi. She worked for The Indian Express from 2008 until 2011. She holds a Master’s in journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University, and has worked at the Utica Observer-Dispatch. Ms. Sinha is currently a visiting scholar at the Center for the Advanced Study of India. While at Penn, she will be working on issues of access to education and social rights for the poor, in particular looking at the 2009 Right to Education Act in the context of lower-income groups.

ICT4D: In Whose Interests?
Speaker Dr. Tim Unwin, CEO of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation
Event/Type Seminar
Date March 29, 2012 - March 29, 2012
Time 4:30- 6:00
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP
Description

Abstract: This seminar explores some of the taken for granted assumptions about the use of Information and Communication Technologies for Development, focusing particularly on the interests that gave rise both to the concept and to the activities delivered in its name. It argues that all too often ICT4D initiatives have failed to deliver on the real needs of poor people and marginalised communities, and that ICTs have to date frequently actually tended to increase inequalities at a range of scales rather than reduce them. Having established the divisive character of such technologies, the seminar will then examine ways through which such technologies might indeed be used creatively and disruptively to change the balances of power that underlie such inequalities, drawing particularly on research in Africa and Asia undertaken over the last decade. It concludes by arguing that while the market may provide for the majority, states have a crucial role to play in ensuring that the benefits of ICTs can indeed be experienced by everyone in any given society, and that multi-stakeholder partnerships have a particularly important role in achieving this.

About the Speaker: Tim Unwin (born 1955) is Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation (http://www.cto.int), Chair of the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission in the UK ( http://cscuk.dfid.gov.uk), UNESCO Chair in ICT4D, and Emeritus Professor of Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London. From 2001-2004 he led the UK Prime Minister’s Imfundo: Partnership for IT in Education initiative based within the Department for International Development, and from 2007-2011 he was Director and then Senior Advisor to the World Economic Forum’s Partnerships for Education initiative with UNESCO. He was previously Head of the Department of Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London (1999–2001), and has also served as Honorary Secretary of the Royal Geographical Society (with The Institute of British Geographers) (1995-1997). He has written or edited 15 books, and more than 200 papers and other publications, including "Wine and the Vine" (Routledge, 1991), "The Place of Geography" (Longman, 1992), as well as his edited "Atlas of World Development" (Wiley, 1994) and "European Geography" (Longman, 1998). His recent research has concentrated on information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D), focusing especially on the use of ICTs to support people with disabilities, and to empower out of school youth. In 2011, he spent three months in China teaching and undertaking research on the use of mobile devices for learning by farmers in Gansu and people with disabilities in Beijing. His latest collaborative book, entitled simply ICT4D, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2009. He is a Fellow of Education Impact and Honorary Professor at Lanzhou University, China.

http://unwin.wordpress.com
http://twitter.com/timunwin
http://www.ictd.org.uk

For more information about the ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series, please click here

ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series:
Speaker Dr. Tim Unwin, CEO of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation
Event/Type Seminar
Date March 29, 2012 - March 29, 2012
Time 4:30- 6:00
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

Abstract: This seminar explores some of the taken for granted assumptions about the use of Information and Communication Technologies for Development, focusing particularly on the interests that gave rise both to the concept and to the activities delivered in its name. It argues that all too often ICT4D initiatives have failed to deliver on the real needs of poor people and marginalised communities, and that ICTs have to date frequently actually tended to increase inequalities at a range of scales rather than reduce them. Having established the divisive character of such technologies, the seminar will then examine ways through which such technologies might indeed be used creatively and disruptively to change the balances of power that underlie such inequalities, drawing particularly on research in Africa and Asia undertaken over the last decade. It concludes by arguing that while the market may provide for the majority, states have a crucial role to play in ensuring that the benefits of ICTs can indeed be experienced by everyone in any given society, and that multi-stakeholder partnerships have a particularly important role in achieving this.

About the Speaker: Tim Unwin (born 1955) is Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation (http://www.cto.int), Chair of the Commonwealth Scholarship Commission in the UK ( http://cscuk.dfid.gov.uk), UNESCO Chair in ICT4D, and Emeritus Professor of Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London. From 2001-2004 he led the UK Prime Minister’s Imfundo: Partnership for IT in Education initiative based within the Department for International Development, and from 2007-2011 he was Director and then Senior Advisor to the World Economic Forum’s Partnerships for Education initiative with UNESCO. He was previously Head of the Department of Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London (1999–2001), and has also served as Honorary Secretary of the Royal Geographical Society (with The Institute of British Geographers) (1995-1997). He has written or edited 15 books, and more than 200 papers and other publications, including "Wine and the Vine" (Routledge, 1991), "The Place of Geography" (Longman, 1992), as well as his edited "Atlas of World Development" (Wiley, 1994) and "European Geography" (Longman, 1998). His recent research has concentrated on information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D), focusing especially on the use of ICTs to support people with disabilities, and to empower out of school youth. In 2011, he spent three months in China teaching and undertaking research on the use of mobile devices for learning by farmers in Gansu and people with disabilities in Beijing. His latest collaborative book, entitled simply ICT4D, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2009. He is a Fellow of Education Impact and Honorary Professor at Lanzhou University, China.

http://unwin.wordpress.com
http://twitter.com/timunwin
http://www.ictd.org.uk

April 2012
Penn Museum First Sunday Culture Film Series: Tehran Has No More Pomegranates
Speaker Pardis Minuchehr
Event/Type screening and talk
Date April 1, 2012 - April 1, 2012
Time 2:00-3:30 PM
Location Rainey Auditorium, Penn Museum
Description

Penn Museum is pleased to announce a film series addressing the theme of cultural adaptation. This month's film, Tehran Has No More Pomegranates, offers a portrait of Tehran in Iran as it was and as it continues to change, a view nearly unseen in the west. Massoud Bakhshi, the film's director, uses archival footage, an original visual approach and a lively soundtrack to take the viewer through 150 years of Tehran’s history. 

Dr. Pardis Minuchehr, Middle East Studies Professor at George Washington University, will introduce the film and lead discussion afterwards. All programs are free with Museum admission donation. 

For more information, please visit http://www.penn.museum/culturefilms

ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series:
Speaker Daniel Andler, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Institut universitaire de France & Ecole normale supérieure
Event/Type Seminar
Date April 5, 2012 - April 5, 2012
Time 4:00- 6:00 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 109
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

It has become clear that technology makes a real difference to education only under certain conditions, and the problem has become to identify not just what works, but what makes what works work. The usual constraints on adoption of innovations are operative, but education is a very special case involving a resilient ecology on which innovations brought from the outside are seldom able to leave a significant mark. The key then perhaps is to work from the inside, to colonize pre-existing tools and practices and reroute them towards educational goals.

In formal school systems of advanced countries, this is a complex process which, though extensively studied and experimented, eludes our understanding. Things look more hopeful in the case of out-of-school education in developing countries. Still, we cannot assume that any old bright idea is going to work: we must try and assess its chances beforehand. So basic research is necessary, but so is translational research. Medicine may have some lessons in this regard.

Daniel Andler's group, allied to a major publisher of traditional educational material, has drafted a project to use mobile phones in francophone Africa to teach French where people live and work. Dr. Andler will describe the project and use it as an illustration of a colonizing strategy which shows promise elsewhere, focusing on why it might work if it does work.

Daniel Andler is a logician and philosopher of science specializing in the foundations of cognitive science. A professor of philosophy at Sorbonne, he has been active in the construction of cognitive science in France, and created the Department of Cognitive Studies at École normale supérieure in Paris. An experienced teacher of mathematics, then philosophy, he got interested in the question of what cognitive science could bring to education and to the use of technology for educational purposes. In 2006 he founded Compas, an interdisciplinary think-tank, where this question is explored in the wider philosophical, political, economical and cultural context of educational change in the global society.

http://andler.dec.ens.fr/

http://www.groupe-compas.net/

*Please note location change

ICT4D@Penn Seminar Series: "Using Mobile Technology to Provide Specialty Care and Education to Remote Communities in the Developing World"
Speaker Carrie Kovarik, Assistant Professor of Dermatology, Dermatopathology, and Infectious Diseases, Perelman School of Medicine
Event/Type Seminar
Date April 26, 2012 - April 26, 2012
Time 4:00- 6:00 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

Throughout the developing world, inadequate access to physicians, subspecialty care, and medical information resources are serious problems that telemedicine can help address. The new field of mobile telemedicine allows medical consultations to be submitted via mobile phone (mHealth), enabling health care to reach rural areas, where cell phone coverage extends beyond computer networks. The mhealth program that we have established in Botswana will be highlighted, including the use of mobile phones for cervical cancer screening, dermatology, radiology, and oral medicine consultation, and well as for medical education. Methods for sustainability and local ownership will be discussed.

Carrie L. Kovarik, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Dermatology, Dermatopathology, and Infectious Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kovarik has a special interest in tropical, infectious, and HIV-related dermatology. Dr. Kovarik is the Head of Dermatology, as well as Telemedicine and Informatics, for the Botswana-UPenn Partnership. She is also the primary dermatology consultant for the Baylor International Pediatrics AIDS Initiative (BIPAI) in Africa. Dr. Kovarik has created an African teledermatology consult service (africa.telederm.org) which is a collaborative effort between BIPAI, the American Academy of Dermatology, twelve African countries, and several other institutions. Recently, the teledermatology website/application has been translated into Spanish, and programs are underway to expand teledermatology services in Mexico and Central America. Dr. Kovarik has also been working to expand telemedicine services in Africa and Central America through the use of cellular phones. Dr. Kovarik has started an initiative in global health at the University of Pennsylvania, and she is the Director of the Penn Dermatology Global Health Program. Dr. Kovarik is also the Chair of the Residents' International Grant Work Group within the AAD and received funding to send over 60 senior dermatology residents in 2008-2012 to participate in 4-6 week rotations on the dermatology consult service in Botswana.

May 2012
Teaching ICT Policy Skills
Event/Type Course
Date May 14, 2012 - May 18, 2012
Location Central European University: Budapest, Hungary
Description

Call for Applications: Teaching ICT Policy Skills

Central European University

Budapest, Hungary

May 14-18, 2012

Application deadline: March 11, 2012

The Center for Global Communication Studies is pleased to announce a call for applications for a course on Teaching ICT Policy Skills, to be held May 14-18 at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary.

Applications are welcome from faculty members at accredited higher education institutions interested in enhancing the curricula of their home institutions in public policy and law by developing interest and teaching capacity in ICT policy skills. Successful applicants who are citizens of the former Soviet Union, South-Eastern Europe, and Mongolia will receive full funding for their participation. A good command of written and spoken English is required.

“Teaching ICT Policy Skills” provides participants with an opportunity to enhance the curricula of their home institutions in public policy and law by developing interest and teaching capacity in ICT policy skills. The session aims to promote a critical, analytic, and innovative study of the complex and often conflicting public policy demands of the ICT sector, and to introduce participants to the basic principles underpinning international telecommunications laws.

The session intends to approach the topic from an interdisciplinary, comparative perspective; to build analytic skills to understand and critically engage with current policy debates about ICT; to survey how some of the newest industries and technologies function and are regulated; and to present an overview of policy developments and regulations throughout the region. It will also provide participants with practical skills in curriculum design, development and implementation.

More information on the program, and the online application, is available at http://web.ceu.hu/crc/crc_visit_upc.html. Applications are due March 11.

 This program is being run in conjunction with CGCS’s ICT Policy and Training Initiative (IPTI) in Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Questions about the application process should be directed to CEU’s Curriculum Resource Center (crc@ceu.hu); questions about the program should be directed to the Center for Global Communication Studies, Attn: Briar Smith (bsmith@asc.upenn.edu). 

June 2012
CGCS Fall 2012 Internship Program Application
Event/Type Call for Application
Date June 7, 2012 - August 1, 2012
Description

The Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication is offering an internship opportunity to qualified candidates who are looking to gain experience and knowledge in the field of international comparative media law and policy. This internship is open to students, recent grads, and early professionals interested in global communication issues and media development. The internship will be paid at a rate of $11/hour.

Duties include, but are not limited to:

  • Assisting the CGCS staff with research, writing and editing reports, copyediting book chapters and other studies.
  •  Compiling the Center's weekly newsletter and other correspondence, as well as editing news analysis for the Iran Media Program.
  • Creating and editing announcements for the Center's other activities.
  • Creating blog posts, editing and updating the CGCS blog. Assisting with website and social network maintenance.
  • Conference planning and support, helping book hotels and airfare, creating information packets, tracking conference participants, etc.
  • Creating and maintaining excel files for expenses and finances. Executing minor administrative tasks as needed.

Qualifications:

  • Enrollment in an undergraduate or graduate program, or a Bachelors degree.
  • Proven research and analytical skills.
  • Familiarity with research tools, such as Lexis-Nexis, JSTOR, etc.
  • Strong writing and editing abilities.
  • Ability to multitask in a fast-paced environment.
  • Attention to detail. CGCS cannot sponsor visas for this internship.
  • Applicants need to have authorization to work in the U.S..

For questions and inquiries, please contact Laura S. Henderson at lsh@asc.upenn.edu.

 

APPLY HERE by August 1st.

New Directions for Growth, Regulation and Policy: Broadband and Mobile for the Western CIS Region
Event/Type Workshop
Date June 12, 2012 - June 15, 2012
Location Chisinau, Moldova
Description

The Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania and the Ministry of Information Technology and Communications of the Republic of Moldova are pleased to announce a four-day ICT policy workshop for government officials and business leaders on New Directions for Growth, Regulation, Public Policy: Broadband and Mobile for the Western CIS Region, to be held in Chisinau, Moldova from June 12-15, 2012.

The growth of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) is a critical engine for trade, growth and competitiveness. Yet the development of ICT infrastructure sometimes accelerates ahead of the policymaking and regulatory environment. Governments are now tasked with the policy challenge of encouraging a more competitive ICT market and with providing a stable, innovation-friendly framework and legislative initiatives to support business and consumer needs.

Ideal participants are public officials, regulators and business leaders with experience or interest in developing policy vision, skills sets, and institutional design in the ICT field, as well as regulatory toolkits for development. The workshop will consist of two separate components: a fundamentals course, and an advanced topics course, with a total time of 4 days. We would hope that you can participate in the full 4 days of the course, but depending on your knowledge of the subject and your availability, you are welcome to participate in only the fundamentals course or the advanced course.

The workshop will be led by international trainers Judith Hellerstein and Sofia Mendoza, alongside regional and local experts. 

  • Judith Hellerstein is the President of Hellerstein & Associates, an ICT consulting group specializing in policy consulting, regulatory reform and capacity building, e-government assessment, convergence and its impact on regulatory frameworks, and in evaluation & assessment of the broadband marketplace. She has also organized workshops and trainings on competition policy, liberalization, convergence, e-government, e-Commerce, and the impact of disruptive technologies, and broadband policy issues for regulators and other high-level government officials in the US, Africa, and Latin America.
  • Sofia Abraham Mendoza is an international consultant and one of the lead trainers for IP3 on their Next Generation Technology Seminar and has trained regulators on a variety of Telecom issues such as trends in ICT, competition, convergence on the regulatory framework. Sofia is currently the Managing Director at GlobeInvent, an international non-profit dedicated to bring technological and scientific innovations to market. 

The topics of the courses to be taught during the workshop include:

Fundamentals Courses (June 12-13)

  • Effective leadership for policymakers, regulatory officials, and business professionals
  • Development of National Broadband Strategies
  • Funding for ICT and Broadband development and deployment
  • Institutional design and processes: Upgrading institutions for a more effective ICT policy

Advanced Courses (June 14-15)

  • Regulation & Competition Issues
  • Regulation of spectrum management, digital migration and digital divide
  • Open Access and Infrastructure sharing
  • Tools for e-Leaders, e-Government tools, Open Government plans, and governance issues
  • Internet Governance
  • Cyber Crime

 

For those participants who are based outside of Moldova or outside of Chisinau, all travel and accommodation expenses will be covered by the program and arranged by the organizers.

To apply, please send a brief statement of interest as well as a basic CV to Vitalie Tarlev at the Ministry of Information Technology and Communications (vitalie.tarlev@mtic.gov.md). Application materials can be in Russian or English.  Please also indicate in your email whether you are registering for the full course of the workshop (fundamentals and advanced), only the fundamentals, or only the advanced workshop days.  

The deadline to apply is May 28, 2012.

Summer Institute in Communication and Governance Reform
Event/Type Institute
Date June 16, 2012 - June 27, 2012
Location University of Southern California - Los Angeles
Description

The World Bank Institute's Governance Practice, the World Bank's External Affairs Operational Communications department, the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at the University of Southern California are pleased to announce the 2012 Summer Institute in Communication and Governance Reform. The course is designed for government/public sector officials or private sector advisors who want to build critical competencies in providing implementation support to change agents and reform leaders throughout government and civil society in developing countries.The 12-day program will equip participants with knowledge about the most recent advances in communication and proven techniques in reform implementation. The program's interdisciplinary approach and regional focus will serve as the foundation for building expert networks of incountry communication practitioners and professionals. Participants will develop core competencies essential to bringing about real change, leading to development results in a wider range of sectors.Participants will acquire critical skills in five key areas:

1. Interpreting governance diagnostics and political economy analyses.

2. Crafting multi-stakeholder coalition building strategies and tactics to support reform.

3. Providing communication skills that support the implementation on governance reforms.

4. Leveraging social/digital media tools and analytics effectively.

5. Developing communication metrics and applying monitoring and evaluation frameworks.

 

To apply and for more information, please visit the official website

Central European University's Summer University
Event/Type Summer Course
Date June 18, 2012 - June 29, 2012
Location Budapest, Hungary
Description

Recent events in Egypt and Tunisia remind us that the development of the internet as a global, free and open resource stands at a perpetual crossroads. The dynamic and decentralized nature of the internet, and other new technologies, continually offers new avenues for open communication and free expression as well as new challenges and threats. The strategic use of digital technologies and information tools with the goal of empowering civil society and building capacity for an open society is critical. At the same time, so-called ‘old media’ continues to play a vital role in communication, especially during times of crisis and conflict.

This intensive summer course is designed to help both researchers and activists gain new insights into the role which civil society can play in advocating for free expression online and communication policy change, and will highlight the opportunities and challenges of technologies and online tools for mobilizing and organizing constituencies and for enhancing the security and privacy of advocates. During the course, we will explore a wide range of practical and theoretical views related to communication policy advocacy and online tools and tactics, and how to integrate research into these fields. The course will include hands-on work in developing advocacy campaigns and seek to cover some of latest developments in online tools for advocacy, security, privacy and crowd-sourcing.  We will also look at Internet governance issues and online free expression policies. 

As part of the course, participants will also work in teams on a group assignment for the duration of the course. Each group will be presented with a case study for which they should develop an advocacy campaign for communication policy change. Each team will be required to prepare a written report (approximately 10-15 pages in total), and give a multi-media presentation to the group at the end of the course.

In order maximize the output and opportunities for participants the course will have a maximum of 20-25 students.  

Course Participants: This course is intended for practitioners, policy makers, media policy advocates, PhD students, advanced MA students, and media development professionals (drawing from government, civil society/NGOs, foundations), journalists and other media practitioners with a demonstrated interest in new media and technology and communication policy advocacy.  

For more information, visit the official summer school website

 

Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute
Date June 18, 2012 - June 29, 2012
Location Oxford, United Kingdom
Description

The Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford (PCMLP) are pleased to host the 14th annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute, to be held from Monday, June 18 to Friday, June 29, 2012 at the University of Oxford.

The annual summer institute brings together young scholars and regulators to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy. Participants come from around the world; countries represented at previous summer institute include Thailand, Kenya, China, Brazil, Egypt, Nigeria, Jordan, Italy and Bosnia, among others. 

This year the summer institute seeks, as part of the cohort, researchers and academics (PhD candidates and early career academics, for example), who will come with a research project related to the general subject of the seminar. Research generally related to the work of the Center for Global Communication Studies and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy is especially welcome, and some participants will be asked to present their research.

The seminars this year will focus on several key areas, including media governance in India and China and strategic communication in conflict and post-conflict and transitional environments, particularly in the Middle East and Africa. At the same time, the successful curriculum that has been the foundation of the program over the years will continue, with sessions covering global media policy issues such as media and economic/social development, freedom of information, internet regulation and convergence. Part of the course will be devoted to new developments in comparative approaches to regulation, looking at Ofcom in the UK and other agencies, including examples from the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

The seminar brings together a wide range of participants from around the globe and provides them with an environment in which significant policy issues are seriously discussed. The richness of the experience comes from exposure to a variety of speakers and from the discussions among participants themselves.

This year, Internews Network will again be offering twelve Media Policy Fellowships that cover tuition, housing, travel, and per diem for exceptional applicants who are engaged in research on media advocacy, reform, and implementation in post-conflict societies. For more information about the Internews Fellowships, please contact CGCS.

Applications for the 2012 program will be accepted via our online application form on a rolling basis through April 9, 2012. Please feel free to forward this email to anyone who you think might be interested.

For more information about the program, application instructions, and a link to the online application please click here.

If you need any further information please do not hesitate to contact us at lsh@asc.upenn.edu.

 

September 2012
Transnational Communication about Climate Change: Characteristics and Challenges of Climate Change Communication
Speaker Mike S. Schäfer, University of Hamburg
Event/Type Seminar
Date September 19, 2012 - September 19, 2012
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

Man-made climate change is widely seen as one of the main problems for the future of contemporary societies. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, rising temperatures will result in melting glaciers and rising sea levels, threaten ecosystems and biodiversity, and lead to more frequent extreme weather events; coastal erosion and floods might endanger human life; desertification and water scarcity could trigger climate-related migration and intensify regional conflicts.

The media are crucial agents in the production of the meaning of “climate change”, indicating the importance of the phenomenon and providing information about it. Accordingly, numerous studies from communications and related fields have analyzed media communication about climate change in past years.

In this presentation, Mike S. Schaefer will highlight results from these studies as well as research desiderata, pointing out open questions regarding credibility of science communication, regarding climate communication in online and social media environments, and regarding the analysis of
international communication about climate change. Dr. Schaefer will then elaborate on the latter of these open questions: After describing the transnational character of climate change, he will present results from ongoing research which compares media representations of climate change from different countries around the world. Drawing from theoretical discussions about an emerging transnational
public sphere, he will present a heuristic model of such a public sphere and apply it empirically on a large corpus of print media coverage.

October 2012
Rethinking Tunisia's Media in the Wake of Its Arab Spring
Speaker Joan Barata
Event/Type Seminar
Date October 3, 2012 - October 3, 2012
Time 12:00-1:30PM
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

Tunisia is the first country of the Arab Spring that has been able to organize plural, open and internationally-accepted legislative elections within a reasonable timeframe. A new Constitution has to be drafted and approved by the new democratic Assembly. Moreover, the new interim authorities undertook the preparation of a new legal regulatory framework in the field of freedom of expression, press regulation and audiovisual media services regulation, including the creation of an audiovisual regulatory authority. After a long period of exercising their profession within the constraints of an authoritarian regime, where information was controlled, manipulated and, if unorthodox, repressed by the State, journalists are now going through a true catharsis.

Concepts like professionalism, objectivity, rigor, the following of professional norms and ethics, and the elaboration and assimilation of editorial rules based on professional criteria are completely new and still have not been fully understood and taken on by journalists. Tunisia is a clear case in the Arab world in which the liberalization process already introduced by Ben Ali did not bring neither economic competition nor political and social pluralism. The challenges now being faced in order to guarantee the developement of a true, open and pluralistic public sphere are extremely complicated.

Joan Barata is a Professor of Communication Law and Vice Dean of International Relations at Blanquerna Communication School (Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona). He was a Professor at the University of Barcelona (2001-2005), the Open University of Catalonia (since 1997) and the Universitat PompeuFabra (2010-2011), as well as visiting scholar at the University of Bologna (Italy) (2003) and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law (New York) (2003-2004).

His writings and research interests include topics such as freedom of expression, media regulation,public service broadcasting and poltical and legal media transitions. He has provided assistance to several institutions and organizations regarding these issues in countries such as Thailand, Morocco, Tunisia, Lebanon, Jordan, Albania, Hungary, Dominican Republic,Colombia and the United States. In particular, his recent writings on Tunisia have been commissioned by Internews. He has been Head of President's Cabinet (2005-2009) and Secretary General of the Catalonia Audiovisual Council (2009-2011). He has also provided assistance to the OSCE (2004) and the Council of Europe (2012).

Hungarian media laws versus European freedom of expression standards: what is at stake?
Speaker Amy Brouillette & Joan Barata
Event/Type Seminar
Date October 4, 2012 - October 4, 2012
Time 12:00-1:30PM
Location Silverman 49
Description

Thursday, October 4th, 2012 

 12:00- 1:30 PM
 Silverman 49   

3501 Sansom Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 

Brown Bag Lunch

In 2010, Hungarian lawmakers stirred international controversy by passing new media laws that critics say threaten media freedom and violate democratic principles and norms. The legislation was fast-tracked through the Hungarian Parliament amid mounting protests from domestic and international free-press groups, journalists and European lawmakers. Numerous legal analyses have shown that the laws are inconsistent with European media-regulation practices and standards, and violate the fundamental freedom of expression rights established by various European treaties, including the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The European Parliament, the European Commission, the Council of Europe and the OSCE continue to pressure Hungarian officials to bring the legislation in line with European standards. But several rounds of amendments have brought only minor changes, leaving the most problematic aspects of the legislation intact.

The debate over the Hungarian media legislation goes beyond immediate concerns over the possible erosion of media freedom in Hungary: the laws pose a clear challenge to the established European framework for the protection of democratic principles, values and rights. Hungary’s case therefore raises serious concerns over whether, and how, these fundamental rights can be safeguarded and maintained on both the domestic and pan-European levels.

BIO INFO

Amy Brouillette is a research fellow at the Center for Media and Communication Studies (CMCS) at the Central European University in Budapest. She was the lead researcher of a recently published study, “Hungarian Media Laws in Europe: An Assessment of the Consistency of Hungary’s Media Laws with European Practices and Norms,” which examined in the Hungarian legislation in a comparative context across 20 European and EU-member countries. She has worked as both an on-staff and freelance journalist for more than ten years, reporting for daily, weekly and online U.S.-based publications. Her articles and photography have appeared in the Columbia Journalism Review, The Los Angeles Times and The Denver Post. She holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado, Boulder (2007), and a master’s degree in Central European history from CEU (2009). She is currently a visiting scholar at the Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS).

Joan Barata is a Professor of Communication Law and Vice Dean of International Relations at Blanquerna Communication School (Universitat Ramon Llull, Barcelona). He was a Professor at the University of Barcelona (2001-2005), the Open University of Catalonia (since 1997) and the Universitat PompeuFabra (2010-2011), as well as visiting scholar at the University of Bologna (Italy) (2003) and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law (New York) (2003-2004). His writings and research interests include topics such as freedom of expression, media regulation, public service broadcasting and political and legal media transitions. He has provided assistance to several institutions and organizations regarding these issues in countries such as Thailand, Morocco, Tunisia, Lebanon, Jordan, Albania, Hungary, Dominican Republic, Colombia and the United States. In particular, his recent writings on Tunisia have been commissioned by Internews. He has been Head of President's Cabinet (2005-2009) and Secretary General of the Catalonia Audiovisual Council (2009-2011). He has also provided assistance to the OSCE (2004) and the Council of Europe (2012).

 

Chinese Law Reform: Its Recent Past and Uncertain Future
Speaker Stanley Lubman
Event/Type Seminar
Date October 25, 2012 - October 25, 2012
Time 12 noon
Location Silverstein Forum, first floor Stiteler Hall
Description

Stanley Lubman, Berkeley Law School, University of California; Senior Fellow, Miller Institute for Global Challenges and the Law Professor Lubman reviews the problems that law reform has encountered since the millennium, especially emphasizing the continuing tightness of control by the Party-State over the courts, the extensive power of local governments over local courts and the enforcement of central government laws and regulations (e.g., in failing to control food safety and hampering the application of environmental regulations), and the lack of improvement in the criminal process. He will also call attention to improvements in administrative law.

Lubman has specialized on China as a scholar and as a practicing lawyer for almost 50 years. He first taught at Berkeley from 1967-1974, and returned in 2002. In the meantime, he taught at Stanford, Columbia, Harvard, the University of Heidelberg, and the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London.

Lubman has advised American, European and Japanese clients on the People's Republic of China since 1972 on a wide range of matters, and he has also represented clients in disputes arbitrated by the China International Economic and Trade Arbitration Commission in Beijing. From 1978 to 1997 he headed the China practices at two major San Francisco law firms and a large English firm of solicitors. Since 1997 he has devoted his time to scholarly research, teaching and non-profit activities. He also writes an online column that appears regularly on China Real Time Report-the Wall Street Journal http://blogs.wsj.com/chinarealtime/

He was advisor on China legal projects to The Asia Foundation from 2001 to 2011. In that capacity, he organized committees of U.S. experts to consult with Chinese counterparts. And worked on a number of law reform projects in China related to administrative procedure.

He was trained as a China specialist in the United States and in Hong Kong for four years (1963-67) under grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, Columbia University, and the Foreign Area Fellowship Program. He has an A.B. degree with honors in history from Columbia College and LL.B., LL.M., and J.S.D. degrees from the Columbia Law School. He has also studied at the Faculty of Law and the Institute of Comparative Law of the University of Paris.

His writings on Chinese law and related subjects have been widely published and include China's Legal Reforms (Lubman, ed.), Oxford University Press, 1996; Bird in a Cage: Legal Reform in China after Mao, Stanford University Press, 2000; Engaging the Law in China: State, Society, and Possibilities for Justice (co-edited with Neil J. Diamant and Kevin O'Brien, Stanford University Press 2005), and The Evolution of Law Reform in China: Pursuing an Uncertain Path, Elgar Publishing, forthcoming, 2012.

For more information: https://cscc.sas.upenn.edu/

November 2012
From Production to Promotion: Persian rugs and the Reinvention of National Technologies
Speaker Narges Erami
Event/Type Seminar
Date November 8, 2012 - November 8, 2012
Time 12:00-1:30PM
Location In room 300, Annenberg School for Communication
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

The official Iranian Carpet Company (ICC), with the full weight of the Islamic Republic of Iran behind it, has become a promotional vehicle for Persian rugs as art/commodity (hunar/kala). The international competition in the rug market has forced the state to implement aggressive promotion strategies for Persian carpets. As Persian rugs signify what is considered “traditional” in Iran - from craftsmanship to art form, from weavers to dealers and producers who are involved in the rug community, the policies have undergone dramatic shifts in order to reflect modern Iranian state’s ideology of what “represents” Iran globally.

The ICC has struggled to maintain standards that elevate the Persian rug to an art form and promote “traditional” craftsmanship while providing state of the art technologies to refashion and modernize the industry. From its inception, the ICC has been intrinsically tied to the modernizing ventures of Reza Shah, the deposed Shah’s father. The ICC was also set apart from the traditional forum of the bazaar and the bazaaris. A combination of political, social and economic ventures led the ICC to be shaped into a “modern” rug industry.

In this presentation Dr. Erami will provide an analysis of Iran’s anxiety about how Persian rugs should be represented and promoted to the outside world and will reflect on the clashes between Iranian rug producers as well as their objections to being marginalized by government agents during discussions over these new policies. The contemporary vision of Persian rugs is still being debated today and is emblematic of the changes occurring in Iranian society, leading to questions referencing the role technologies play in communicating a nation’s “traditional” handicrafts to the rest of the world.

Narges Erami is assistant professor of anthropology and International and Area studies at Yale University. She received her MA in Middle East Studies from The University of Chicago in 1998 and PhD in anthropology from Columbia University in 2009. She primarily works on the relationship between economy and religion and how it is played out in rituals of everyday life. Her work is centered in the Holy city of Qum in Iran. Her forthcoming book, "The Soul of the Bazaar," is a historical and ethnographic study of carpet merchants and the process of self-fashioning through the acquisition of specialized knowledge. Her current research continues to be focused in Qum, examining the cultural production of authority and knowledge through publications of Islamic texts and their global circulation. Her publications include an entry on Islam in the Encyclopedia of Social Sciences and forthcoming articles on smuggling, temporary marriage and the language of the marketplace.

 

Networks of Political Mobilization: How Digital Media Channels Communication and Triggers Participation
Speaker Sandra González-Bailón, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford
Event/Type Seminar
Date November 9, 2012 - November 9, 2012
Time 11:45-1:00pm
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

The year 2011 was punctuated by the emergence of political protests in several countries around the world. Most news reports of these events highlighted the prominent role of social media in the emergence and coordination of the protests, consolidating as conventional wisdom the idea that online social networks are inherently linked to social unrest and popularizing expressions like “Facebook Revolution” and “Twitter Revolution” as shorthand for the uprisings.  However, there are many open questions about how these and other online networks facilitate the emergence and the diffusion of protests. This talk will consider the mechanisms through which online networks mediate collective action using evidence from the protests that took place in Spain in May 2011, which were partly inspired by the events in the MENA region and acted as a precursor of the Occupy campaign. The data tracks the communication patterns in one online network (Twitter) of close to 90 thousand people over the period of one month, involving the exchange of more than half a million protest-related messages. The analysis of this longitudinal data set illuminates two aspects of the mobilizations: how online networks facilitated the recruitment of protesters, and how they channelled the diffusion of information. Results focus on the dynamics of threshold activation and the effects of network topology on information cascades. This research qualifies classic approaches to collective action, and sheds light into how interpersonal communication can trigger political participation.

Police Administration in India: Delivery Dysfunction
Speaker Anjana Sinha
Event/Type Seminar
Date November 9, 2012 - November 9, 2012
Time 12 noon to 1:30 p.m.
Location Center for the Advanced Study of India (CASI) 3600 Market Street, Suite 560 (5th floor) Philadelphia, PA 19104-2653
Description

ANJANA SINHA is a security and security reform practitioner with over twenty years of field and management experience in India. She entered the federal police force in 1990. Currently, she is Inspector General Communications in Andhra Pradesh, India.


Ms. Sinha has worked in a strategic advisory capacity with the UN in Bosnia-Herzegovina (UNMIB&H) to coordinate human rights investigations and to train international security
corps as part of that UN mandate. Subsequently, she has served as the nodal person for the UNODC with Indian Police on the global campaign on anti-humantrafficking. As Chief of Police, she has neutralized 20 ultra-left guerilla groups. As part of the security for the Afro Asian Games in 2003, she has coordinated security for 117 countries. In 1992, she prevented the outbreak of violence in her jurisdiction when communal violence raged across India after the raising of the Babri Mosque by right-wing activists. With a track record of performance in conflict and pre- and post-conflict situations in challenging socio-political and politically sensitive regimes, she has held several executive and leadership positions in tackling guerilla warfare and religious fundamentalists. Ms. Sinha brings extensive experience in execution and management of law and order and public security using multi-cultural and multidisciplinary frameworks.

Ms. Sinha earned a BA in History from Lady Shri Ram College, Delhi University, an MA in International Politics from Jawaharlal Nehru University in Delhi, and an MBA from the Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore with a specialization in Public Policy. In 2010, she was awarded the British Foreign and Commonwealth Chevening Fellowship in Peacekeeping and International Capacity Building at Bradford University, England. Ms. Sinha resides in India with her husband, a professor, and her son, a rising senior in Delhi University.

Rumor as Political Communication in Modern Iran
Speaker Dr. Pedram Partovi
Event/Type Seminar
Date November 14, 2012 - November 14, 2012
Time 12:00-1:30PM
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

In this talk, Dr. Pedram Partovi will consider the place of rumor in recent Iranian history.  In general, scholars have associated the work of rumor with pre-modern societies---before the emergence of national ideologies or mass political organization (with the mass media contributing to these phenomena).  However, rumor has held a vital role in political communication and mobilization in modern Iran. Some attribute the rumor's prominence in Iran to its "underdeveloped" political culture. Dr. Partovi argues that this dependence on rumor can be linked to the prevalence of authoritarian political systems in Iran since before the Second World War---a situation that development experts and Western leaders had initially accepted and encouraged.  Thus, the public has been largely dependent on rumors for stories of local and national concern considered unfit for print or broadcast. Frequently, these rumors are then reported in the press and on state broadcasts.  It is in part through this inversion of the news process that the general public has been drawn into national politics.

This talk will examine the work of rumors and their media representations during four critical events of the past thirty years---the Islamic revolution of 1978--1979, the death and succession of Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989, the 1999 student revolts, and the 2009 post-election crisis.

His research interests focus on the ways in which pre-modern social practices and institutions are reworked through the mass media to make sense of the present in Iran and wider Persianate world.

Subnationalism and Social Development: A Comparative Analysis of Indian States
Speaker Prerna Singh, Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Harvard University
Event/Type Penn Political Science Department Comparative Politics Workshop Co-sponsored with CASI
Date November 15, 2012 - November 15, 2012
Time 12 noon to 1:30 p.m.
Location Silverstein Forum at Stiteler Hall University of Pennsylvania 208 S. 37th Street Philadelphia, PA 19104
Description

Why do people in some places experience far higher levels of social development than others? In a world in which millions of people, particularly in developing countries, continue to lead lives plagued by illiteracy and ill-health, understanding the conditions under which social development does or does not occur is of critical importance to political scientists and policy makers alike. Drawing on a study of the stark variations in educational and health outcomes among Indian states, this talk develops a theory of political community as a powerful determinant of public policy and collective action in multi-ethnic democracies.

Values-at-Play in Technology Design
Speaker Helen Nissenbaum
Event/Type Lecture
Date November 20, 2012 - November 20, 2012
Time 5:15 – 6:15pm
Location Room 109
Description

Technology and politics, media and message, code and law: these juxtapositions have occupied the social study of technology and media for decades. They have fired debates over whether politics are in artifacts or merely in their use or interpretation; they have inspired new theories and carefully drawn case studies -- from highway overpasses to web search engines. Values-at-Play, the subject of Nissenbaum’s talk, takes a practical turn; it addresses how, not whether, values might be absorbed into design practice.  It is a framework for the conscientious designer to approach, systematically, the question of values, alongside material and functional considerations. Developed initially for digital games, values-at-play is applicable to a wide range of sociotechnical systems, including digital media.


Helen Nissenbaum is Professor of Media, Culture and Communication, and Computer Science, at New York University, where she is also Senior Faculty Fellow of the Information Law Institute. Nissenbaum holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford University and a B.A. (Hons) from the University of the Witwatersrand. Her areas of expertise span social, ethical, and political implications of information technology and digital media. Nissenbaum's research publications have appeared in journals of philosophy, politics, law, media studies, information studies, and computer science. She has written and edited four books, including Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life, which was published in 2010 by Stanford University Press. The National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ford Foundation, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator have supported her work on privacy, trust online, and security, as well as several studies of values embodied in computer system design, including search enginesdigital gamesfacial recognition technology, and health information systems

What Privacy Protects Online
Speaker Helen Nissenbaum
Event/Type Colloquium
Date November 21, 2012 - November 21, 2012
Time 12 – 1:30pm
Location Room 300
Description

Exposing rampant monitoring of online activity, mainstream media have stirred widespread concern over privacy. Yet, vested interests favor the status quo and weak policy models fail to address critical privacy risks posed by online social media, behavioral marketing, and “big data.” Looking at the case of massive, open, online courses (MOOCS), Nissenbaum presents contextual integrity as a foundation for protecting privacy online by means of substantive norms that define what information can be collected and shared, from whom, about whom, with whom, and under what constraints. Rejecting a vision of the Net as undifferentiated commercial space she conceives it as radically heterogeneous space where appropriate flows of personal information sustain the integrity of fundamental social institutions, such as healthcare, marketplace, and education.

 


Helen Nissenbaum is Professor of Media, Culture and Communication, and Computer Science, at New York University, where she is also Senior Faculty Fellow of the Information Law Institute. Nissenbaum holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Stanford University and a B.A. (Hons) from the University of the Witwatersrand. Her areas of expertise span social, ethical, and political implications of information technology and digital media. Nissenbaum's research publications have appeared in journals of philosophy, politics, law, media studies, information studies, and computer science. She has written and edited four books, including Privacy in Context: Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life, which was published in 2010 by Stanford University Press. The National Science Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ford Foundation, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator have supported her work on privacy, trust online, and security, as well as several studies of values embodied in computer system design, including search enginesdigital gamesfacial recognition technology, and health information systems

Mobile Phones and Economic Development in Africa: Evidence from Policy and Field Experiments
Speaker Jenny Aker
Event/Type Seminar
Date November 29, 2012 - November 29, 2012
Time 4:30-6:00 PM
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

Mobile phone coverage and adoption has grown substantially over the past decade, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In the absence of public goods infrastructure in many countries, mobile phone technology has the potential to reduce communication and transaction costs and improve access to information, goods and services, particularly for remote rural populations. Research suggests that mobile phone coverage has had positive impacts on agricultural and labor market efficiency in certain countries, but empirical microeconomic evidence is still limited. This paper presents the results of several mobile phone policy and field experiments in sub-Saharan Africa, where mobile phones have been used for learning, money transfers and civic education programs. These experiments suggest that mobile phone technology can result in reductions in communication and transaction costs, as well as welfare gains. Nevertheless, mobile phone technology cannot serve as the “silver bullet” for development, and careful evaluations of mobile phone development projects are required. In addition, mobile phone technology must work in partnership with other public good provision and investment to achieve optimal development outcomes. 

Jenny C. Aker is an Assistant Professor of Economics at The Fletcher School and Department of Economics at Tufts University. She is also a Non-Resident Fellow at the Center for Global Development and a member of the Advisory Board for Frontline SMS.

After working for Catholic Relief Services as Deputy Regional Director in West and Central Africa between 1998 and 2003, Jenny returned to complete her PhD in agricultural economics at the University of California-Berkeley. Jenny works on economic development in Africa, with a primary focus on the impact of information and information technology on development outcomes, particularly in the areas of agriculture, agricultural marketing and education; the relationship between shocks and agricultural food market performance; the determinants of agricultural technology adoption; and impact evaluations of NGO and World Bank projects. Jenny has conducted field work in many countries in West and Central Africa, including Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, DRC, The Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Sudan, as well as Haiti and Guatemala.

For additional reading material, please click here

The Ongoing Quest for Judicial Independence in Contemporary China
Speaker He Weifang via CSCC
Event/Type Seminar
Date November 30, 2012 - November 30, 2012
Time 3:30-5:00pm
Location Tanenbaum Hall T-112
Description

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Contemporary China

Penn’s Center for the Study of Contemporary China is pleased to have the opportunity to host a talk by Professor He Weifang, one of China’s most prominent public intellectuals and a frequent commentator in various media outlets, including social media.

He Weifang (贺卫方)is Professor of Law at Peking University’s School of Law and one of China’s leading academic advocates of legal reform.  In 2001, China Youth magazine named him one of the top 100 young people who might shape China the 21st Century.  In 2011, Foreign Policy named him to its list of Top 100 Global Thinkers .

Professor He is a prolific scholar and popular teacher on the subjects of jurisprudence, constitutional law, legal history, and comparative law.  He graduated from Chongqing’s Southwest Institute of Politics and Law in 1982-- a member of the first law school class following the Cultural Revolution-- and then received his LL.M from the China University of Politics and Law.  His teaching career began at the China University of Politics.  In 1995, he was hired by Peking University’s Law School where he became full professor and Ph.D. supervisor.  From 2009 to 2011, Professor He taught at Shihezi University in Xinjiang.  

Professor He helped establish Comparative Law (比较法研 究), China’s first scholarly journal on comparative law, and served as editor-in-chief of the Peking University Law Journal.  He has been a visiting scholar at the Program in East Asian Legal Studies at Harvard Law School and has lectured widely in the United States, Europe, and Japan.  Brookings Institution Press has just published In the Name of Justice: Striving for the Rule of Law in China, a new book containing English translations of He Weifang’s recent writings.

Event cosponsored by Penn's Law School, Center for East Asian Studies, the East Asia Law Review, and the Foreign Policy Research Institute.

December 2012
Stakeholder Mapping & Policy Analysis: Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia
Speaker Lauren Kogen
Event/Type Call for Proposals
Date December 10, 2012 - December 30, 2012
Description

Stakeholder Mapping & Policy Analysis: Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia

 

The Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS) at the University of Pennsylvania, together with the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford, announces a call for proposals for a stakeholder mapping and policy analysis project regarding ICTs and media in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia.

Applicants should apply to conduct a stakeholder mapping and policy analysis in one of these three countries, and will be expected to be from (for individuals) or based in (for organizations) the target country.

The purpose of the project is to understand the relationship between ICT policy and the use of ICTs in processes of governance and state-building. This project, funded by the Carnegie Corporation, is part of a larger project on the role of ICTs in statebuilding and peacebuilding. The aim of this portion of the project is to understand 1) what ICT policies are; 2) who the players are that influence ICT policy and ICT policy debate; and 3) who are the stakeholders that are using ICTs in ways that affect governance and state-building.

For the policy analysis portion of the project, the applicant should look at policy regulating ICTs, both formal and less formal, including ICT laws and regulations, codes of conduct, customary law (both local and international) and examples of contracts for media entities outside the country that are involved with media in the country, etc.

For the, closely connected, stakeholder mapping portion of the project, the applicant should seek to answer two questions:

1)      “Who are the players influencing ICT policy and ICT policy debate?” These could be politicians, national businesses, multinational corporations, phone companies, international NGOs, civil society groups, religious groups, professional journalist organizations, international governments (such as China and other emerging donors) and inter-governmental organizations  (such as the U.N.) etc. We are trying to get a comprehensive picture of who influences the ICT policy space.

2)      “Who are the primary stakeholders using ICTs in processes of governance and state building?” Again, this may be the national government, the local government, traditional authorities, religious leaders, NGOs, civil society groups, as well as media entities as described above.

This research is not an evaluation of how effective different actors are at providing services, nor does the report have to offer policy recommendations.

Depending on the quality of the work, there is the possibility of extending this to a larger and more thorough analysis beginning in April or May of 2013.

Eligibility:

-          Individuals or institutions from Africa (preferably from Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia or Somaliland).

-          Need to be able to navigate in-country information sources.

The proposal should include:

-          Whether you are requesting to do the Ethiopia review, the Kenya review, or the Somalia review.

-          Method for collecting data

-          Proposed budget (approximately $8,000 - $12,000 USD).

-          Timeline (report must be completed by April 30, 2013).

-          Deliverables

-          The name of someone who can be reached between January 3 and January 12 for follow up questions prior to the final announcement of the award recipient in mid-January.

-          Whether the applicant will be available and willing to continue the next phase of the project (beginning in April or May of 2013), pending approval.

 

Please send proposals to Lauren Kogen (LKogen@asc.upenn.edu) by 5pm EST on December 30, 2012.

 

Literature Review: Call for Proposals
Speaker Lauren Kogen
Event/Type Call for Proposals
Date December 10, 2012 - December 30, 2012
Description

Literature Review: Call for Proposals

The Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS) at the University of Pennsylvania, together with the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford, announces a call for proposals for a literature review on the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in Africa to promote peacebuilding, statebuilding, and good governance, with a particular focus on Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia.

We are seeking to conduct a literature review that combines research coming from both inside and outside of Africa. We will be conducting the bulk of the research on sources emanating from outside Africa ourselves, but we are looking for a partner who can navigate African-based information sources.

This project, funded by the Carnegie Corporation, is part of a larger project on the role of ICTs in statebuilding and peacebuilding. The aim of this portion of the project is to understand: “What is the evidence on the role of ICTs in peacebuilding, statebuilding, and good governance in Africa?” This considerably broad research question should focus on empirical research and take into account the relevant literature on:

-          ICTs and political participation

-          ICTs and social accountability

-          ICTs and governance

-          ICTs and service delivery

-          ICTs and coalition building / social movements

-          ICTs and conflict prevention

-          ICTs and peacebuilding

-          Among other relevant topics

This literature review should include:

-          A review of the relevant peer-reviewed journal articles

-          A review of the relevant non-peer-reviewed journal articles

-          A review of the relevant gray literature (reports from civil society, NGOs, etc.)

-          Unpublished doctoral theses (and high quality masters theses) from students at African universities (focused on, but not limited to, universities in the target country/ countries)

-          Annotated bibliography of all journal articles and selected theses.

The author of the literature review will be expected to collate and annotate the sources, in such a way that they could be made available on an online repository of the relevant literature covering ICTs peacebuilding, statebuilding, and good governance in the selected countries and Africa more broadly. This repository has the goal of making scholarship that is usually locked behind pay walls or has not been organized systematically accessible to scholars, policy makers, and civil society organizations in Africa or focusing on Africa.

This will require the individual or organization to serve as our liaison with the authors of the articles and reports. We will need to establish what can be published on the online repository, in what format, and what permissions are needed from the authors and / or publishers.

The author will also be asked to co-produce, together with us, a thoughtful and critical synthesis of the literature in order to help answer the research question above.

Eligibility:

-          Individuals or institutions from Africa (preferably from Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia or Somaliland).

-          Need to be able to navigate in-country sources such as websites, get in contact with relevant academic institutions and scholars based in those countries to retrieve all relevant sources.

The proposal should include:

-          Whether you are requesting to do the Ethiopia review, the Kenya review, the Somalia review, two of these countries, or all three countries. (Preference will be given to individuals / organizations that can conduct the research for more than one country.)

-          An initial list of places you will look for research (databases, websites, universities, etc.) and your capacity to access these sources

-          Proposed budget (approximately $6,000-$9,000 USD)

-          Timeline

-          Deliverables

-          The name of someone who can be reached between January 3 and January 12 for follow up questions prior to the final announcement of the award recipient in mid-January.

 

 

Please send proposals to Lauren Kogen (LKogen@asc.upenn.edu) by 5pm EST on December 30, 2012.

 

Conceptual Aspects of Digital Innovation for International Development
Speaker Martin Hilbert
Event/Type Seminar
Date December 13, 2012 - December 13, 2012
Time 12 noon
Location Room 300
Description

The notion of the topic has its theoretical roots in Schumpeterian innovation theory of social modernization through “creative destruction”. Based on these ideas, we will work through a three-dimensional conceptual framework that models the ongoing digital transformations as interplay between technologies, social change, and policy strategies. The diffusion of the underlying enabling technologies through social networks is not instantaneous and therefore inevitably creates a divide between those that are already included and those still marginalized. The arising “digital divide” can be conceptualized as the response to the questions of who, with which kinds of attributes, connects how to what. Different constellations in these four variables lead to a combinatorial array of choices to define the digital divide. Given this wide array of possible definitions, we show that the digital divide is best defined in terms of a desired impact. Since those are diverse, so are the definitions of the challenge. We will also review several traditional and more recent areas of social change through digital means, such as e-government, e-business, e-edutainment and the use of ICT for public diplomacy and counterterrorism actives. Last but not least, we have to remember that ICT do not automatically lead to “development” and that the application of the very same tools can also lead to counterproductive results. Like all technologies, ICT are normatively neutral (rejecting technological determinism). Making ICT work for development requires the social construction of their usage through carefully designed policy strategies. We will review the case of the eLAC Action Plan, the intergovernmental policy strategy of Latin America and the Caribbean that is already in its third successful generation (eLAC2007, eLAC2010, and eLAC2015). Digital policy strategies for development face a set of challenges unique to digital progress (e.g. its speed and high levels of uncertainty) and to developing countries (e.g. the exogenous nature of technological progress). We review some of the most common tools to confront such challenges. These structural choices of development strategies aim at designing digital development policies with tangible positive impacts.

Bio

 

Before joining the University of Southern California (USC), Martin Hilbert coordinated the Information Society Program of United Nations’ Regional Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean for ten years, a program he created as a research a technological cooperation program of ICT-for-development (http://www.cepal.org/SocInfo). The program includes a team of 15 in-house professionals and over 250 research consultants. He personally provided hands-on technical assistance to Heads of States, government officials, legislators, diplomats, NGOs and civil society in over 20 countries. Policy makers from the highest political levels have officially recognized the impact of the resulting projects in public declarations. For example, the program spearheaded the creation and successful execution of the Latin American and Caribbean Action Plan for ICT4D (eLAC), and helped to design measurement indicators that have been officially adopted by the United Nations statistical system for permanent collection worldwide. He designed and teaches a Masters-level course on ICT4D at USC and published his findings in peer-reviewed Journal articles in the fields of communication, development, public policy, political science, forecasting and social change, and in four books about different aspects of ICT for development. His work has been featured in Scientific American, The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, NPR, BBC, Sueddeutsche, Die Welt, Correio Braziliense, La Repubblica, El Mercurio, El Pais, among others.

January 2013
The New Cold War: Information Policy and Political Rift
Speaker Philip N. Howard
Event/Type Seminar
Date January 10, 2013 - January 10, 2013
Time 12 noon to 1:30 p.m.
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

There is a new Cold War starting. It does not involve opposing military forces, but it does involve competing ideas about how political life should be organized. The battles are between broadcast media outlets and social media upstarts, organizations that have very different approaches to news production, ownership, and censorship. In several countries, this war pits the ruling elites who dominate broadcast media against the civil society groups who flourish through social media. These are not simply information wars between political elites and persecuted democracy activists. There is a deep structural rift between the organization and values of broadcast media and those of social media, and this rift has become a defining feature of political culture in many authoritarian regimes. Digital activism is on the rise globally, and the impact of activist projects grows more impressive year by year. Political tension between the institutions of broadcast media and the new organizational upstarts of social media is significant, yet plays out in similar ways in Russia, Venezuela, and China. Political elites tend to defend the media organizations that already exist, but almost all of the exciting and innovative civic innovation happens online.

 

BIO

Philip N. Howard (BA Toronto, MSc London School of Economics, PhD Northwestern) is a professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. He directs the Digital Activism Research Project, the World Information Access Project (wiaproject.org) and the Project on Information Technology and Political Islam (pitpi.org). These research projects—supported by both the National Science Foundation and Intel’s People and Practices Group—investigate patterns of technology diffusion between and within developing countries and the role of new information technologies in political communication systems around the world. His most recent books include Democracy’s Fourth Wave? Digital Media and the Arab Spring (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2012), Castells and the Media (London, UK: Polity, 2011) and The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2010). He is the author of New Media Campaigns and the Managed Citizen (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006), about how digital information technologies are used to manipulate public opinion in the United States. His books have won praise from across the social sciences, with awards from the American Political Science Association, the American Sociological Association, and the International Communication Association. He has edited Society Online: The Internet in Context (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 2004, with Steve Jones) and the Handbook of Internet Politics (London: Routledge, 2008, with Andrew Chadwick). He has authored numerous journal articles examining the role of new information and communication technologies in politics and social development, including pieces in the American Behavioral Scientist, the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and New Media & Society. He has worked on several NSF projects, serving on the advisory board of the Survey2000 and Survey2001 Projects, and co-managing a project about Information and Communication Technologies in Central Asia. He teaches courses on research methodspolitics online, and international development. Howard has been a Fellow at the Pew Internet & American Life Project in Washington D.C., the LSE’s Stanhope Centre for Communications Policy Research, Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and is currently a fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy.  His website is philhoward.org and he tweets from @pnhoward.

The 'Panoptification' of India: the Battle for Digital Free Will
Speaker Malavika Jayaram
Event/Type Seminar
Date January 17, 2013 - January 7, 2013
Time 12:00-1:00pm
Location Room 300 Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania
Description

Details on this noontime seminar to be determined.

The 'Panoptification' of India: the Battle for Digital Free Will
Speaker Malavika Jayaram
Event/Type Seminar
Date January 17, 2013 - January 17, 2013
Time 12 noon to 1:30 p.m.
Location Room 300, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

The Center For Global Communication Studies in collaboration with CASI (the Center for the Advanced Study of India) presnt a noontime seminar with Malavika Jayaram:

As Internet penetration has increased in India, the capacity for citizens to exercise freedom of speech has grown massively. At the same time, there has been growing pressure from government and legislators to introduce greater surveillance of those exercising these new freedoms. This talk will look at the relationship between these two phenomena - examining the intersection between threats to speech and privacy – and at the challenges to the notion of digital free will. 

One battleground is the Internet, which authorities frequently perceive as a threat (despite the otherwise strong commitment to democracy and constitutionally protected free speech). The other is a growing set of e-governance schemes that use biometric data or otherwise link previously separate databases, creating a massive intelligence network. In the absence of strong data protection and privacy laws, the desire to make citizens visible to the state (often with good intentions, in the name of welfare) poses several challenges.

India has seen a growing number of high profile cases recently where citizens have been arrested for comments made on Facebook. The Indian authorities have very publicly demanded data and surveillance capabilities from technology providers, many of which are based outside India (the 4-year stand-off that Research in Motion had with the Indian authorities culminated in RIM handing over encryption keys and infrastructure). There have been well-documented instances of demands by the Indian authorities for the censorship of Internet content over several years and these appear to be increasing in frequency and breadth.  They are also now impacting on major platform providers who are being taken to court for failure to take down “inflammatory images”. A particularly tense battleground is the newly enacted rules under key legislation, which requires objectionable content (defined very broadly) to be taken down within 36 hours.

Foucault asserts that the “major effect of [Jeremy Bentham's] Panopticon” is “to induce in the inmate a state of conscious and permanent visibility that assures the automatic functioning of power”. Using the lens of e-governance schemes such as the biometric ID project, and recent violations of online free speech (including citizen arrests, platform surveillance and censorship), the talk will examine the challenges to being private and free in India, and consider whether Bentham's panoptic structure might be fully realized.

---

A dual-qualified lawyer, Malavika spent eight years in London - with global law firm
Allen & Overy in the Communications, Media & Technology group, and then with
Citigroup. She relocated to India in 2006, and wears 3 hats as a practising lawyer, a
Fellow at the Centre for Internet and Society (CIS) and a PhD scholar. As a partner
at Jayaram & Jayaram, Bangalore, she focuses on corporate/tech transactions and
has a special interest in new media and the arts. At CIS, Malavika collaborates on
projects that study legislative and policy changes in the internet governance and
privacy domains. As a PhD scholar, she is looking at data protection and privacy
in India, with a special focus on e-governance schemes and the new biometric ID
project.

A graduate of the National Law School of India, she has an LL.M. from Northwestern
University, Chicago. She is on the advisory board of the Indian Journal of Law &
Technology and is the author of the India chapter for the Data Protection & Privacy
volume in the Getting the Deal Through series, launched this year. She is one of
10 Indian lawyers featured in “The International Who's Who of Internet e-
Commerce & Data Protection Lawyers 2012” directory.

She is currently running a research project for Internews, studying internet policy
in India. This will produce a landscape overview and interviews with various
stakeholders in this domain.

 

Ten trends in Technology Use in Education in Developing Countries that you may not have heard about (and why you should care)
Speaker Mike Trucano
Event/Type ICT4D Seminar
Date January 24, 2013 - January 24, 2013
Time 4:30-6:00 PM
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

Ten trends in Technology Use in Education in Developing Countries that you may not have heard about (and why you should care)

Much has long been made of the promise and potential of ICT use in education to help meet a variety of longstanding challenges to education systems in low and middle income countries. Most of the ICT-enabled 'solutions' to such 'challenges' have traditionally been conceived, and constructed, based on experiences in industrialized economies of North America, Europe and Asia. What are we learning about how new technologies are actually being used in education in so-called 'developing countries' that is not often reported on in the international media?  

Join Mike Trucano, the World Bank's Senior ICT & Education Specialist, for an idiosyncratic tour around the world looking at emerging sets of experiences that are a bit 'under the radar' but which may shed light on what is working (and what isn't) and what this may suggest about possibilities and opportunities in the future.

--

Mike Trucano is the World Bank's Senior ICT and Education Policy Specialist, serving as the World Bank's focal point on the topic within the education sector and leads the World Bank's related analytical work under its flagship Systems Approach for Better Education Results initiative as it relates to information and communication technologies (SABER-ICT). In addition, Mike provides advice and support to World Bank country-level education projects seeking to utilize ICTs in various ways in multiple countries around the world; current areas of activity include ICT/education policy development, the use of mobile phones in education, ICT and education indicators, 'new economy skills for Africa', development of national ICT/education agencies, child Internet safety, and low-cost 'ICT devices'. As part of his duties, he co-chairs the World Bank's internal cross-sectoral thematic group on ICT and education, which helps to maintain the organization's internal knowledgebase on related topics and sponsors numerous speakers and knowledge-sharing events each year.

February 2013
Shaping Palestinian Media: A Case Study in Western Funding, NGO Actions and Internal Pressures
Speaker Matt Sienkiewicz
Event/Type Seminar
Date February 7, 2013 - February 7, 2013
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 300
Description

This talk considers the role of Western powers in establishing and influencing media institutions in the Middle East. Drawing on the Palestinian territories as a primary case study, it considers the motivations that underpin Western funding of Palestinian media as well as the limitations that are imposed on
local expression by such financial arrangements. Addressing theories of globalization, hybridity and international diplomacy, the talk analyzes specific, locally produced television programs in order to identify the power relations that help shape them. Ultimately, the talk argues for the need to move beyond structural, economic analysis and engage in local production study in order to understand these complex, highly asymmetrical forms of international media coproduction.

From Tehran to Tahrir: Public Space Redefined
Event/Type Workshop
Date February 8, 2013 - February 8, 2013
Location Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania
Description

From Tehran to Tahrir: Public Space Redefined  

February 8, 2013

8:30-5:00

Click here for the program agenda

Public Space is often idealized as a site where discourse and demonstration are at least tolerated, if not celebrated.  Where the ideal is harshly absent, individuals and groups seek to find alternate ways to exercise their speech rights, gain information, and enrich their practices of building community. These spaces can be tangible, such as the takeover of a privately owned park, or virtual, such as social media used in protests from Tehran to Tahrir. Reconceptualizing “public space” in the 21st century, this symposium draws on recent global events in order to identify potential shifts in the meaning of the term across temporal and geographic boundaries.

The symposium will discuss how the use of public space for political or social purposes is contested or rendered illegitimate, and how alternatives arise. How does the magnified role of social and digital media affect methods of communication and assembly? How does public space emerge in different urban, cultural, or political conditions? What is the evolving relationship between urbanism, media, and public space?

International scholars will present on topics such as:

• Urban design and rethinking public space: Examples from the Arab Spring, Iran, and beyond
• New technology and urban culture: Sentient cities and new forms of public space
• Religion, public space, and the state
• Art and media as defining and enriching public space
• Politics and protests as modes of legitimizing or delegitimizing public space

This event is sponsored by the Iran Media Program at the Annenberg School for Communication and the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. The Iran Media Program is a collaborative network designed to enhance the understanding of Iran's media ecology. Our goal is to strengthen a global network of media scholars and practitioners working on Iran-related topics and to contribute to Iran's civil society and the wider policy-making community by providing a more nuanced understanding of the role of media and the flow of information in Iran.

Click here for the program agenda

 

Writing the Social History of Iranian Cinema
Speaker Hamid Naficy
Event/Type Seminar
Date February 20, 2013 - February 20, 2013
Time 12 noon to 1:30 p.m.
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

This talk focuses on the just released 4-volume book, A Social History of Iranian Cinema, a work that took nearly four decades to complete.  The volumes’ overarching argument is the significant and signifying role of film and cinema in overdetermining modernity in Iran.  As a work of social history and theory, they deal not only with the chronological political developments in society and in the film industry but also with the synchronic contexts, formations, dispositions, and maneuvers that overdetermined modernity in Iran and a dynamically evolving film industry and its unique products.  I locate the film industry and its mode of production, narratives, aesthetics, and generic forms in the interplay of deeply rooted Iranian performative and visual arts and what was imported, adopted, adapted, translated, mistranslated, and hybridized from the West.  The interplay between Iranian and Islamic philosophies and aesthetics complicated and channeled cinema, particularly that involving women, in certain specific ways unique to Iran.  Likewise, the contribution of Iranian ethnoreligious minorities, both widespread and profound, gave Iranian cinema additional specificity.   

Hamid Naficy is Professor of Radio-Television-Film and the Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani Professor in Communication at Northwestern University, and he has an affiliate faculty appointment in the Department of Art History.  He is a leading authority in cultural studies of diaspora, exile, and postcolonial cinemas and media and of Iranian and Middle Eastern cinemas.  His areas of research and teaching include these topics as well as documentary and ethnographic cinemas.  Naficy has published extensively on these and allied theories and topics.  His English language books are: An Accented Cinema: Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking; Home, Exile, Homeland: Film, Media, and the Politics of Place (edited); The Making of Exile Cultures: Iranian Television in Los Angeles; Otherness and the Media: the Ethnography of the Imagined and the Imaged (co-edited); and Iran Media Index

His latest work is the four-volume book, A Social History of Iranian Cinema, which was published in 2011-12.  He has also published extensively in Persian, including a two-volume book on the documentary cinema theory and history, Film-e Mostanad. He has lectured widely internationally and his works have been cited and reprinted extensively and translated into many languages.

Evaluating US Foreign Assistance Programs:
Speaker Krishna Kumar, Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance Resources at the State Department
Event/Type Seminar
Date February 21, 2013 - February 21, 2013
Time 12:00- 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg School for Communication (3620 Walnut Street), Room 500
Description

M&E in International Development Seminar Series

Evaluating US Foreign Assistance Programs:

Perspectives from the State Department

With Krishna Kumar

February 21, 2013

12 noon to 1:30pm

Annenberg School for Communication

3620 Walnut St., Room 500

RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu

Lunch will be served at 11:45 – First come, first served

 

Since the US Agency for International Development established its first evaluation office in 1968, evaluation has been institutionalized in foreign assistance programs. USAID, Millennium Challenge Corporation and now the Department of State have been conducting evaluations of their policies, programs and projects. The focus of evaluations has been largely on examining the performance and, to a limited extent, the impacts of foreign assistance interventions.

A major development in the history of foreign assistance evaluation was the establishment of the Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance, now renamed as the Office of the Director of Foreign Resources (F Bureau) in the State Department in 2006. F was created to enable the Department to report to the Congress, Office of Budget and Management and the public on the performance and impacts of foreign assistance programs.  F developed has an extensive set of standard performance indicators “to measure both what is being accomplished with U.S. Government foreign assistance funds and the collective impact of foreign and host-government efforts to advance country development.” It submits annual reports to OMB and the Congress.

 

Although enormous progress has been made in the evaluation of foreign assistance programs, major challenges remain. These arise from (a) mixed objectives of the purposes of foreign assistance, (b) funding and management constraints (c) multi-donor nature of many projects in which different partners assume different roles and responsibilities, (d) limited participation of the host country partners in the conduct of evaluations, and (e) methodological issues in evaluating programs in emerging fields of assistance for the promotion of democracy and human rights and now diplomacy.  We are grappling with these issues.

Afternoon indicators workshop: Dr. Kumar will also host a workshop in the afternoon on indicators.

Dr. Krishna Kumar is a senior evaluation advisor in the Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance Resources at the State Department. Prior to joining the State Department, he served in a similar position in the Center for Development Information and Evaluation of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Earlier he worked at the World Bank and the East West Center. He received MA in Economics in India and Ph.D. at the Michigan State University.

Dr. Kumar has studied and examined development programs in 35 countries, and has directed a series of multi-country studies and evaluations on agriculture, rural development, family planning, elections, democracy promotion, the media, gender and democratic transition processes. He has given invitational lectures in numerous US and foreign universities He has authored over 35 monographs on evaluations and evaluation research and has published in scholarly journals.

He has written or edited thirteen books. His most recent books include “Promoting Independent Media; Strategies for Democracy Assistance” (2004), “Promoting Democracy in Postconflict Societies” (edited with Jerome de Zeeuw, 2006), and “Evaluating Democracy Assistance” (2013). All his past six books have been published by Lynne Rienner Publishers.

 


Workshop on Monitoring and Evaluation Indicators for International Development Projects
Speaker Krishna Kumar
Event/Type M&E in International Development Seminar Series
Date February 21, 2013 - February 21, 2013
Time 2:00-3:00pm
Location Annenberg Public Policy Center 202 South 36th St., 1st Floor Conference Room
Open to RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

M&E in International Development Seminar Series

Workshop on Monitoring and Evaluation Indicators for

International Development Projects

With Krishna Kumar

February 21, 2013

2pm to 3pm

Annenberg Public Policy Center

202 South 36th St., 1st Floor Conference Room

RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu

 

Dr. Krishna Kumar, a senior evaluation advisor in the Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance Resources at the State Department, will offer an informal workshop after his lunchtime talk to discuss the nature and meaning of indicators and their role in evaluation.  It will trace the history of the use of indicators in foreign assistance programs and examine different kinds of indicators – micro, meso and macro level indicators that are being used for monitoring and evaluation purposes.  Examples will be drawn from democracy assistance. The use and misuse of indicators will also be discussed.

Dr. Krishna Kumar is a senior evaluation advisor in the Office of the Director of Foreign Assistance Resources at the State Department. Prior to joining the State Department, he served in a similar position in the Center for Development Information and Evaluation of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Earlier he worked at the World Bank and the East West Center. He received MA in Economics in India and Ph.D. at the Michigan State University.

Dr. Kumar has studied and examined development programs in 35 countries, and has directed a series of multi-country studies and evaluations on agriculture, rural development, family planning, elections, democracy promotion, the media, gender and democratic transition processes. He has given invitational lectures in numerous US and foreign universities He has authored over 35 monographs on evaluations and evaluation research and has published in scholarly journals.

He has written or edited thirteen books. His most recent books include “Promoting Independent Media; Strategies for Democracy Assistance” (2004), “Promoting Democracy in Postconflict Societies” (edited with Jerome de Zeeuw, 2006), and “Evaluating Democracy Assistance” (2013). All his past six books have been published by Lynne Rienner Publishers.


China's Influence and Impact on the Future of Everybody's Internet
Speaker Rebecca MacKinnon, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation
Date February 27, 2013 - February 27, 2013
Time 4:30- 6:00pm
Location ANNS 111, Annenberg Building
Ticketing RSVP to lsh@asc.upenn.edu
Description

In recent global debates over the future of Internet governance, China, Russia and a collection of authoritarian states have found themselves at odds with the U.S. and much of the democratic world. China wants the internet's future to be determined by nation-states alone, while the U.S. and a range of allies advocate a "multi-stakeholder" approach to Internet governance in which civil society, business, and technical experts have an equal say alongside governments in negotiating the rules and technical standards that will shape the future of everybody's Internet. As Chinese Internet and telecommunications companies expand around the world, Chinese government internet controls originally meant to block and monitor online activity inside the PRC have growing implications for Internet and mobile technologies all around the world. What does all of this mean for the future of the global Internet? This talk will provide an overview of the issues and the stakes, and ask what it will take to ensure that our globally interconnected Internet evolves in a manner that respects the rights and serves the interests of all Internet users, whether they live in the East or the West.

Rebecca MacKinnon is a Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation where she conducts research, writing, and advocacy projects focused on the intersection of networked technologies, human rights, and corporate accountability. She is author of Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle For Internet Freedom (Basic Books, 2012). In 2013 she is working with CGCS on the interdisciplinary project, New Technologies, Human Rights and Transparency.

From September 2010-August 2012 MacKinnon was a Bernard Schwartz Senior Fellow also at the New America Foundation. Concurrently in the Spring of 2012 was Hearst Professional-in-residence at Columbia Journalism School and listed by the Columbia Journalism Review as one of “40 women who changed the media business in the past 40 years” primarily due to her role as co-founder of Global Voices Online (globalvoicesonline.org), a path-breaking global online citizen media network.  She also serves on the Boards of Directors of the Committee to Protect Journalists and the Global Network Initiative, a multi-stakeholder organization that advances corporate responsibility and human rights in the technology sector.

Fluent in Mandarin Chinese, MacKinnon worked as a journalist for CNN in Beijing for nine years and was Beijing Bureau Chief and Correspondent from 1998-2001, then served as CNN’s Tokyo Bureau Chief and Correspondent from 2001-03.  From 2004-06 she was a fellow at Harvard, first at the Shorenstein Center on the Press and Publicy Policy and then at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. In 2007-08 she taught online journalism at the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre. In 2009 she conducted research and writing as an Open Society Fellow, and in the Spring of 2010 she was a Visiting Fellow at Princeton’s Center or Information Technology Policy. MacKinnon received her AB magna cum laude from Harvard University and was a Fullbright scholar in Taiwan in 1991-92. She currently lives in Washington DC.

Mali: Islamic Militarism and Foreign Intervention
Speaker Roundtable with Dr. Susanna Wing, Haverford College; Dr. Bruce Whitehead, Lehigh University; Mr. Jermey Dell, University of Pennsylvania; Mr. Mohamed Keita, Committee to Protect Journalists
Date February 27, 2013 - February 27, 2013
Time 2:00- 5:00 PM
Location Steitler Hall, Silverstein Forum, 208 South 37th Street
Open to Free and Open to the Public
Description

University of Pennsylvania
Africa Center

Presents a Round-table on:

"Mali: Islamic Militarism and Foreign Intervention"

February 27th, 2013
2:00 - 5:00 PM

Steitler Hall, Silverstein Forum, 208 South 37th Street

Co-Sponsors: Center for Global Communication Studies at Annenberg School for Communication


Free & Open to the Public


Among the presenters:

Dr. Susanna Wing, Haverford College
Dr. Bruce Whitehead, Lehigh University
Mr. Jermey Dell, University of Pennsylvania
Mr. Mohamed Keita, Committee to Protect Journalists

Simulations for Equity in Education (SEE)
Speaker Jordan Naidoo, Senior Education Advisor for UNICEF
Event/Type PennGSE: Seminar
Date February 28, 2013 - February 28, 2013
Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

In 2010, the UNICEF report 'Narrowing the Gaps to Meet the Goals' found that pro-­‐‑equity interventions are a faster and more cost-­‐‑effective way than 'business as usual' to achieve the health Millennium Development Goals. Besides its other impact, the report prompted the question: Is the same true for education? The Simulations for the World Bank to identify cost-­‐‑effective strategies for reaching children who are excluded from or underserved by
education systems. Equity is a keystone of both organizations' approaches to education. SEE is intended to help countries develop cost-­‐‑effective, pro-­‐‑equity education strategies, and to serve as a global tool for developing evidence-­‐‑based documentation of and advocacy for such strategies. Cornerstones of this effort are the Simulations for Equity in Education model and a database on the effectiveness of education interventions around the world.

The PennGSE International Educational Development Program (IEDP) is a Masters program that prepares students for work with non-profits, inter-governmental agencies, and the private sector – working toward improving education around the world. For more information visit http://www.gse.upenn.edu/IEDP

 

March 2013
India’s Civil Liberties Crisis: Of Bans, Blocks, Bullying and Biometrics
Speaker Malavika Jayaram
Date March 28, 2013 - March 28, 2013
Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location Room 500, Annenberg School of Communication, 3620 Walnut St.
Description

Unlike the US First Amendment, the first amendment to the Constitution of India actually strengthened state regulation over freedom of speech. Irony aside, the amendment that is considered by many scholars as the first media crisis in post-colonial India has increasing relevance today. Its prioritization of sovereignty and national security over democratic rights and institutions has resulted in a zone of contestation between nation building and free speech. This is playing out through a series of battles involving website blocking, book banning, biometric databases and bullying of all kinds.

 

In the last few months, an all-girl rock band in Kashmir was silenced, a village in Bihar banned women and girls from using mobile phones, and we had yet another Salman Rushdie controversy. Movies were blocked. Facebook and Google were taken to court for hosting objectionable content. Paintings were removed from an art gallery at the “suggestion” of the police because they depicted Hindu deities as semi-nude. At the same time, there was a drive to digitize governance and to build biometric databases to enumerate and record every individual. The impacts on free speech, anonymity, and privacy were considered fair game in the drive towards progress, inclusion, and maintenance of public order.

 

The relationship between the citizen and the state is undergoing a radical transformation mediated by the marriage of welfare schemes and commercial interests. The privacy of one’s body and identity is challenged by initiatives to capture fingerprints, irises, faces, and transactions. The heckler’s vote is increasingly powerful in silencing free expression. Civil society is under siege for resisting the onslaught of draconian legislation, arbitrary restrictions, and the banning of various forms of cultural output. Narratives are being constructed that attribute all civic engagement with “western values” and with being mouthpieces of foreign interests.

 

In this talk, I will give an overview of the strands of discord that are forming the fabric of India’s latest crisis of democracy. I will unpack some of the rhetoric behind the government’s drive to grasp the individual, and make the citizen visible to the state in an unprecedented manner. I will also discuss my experiences working with civil society in India, and the tools and techniques used to engage with policy formation and to adapt to the future of advocacy.

 

A dual-qualified lawyer, Malavika Jayaram spent eight years in London - with global law firm Allen & Overy in the Communications, Media & Technology group, and then with Citigroup. She relocated to India in 2006, and wears 3 hats as a practising lawyer, a Fellow at the Centre for Internet and Society (CIS) and a PhD scholar. As a partner at Jayaram & Jayaram, Bangalore, she focuses on corporate/tech transactions and has a special interest in new media and the arts. At CIS, Malavika collaborates on projects that study legislative and policy changes in the internet governance and privacy domains. As a PhD scholar, she is looking at data protection and privacy in India, with a special focus on e-governance schemes and the new biometric ID project.

A graduate of the National Law School of India, she has an LL.M. from Northwestern University, Chicago. She is on the advisory board of the Indian Journal of Law & Technology and is the author of the India chapter for the Data Protection & Privacy volume in the Getting the Deal Through series, launched this year. She is one of 10 Indian lawyers featured in “The International Who's Who of Internet e- Commerce & Data Protection Lawyers 2012” directory.

She is currently running a research project for Internews, studying internet policy in India. This will produce a landscape overview and interviews with various stakeholders in this domain.

April 2013
Public Opinion Barometer: How to Aggregate and Analyze Fragmented Online Information
Speaker Dr. Guoming Yu
Date April 1, 2013 - April 1, 2013
Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location Room 500, Annenberg School of Communication, 3620 Walnut St.
Description

Public opinion barometer:

How to aggregate and analyze fragmented online information

Dr. Guoming Yu

School of Journalism and Communication, Renmin University of China

April, 1st, 2013

 

Baidu (www.baidu.com), as the top Chinese web services company, covers more than 95% of internet users in China. There are more than 4 billion search requests via Baidu every day. The huge quantity of keyword searches on Baidu reflects the genuine needs of Chinese internet users and the characteristics of their information-seeking behaviors. It may also depict the reality of the society, the economy, the culture and people’s daily lives in China. In a sense, the search terms on Baidu have become a good reference for the changing trends of social development and public opinion in China.

However, lacking systematic analysis, these search terms may only sporadically reflect the development of Chinese society and thus cannot help scholars see the whole picture and make future predictions. Their potential needs to be further and better explored. Therefore, by utilizing online data mining methods and with cooperation from Baidu Inc., the Public Opinion Research Center at Renmin University of China examined and analyzed search terms on Baidu. We proposed several new indexes, such as the China Social Care Index, China Public Opinion Pressure Index, China Economy Attention Index, People’s Well-being Attention Index, China Social Responsibility Attention Index, China Innovation Attention Index, China Social Expectation Attention Index, China Ecological Environment Safety Attention Index, China Financial Safety Attention Index, China Information Security Attention Index, China Population Security Attention Index, China Resources Security attention index, China Public Health Attention Index, and the China Public Security Attention Index. These new indexes delineated the needs and focus of internet users in China.

Dr. Yu and his team studied the top 1000 search terms on Baidu from 2009~2012. His report, Public opinion barometer: How to aggregate and analyze fragmented online information, will summarize the main findings and discuss his experiences in dealing with fragmented information online.

 

Dr. Guoming Yu is a Professor of Journalism and Communication at Renmin University of China. He also serves as the Associate Dean of School of Journalism and Communication and the Director of Public Opinion Research Center. Dr. Yu is also the President of the Chinese Media Economics Association, Vice President of the Chinese Communication Association, Vice President of the Higher Education Committee at China Television Artists Association, and Executive Director of the China Youth & Children Research Center. He also provides advice and support to General Administration of Press and Publication and the Taiwan Affairs Office of the State Council.

 

Dr. Yu’s research interests include Journalism and Communication Theories, Public Opinion Theories and Methods, and Media Economics and Social Development. He is a leading scholar of empirical research in Communication in China and has conducted over 400 projects since 1980s. Dr. Yu has published 21 books and over 400 papers, articles, and reports. He ranks No. 2 in terms of number of publications and No. 3 in terms of citations in the field of Journalism and Communication in China. He has also been honored as one of the “Top ten innovative characters for Chinese media,” “Great minds for Chinese media development,” and “Ten most influential figures on Chinese media development in the past 60 years.”

 

His selective publications include Look into media industry in China: Reform motivation and future directions (1993); Public opinion research in China (1993); The essence of media industry and competition strategy (2003); Public opinion: theories, methods and application (2005); Soft power of Chinese media (2009); Microblog: Examination of the new platform for communication—Influence model and its social application (2011); Bluebook of media industry development index in China (2012); Annual report on public opinion in China (2012). In recent years, he has devoted himself to the applications of digital text analysis to monitor and examine online public opinion, and the explorations of utilizing cognitive neuroscience methods in communication studies.

Dissemination and Implementation Research in Low and Middle Income Countries
Speaker Laura Murray
Date April 2, 2013 - April 2, 2013
Time 12:30 - 1:30 pm
Location School of Medicine's Smilow Center for Translational Research Room 12-146AB- 3400 Civic Center Blvd., next to the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine
Description

This presentation will give a brief overview of implementing evidence-based practices in global health and global mental health research. Specifically, it will address challenges and lessons learned around monitoring and evaluation (M&E) implementation in low and middle income countries (LMIC). Various implementation strategies that have been used in studies in LMIC will be outlined, such as the Apprenticeship Model of Training lay workers. Implementation evaluations from multiple studies will be reviewed including: a) client and counselor perspectives of implementing an evidence based mental health treatment for children in Zambia, and b) two randomized controlled trials of a Common Elements Treatment Approach for adult torture survivors in Southern Iraq and the Thailand-Burma border. Discussion will include future directions for implementation science and bi-directional learning with global and domestic D&I research.

 

Dr. Laura Murray, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and an Assistant Scientist at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Mental Health. Dr. Murray is part of the Applied Mental Health Research Group that uses a validated methodology (both qualitative and quantitative) on the Design, Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation of programs. This group strives to infuse evidence-based assessments, treatments and evaluations into existing programs by international aid organizations. Dr. Murray has a specialty in evidence-based interventions for children, adolescents and families, particularly in the area of trauma and traumatic grief. She has also developed a version of a Common Elements Treatment Approach for use in low-and middle- income countries (LMIC), specifically training lay persons. Dr. Murray’s specific area of interest is researching the implementation processes of mental health work in low-resource countries. Some of Dr. Murray’s funded projects include: a) examining the implementation and feasibility of a trauma-focused evidence-based treatment in Zambia (NIMH K23), b) a randomized clinical trial of TF-CBT and psychosocial counseling in Zambia (NICHD, RO1), c) researching the dissemination and implementation process of mental health treatments in low-resource countries (USAID), d) implementing a common elements intervention for adult survivors of torture in both Southern Iraq and the Thailand/Burma border – both of which include a RCT (USAID), and e) developing a manual for the inter-correlation of Mental Health and HIV in low-resource countries (USAID). She works closely with local organizations and populations to train on treatment models, appropriately adapt them for the culture and setting, and examine training and supervision models needed for implementation and sustainability in LMIC.

Internet Censorship, Surveillance, and Corporate Transparency
Speaker Dorothy Chou, Senior Policy Analyst for Google
Date April 3, 2013 - April 3, 2013
Time 4:30-6:30 PM followed by a reception
Location Room 109, Annenberg School of Communication, 3620 Walnut St.
Description

Internet Censorship, Surveillance, and Corporate
Transparency: Google’s Dorothy Chou in conversation with international experts

Since mid 2010 Google has been publishing data about the requests it receives from governments to remove content or hand over user data. These Transparency Reports reveal alarming trends: Government surveillance is on the rise, everywhere. Even worse, a large number of government censorship and surveillance requests are of dubious legality even according to the host countries’ own laws. In a world where citizens increasingly rely on digital products and services owned and operated by private corporations for their civic and political lives, the implications for human rights and democracy around the world are troubling.

Dorothy Chou, a Senior Policy Analyst who leads Google’s efforts to increase transparency, will discuss Google’s Transparency Report with Rebecca MacKinnon, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation and author of Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom. They will then be joined by a panel of international experts who will react to the report and discuss the question of whether accountable governance in any society is possible without sufficient transparency and accountability in how companies respond to government censorship and surveillance demands. They are:

Ronaldo Lemos, Director Center for Technology and Society at the Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV) School of Law in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Hu Yong, Associate Professor, Peking University School of Journalism and
Communication
Malavika Jayaram, Fellow, Center for Internet and Society, Bangalore and
Annenberg CGCS
Gregory Asmolov, PhD Candidate, London School of Economics; Global
Voices “RuNet Echo” contributor and Russian social media expert

This event is part of the cross-disciplinary, university-wide “New Technologies, Human Rights, and Transparency” project funded by the university’s Global Engagement Fund and hosted by Annenberg’s Center for Global Communications Studies in partnership with Wharton, PennLaw, Engineering, and the School of Arts and Sciences. The project aims to examine the relationship between government and corporate power in today’s digitally networked world, bringing together research partners from across the university and around the world to develop a methodology to evaluate and compare the policies and practices of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) companies as they affect Internet users' freedom expression and privacy in a human rights context. For more information see http://rankingdigitalrights.org

Dorothy Chou is a Senior Policy Analyst and leads Google's policy efforts to increase Transparency. She manages the day-to-day operations of the Policy Strategy team at Google's headquarters, and works on civil liberties and disaster relief projects as well as issues concerning Internet jurisdiction. Dorothy began working for Google in the Washington, D.C. office five years ago, managing issues around China, free expression and child safety before moving to the San Francisco Bay Area. Dorothy holds a B.S. in International Politics from Georgetown University's Walsh School of Foreign Service.

Research Workshop: New Technologies, Human Rights, and Transparency
Event/Type Workshop
Date April 4, 2013 - April 4, 2013
Time 10:00am-5:00pm
Location Room 500, Annenberg School of Communication, 3620 Walnut St.
Description

On April 4th the New Technologies, Human Rights, and Transparency project will hold a day-long invitation-only workshop to determine the scope and focus of general research and case study research to be conducted in 2013. The project brings together research partners from across the university and around the world to develop a methodology to evaluate and compare the policies and practices of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) companies as they affect Internet users' freedom expression and privacy in a human rights context. The workshop’s purpose is to ensure that research conducted in 2013 will answer the questions and collect and analyze the data needed to draft a Phase I methodology for ranking ICT companies on free expression and privacy.


Invited participants include: UPenn faculty advisors; graduate and undergraduate students involved in the research; international research partners from Brazil, China, India, Russia, the United Kingdom and elsewhere; human rights advocates; technologists; socially responsible investors; experts on best practices in corporate ranking and rating systems; experts in the field of business and human rights, business ethics, and corporate social responsibility.

The proceedings will be held under Chatham House Rule and a summary of the discussion and outcome will be published online.

 

For more information about participating please contact Rebecca MacKinnon at mackinnon@newamerica.net

For more information about the project please see http://rankingdigitalrights.org/.

Digital Heroes: Video Games and Identity Construction in Iranian Video Games
Speaker Vit Sisler, PhD.
Date April 8, 2013 - April 8, 2013
Time Noon - 1:30 PM
Location Annenberg Room 300
Description

This lecture analyzes contemporary Iranian video games and explores the ways in which they communicate different concepts of identity.
Video games are a form of mainstream media for Iranian youth, and have become a popular leisure time activity. These games provide them with various cultural symbols, myths, and rituals, which then become a constituent part of their identities.

At the same time, most games on the Iranian market are developed and produced in the United States and Europe. Unsurprisingly, the Iranian authorities are particularly concerned about the negative influence of such games on Iranian youth. Therefore, they established the National Institute of Computer Games in Tehran in 2006 in order to subsidize development of games in Iran, conceived in accordance with Iranian and Islamic values. Whereas the Iranian government perceives games as a new semiotic language of the youth and therefore utilizes them to promote Islamic values and foster national pride, many independent producers maneuver within and around state's interests, presenting instead their own, oftentimes quite different concepts of identity.

Therefore contemporary Iranian games encompass a broad variety of topics, ranging from the Islamic revolution through popular soap operas to ancient Persian mythology. The resulting concepts of identity are achieved through sensitive negotiations between the demands, funding and restrictions of the Islamic state and the visions and engagement of private entrepreneurs. Nevertheless, despite varying ideological background, independent and state-funded producers both share a common belief: that they are misrepresented by global video game production and strive to present unique Iranian heroes to their audiences.

 

Vit Sisler, PhD., is an assistant professor at the Faculty of Arts at Charles University in Prague. His research deals with the relation between Islam and digital media, normative frameworks in cyberspace, and the topic of educational and political video games. Vit Sisler was a visiting Fulbright scholar at Northwestern University in 2008-2009.
He is also a managing editor of CyberOrient, a peer reviewed journal published by the American Anthropological Association and Charles University in Prague. An excerpt from his upcoming chapter, Digital Heroes: Video Games and Identity Construction in Iranian Video Games, can be found here.

Rumor as Political Communication in Modern Iran
Speaker Dr. Pedram Partovi, Assistant Professor for the Department of History at American University
Date April 10, 2013 - April 10, 2013
Time 12:00- 1:30
Location Annenberg School for Communication 3620 Walnut St, Room 300
Description

In this talk, Dr. Pedram Partovi will consider the place of rumor in recent Iranian history. In general, scholars have associated the work of rumor with pre-modern societies - before the emergence of national ideologies or mass political organization (with the mass media contributing to these phenomena). However, rumor has held a vital role in political communication and mobilization in modern Iran. Some attribute the rumor's prominence in Iran to an "underdeveloped" political culture.

Dr. Partovi argues that this dependence on rumor can be linked to the prevalence of authoritarian political systems in Iran since before the Second World War - a situation that development experts and Western leaders had initially accepted and encouraged. Thus, the public has been largely dependent on rumors for stories of local and national concern considered unfit for print or broadcast. Frequently, these rumors are then reported in the press and on state broadcasts.  It is in part through this inversion of the news process that the general public has been drawn into national politics. 

 

This talk will examine the work of rumors and their media representations during four critical events of the past thirty years - the Islamic revolution of 1978-1979, the death and succession of Ayatollah Khomeini in 1989, the 1999 student revolts, and the 2009 post-election crisis.

His research interests focus on the ways in which pre-modern social practices and institutions are reworked through the mass media to make sense of the present in Iran and wider Persianate world.

The Goldilocks Problem: Not too Much Data, Not too Little Data, the Challenge of Getting it Just Right
Speaker Dean Karlan, Professor of Economics at Yale University, Founder and President of Innovations for Poverty Action
Date April 11, 2013 - April 11, 2013
Time 1:00-2:00pm
Location In room 500, Annenberg School for Communication
Description

‘Measurement’ and ‘impact’ are increasingly common buzzwords in global development. Across all sectors, NGOs are scrambling to design monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems that can demonstrate their programs’ impact on their target populations – but frequently without sufficient understanding of why or how this can be done. Oftentimes, data collection is ‘too big’ and yields information that cannot be accessed or used in any reasonable way. Data collection can also be ‘too small,’ leaving program managers with insufficient insight into how programs are performing. In the end, these efforts yield evaluations that provide un-reliable estimates of impact and monitoring systems that fail to support the day-to-day needs of program implementation.

The challenge facing NGOs is that while there is increasing pressure to ‘do M&E,’ there is no single answer to the question of how M&E should be done across the range of development sectors, approaches, organizations and contexts. The Goldilocks Problem proposes a framework for building ‘right-fit’ M&E systems, replacing the default impact imperative with two guiding principles: feasibility (‘Is it within the organization’s capacity to carry out this M&E activity fully and well?’) and actionability (‘Can the outputs of this M&E activity be used to inform decision making and action?’). This approach does not replace the need for rigorous impact evaluation, but rather complements it by helping NGOs create M&E systems that can provide them with the information they need to promote effective development.


About Dean Karlan:

Dean Karlan is a Professor of Economics at Yale University. Karlan is President of Innovations for Poverty Action, a non-profit organization that creates and evaluates solutions to social and development problems, and works to scale-up successful ideas through implementation and dissemination to policymakers, practitioners, investors and donors. Karlan is on the Board of Directors of the M.I.T. Jameel Poverty Action Lab. As a social entrepreneur, He is Founder and President of stickK.com, a website that uses lessons from behavioral economics to help people reach personal goals, such as weight loss and smoking cessation, through commitment contracts.

In 2011, Karlan co-authored More Than Good Intentions: How a New Economics is Helping to Solve Global Poverty. Karlan received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and was named an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow. His research focuses on microeconomic issues of financial decision-making, specifically employing experimental methodologies to examine what works, what does not, and why in interventions in microfinance, health, behavioral economics and charitable giving. In microfinance, he has studied credit impact, interest rate policy, savings product design, credit scoring policies, entrepreneurship training, and group versus individual liability. Karlan received a Ph.D. in Economics from M.I.T., an M.B.A. and an M.P.P. from the University of Chicago, and a B.A. in International Affairs from the University of Virginia. He can be followed on twitter @deankarlan, and blogs regularly on Freakonomics.

Visiting Scholars Lecture: Chinese Internet Privacy and Online Public Space with Jinghong Xu and Yunze Zhao
Speaker Jinghong Xu and Yunze Zhao
Date April 17, 2013 - April 17, 2013
Time 12:00-2:00pm
Location Annenberg Room 300
Description

Part 1: Internet Privacy in China: Historical and Cultural Background, Present Legal Framework and Future Improvement

Speaker: Jinghong Xu

A 12-article Decision on Strengthening Online Information Protection, which has the same legal effect as law, was adopted on December 28th 2012 by lawmakers at a session of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, which is China's top legislature. The main purpose of the Decision is to enhance the protection of personal information online and safeguard public interests. The Decision can be regarded as an important milestone in Chinese laws and regulations of protecting the Internet privacy.

The lecture, Internet Privacy in China: Historical and Cultural Background, Present Legal Framework and Future Improvement, traces the historical and cultural background of Internet privacy in China and the evolving legal frameworks for protecting the right to privacy and the right to Internet privacy. The lecture explores the status quo and existing problems of present legal frameworks in detail and offers related suggestions and future work.

Part 2: From Technology to Politics: the Characteristics of Public Space Online in China

Speaker: Yunze Zhao

As a result of developments in the Internet and information technology, Chinese civil society has been drastically transformed by the online public space that has emerged in the past few years. Chinese social media and traditional media are interacting in new ways to create a new online and offline public space for the diffusion of news and information. Largely, Chinese bloggers and online journalists are using new media to publish news stories that are later picked up by mainstream television networks and newspapers. In this way, the traditional media plays an irreplaceable role in the discovery of online news and the spread of information. One survey shows that 65.2% of public events were first exposed by new media in 2011, an increase of just over 50% from 2007. Of these events, 14.3% were exposed by blogs, 20.3% by Weibo, and 24.9% by independent news sites.  However, another survey in 2012 reported that people still viewed television as the most credible news source (63.1%), followed by newspapers (19.4%) and the Internet (12.3%). Many more people also have access to television (96.95%) and newspapers (90.9%) versus the Internet (39.9%). As a result, a lot of sensitive news stories and scandals are originally exposed on the Internet, but require news reports by traditional media to sanction and dispense this information. Additionally, news stories are often collected and republished on the Web, inspiring more discussion online and widening the public discourse. Additionally, while some scholars have equated “online public opinion” with “grassroots”, “bottom up” activism, the middle class seems to have the most discourse power on the Internet. One research study in 2010 found that the middle class controls 68% of discourse power on the Internet, while the upper class (20%), and lower classes (12%) engage in a minority of the online dialogue.

 

The attitude of the government towards online public opinion has been characterized as simultaneously progressive and conservative. On the one hand, the Chinese government has taken effective measures to promote the construction of a feedback system to allow for increased levels of public opinion. From the central government to different levels of local government, most government offices have created an online-opinion-feedback center to utilize the new technologies to their advantage. On the other hand, the government still considers the public space a place of rebellion and has been restrictive of certain types of public opinion due to the “unpredictable” nature of the Internet. The limitations of the public sphere in China are very obvious. China’s open online space still lacks a core power that could organize the needs of different groups to form an effective system outside of the government. In addition, the tendency for Chinese officials to avoid political issues has made the advancement of reform rather slow. As a result, it is extremely difficult to persuade the government officials to reform the public sphere. However, there is still a great deal of potential for further development of the public sphere in China. The purpose of this discussion is to recognize the role of the Internet in reconstructing the social communication sphere to move towards democratic transformations.

 

Jinghong Xu is a Professor of Communication at the School of Digital Media and Design Arts, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT). He is a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the Center for Global Communication Studies of Annenberg School for Communication, the University of Pennsylvania, vice director of the interdisciplinary Center of Social Network Information Management and Service, BUPT, and a post-doctoral candidate at the Institute of Law, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He is member of International Communication Association (ICA), World Association for Public Opinion Research (WAPOR), and a Reviewer of the Chinese Social Sciences Citation Index's (CSSCI) journal Library and Information Service. His research focuses on new media communication, media ethics, media policy and law, cyber culture, information law, Internet law, Internet Governance, online privacy, online public opinion, and digital copyright. He holds a BA in English, MA in Journalism and Ph.D. in Communication. He has been involved in many funded projects as principal investigator, co-investigator, and collaborator and has published a book and more 50 articles.

 

 

 

Yunze Zhao is an associate professor at the school of journalism and communication at Renmin University of China (RUC) in Beijing. He is also the Editorial Director of JOURNALISM EVOLUTION, and directs the community newspapers of NEWS WEEKLY in campus. His research focuses on media convergence, new media, cross culture communication and media history. He heads the research group “Factors of China’s Image Construction From Outside” which funded by Chinese Education Department and the group “Interpretive History of Chinese Journalism History” which funded by RUC. He has published several books and articles in communications and sociological journals. Dr. Zhao holds a Ph.D. in journalism from the Renmin University of China

 

May 2013
Evaluating Democracy Assistance Grantmaking
Speaker Rebekah Usatin
Date May 1, 2013 - May 1, 2013
Time 12:00- 1:00 pm
Location Annenberg School Room 500
Description
Democracy assistance presents a particular set of challenges to the field of evaluation. By their very nature, these types of projects and programs are extremely difficult to evaluate. Traditional methods are not always feasible given the complex conditions under which democracy assistance projects and programs take place. The National Endowment for Democracy (NED) is a private, nonprofit organization created in 1983 and funded through an annual congressional appropriation to strengthen democratic institutions around the world through nongovernmental efforts. NED’s grants program provides support to grassroots organizations in more than 80 countries to conduct projects of their own design. The varied political and cultural contexts of NED grantees coupled with the difficulties of attributing programmatic success to a single small grant have led the Endowment to look for innovative methods for measuring the short and long term success of its grantees.  This presentation will discuss NED’s evaluation philosophy and approach and will explore how NED’s evaluation practice differs from others in the democracy assistance field.  

Rebekah Usatin is the Manager for Program Monitoring and Evaluation at the National Endowment for Democracy in Washington, DC where she provides policy guidance on NED’s monitoring and evaluation systems.  Ms. Usatin regularly delivers training and technical assistance to Endowment staff and grantees and is responsible for designing and managing all phases of NED’s independent evaluations. Prior to joining NED, she worked in Montenegro as the evaluation officer for a USAID-funded democracy and governance program. Ms. Usatin speaks French fluently and holds a master’s degree in public administration and international management from the Monterey Institute of International Studies and a bachelor’s degree from Whitman College.

This talk is part of a series on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) funded by Penn’s Provost's Interdisciplinary Seminar Fund, and organized together with the Graduate School of Education, the School of Medicine, and Wharton.

ICT4D Seminar: UNESCO, literacy and educational development: Innovations and new information and communications technologies
Speaker Dr. I.V. Subba Rao
Date May 7, 2013 - May 7, 2013
Time 12:00pm-1:30pm
Location Grad School of Education Room 203
Description

Today, a billion citizens, nearly one-seventh of world population, are not able to read and write and are excluded from the contemporary text-mediated world. This clearly is an unacceptable situation if we want to create an inclusive, sustainable world. UNESCO has, over the last sixty years, consistently tried to be a thought leader in education and development. There is an imperative need to look for innovative solutions, including the creative use of information and communications technologies, to reach the hard to reach and low-literate populations. Both historical trends and new initiatives will be discussed.

 

 

Dr. I.V.Subba Rao, Chief, Literacy and Non-formal education at UNESCO, Paris, is an educationist and developmental administrator who has, over the last three decades, held key leadership positions in India. Dr. Rao has made a significant contribution to India’s literacy efforts and has led important initiatives to improve the quality of schooling and teacher education. He has been closely associated with educational policy making at the national level and policy implementation at the local levels. He has wide ranging experience in the areas of literacy assessment, lifelong learning, non-formal education, open learning, child labor, multi-lingual education, AIDS education and use of ICT in education. Dr. Rao has a PhD in education policy and leadership from the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education.

 

The ICT4D Seminar is supported by the Provost's Interdisciplinary Initiatives Fund, the Annenberg School for Communication, the Graduate School of Education/International Educational Development Program, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Programmatic support is provided by Annenberg's Center for Global Communication Studies.

World Bank - Annenberg Summer Institute in Communication and Governance Reform
Date May 28, 2013 - June 7, 2013
Location University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Description
World Bank - Annenberg
Summer Institute in Communication
and Governance Reform


May 28-June 7, 2013 University of Southern California, Los Angeles
(Application Deadline: February 28th, 2013)
 
The World Bank Institute's Leadership and Governance Practice, the World Bank's External Affairs Operational Communications Department, the Annenberg School for Communication ant the University of Pennsylvania, and the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California are pleased to announce the 2013 Summer Institute in Communication and Governance Reform. The course is primarily designed for strategists and advisers in the public sector and civil society, senior development professionals, and seasoned communication specialists who want to strengthen critical competencies in providing implementation support to change agents and reform leaders in developing countries.

 
The 9.5-day program will equip participants with knowledge about the most recent advances in communication and proven techniques in reform implementation. Participants will develop core competencies essential to bringing about real change, leading to development results in a wider range of sectors.

Participants will acquire critical skills in five key areas:

  • Interpreting governance diagnostics and political economy analyses.
  • Crafting multi-stakeholder collaboration, coalition and network building strategies and tactics to support reform.
  • Providing communication skills that support the implementation of governance reforms.
  • Leveraging social/digital media tools and analytics effectively.
  • Developing communication metrics and applying monitoring and evaluation frameworks relevant to governance reform.

Please Click Here for More Information about the World Bank - Annenberg Summer Institute in Communication and Governance Reform

Public debate 2.0: European soul-searching about the future role of the media
Speaker Dr. Tarlach McGonagle
Date May 29, 2013 - May 29, 2013
Time 12:00-1:30pm
Location Annenberg School Room 300
Description

Many of the issues and problems that have featured prominently in recent and ongoing US discussions about the future of journalism and the media have also been shaping equivalent discussions on the other side of the Atlantic. The European Court of Human Rights has traditionally been a stalwart of freedom of expression. It has, for instance, recognised that journalists and the media should enjoy an elevated level of protection of freedom of expression by virtue of the democracy-enhancing roles typically ascribed to them (eg. “public watchdog”/Fourth Estate; contribution to opinion-forming processes; provision of a forum for discussion of matters of public interest).

The trade-off for this elevated level of freedom of expression has been an expectation of adherence to journalistic ethics and codes of practice (so-called “responsible journalism”). However, in a reconfigured media ecosystem, these traditional principles require rethinking and recalibration in order to reflect the growing number and diversity of (professional and amateur) actors participating in public debate; de- (and sometimes re-)institutionalising trends in the media sector; expanding and diversifying technological capabilities and their impact on (public and interpersonal) communication practices and patterns. Who is a journalist? Who or what are the media? Who else contributes to public debate and how? What kinds of legal liability and ethical responsibility are implicated in respect of each of the different actors?

While the European Court of Human Rights has been left in the slipstream of technological change, it is now beginning to demonstrate an awareness of certain, specific features of the online environment and their relevance for enabling robust public debate. It has also cautiously extended the elevated level of freedom of expression traditionally enjoyed by journalists and the media to non-journalistic/non-media actors. This shift from an institutional/occupational approach to a functional one constitutes important recognition of the valuable contribution non-journalistic/non-media actors can make to public debate.

How can these evolving legal principles be harnessed to create an enabling environment for a version of public debate that is increasingly diversified, crowded, interactive, noisy and technology-dependent? This paper will explore the abovementioned jurisprudential developments, their underlying issues, their interplay and their implications. It will highlight and explain how the Court’s embryonic principles in this area are being translated into policy-making by the Council of Europe, with very mixed results. It will eagerly invite comparative perspectives from the US and elsewhere.

 

Dr. Tarlach McGonagle is a Senior Researcher and Assistant Professor at the Institute for Information Law (IViR), Faculty of Law, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where he is also coordinator of the specialised Information Law Masters Programme. He is an Associate Senior Researcher of the inter-university School of Human Rights Research in the Netherlands.  

His expertise spans a broad range of issues relating to international and European law and policy in three main fields: the media, information and human rights. Recurrent themes in his research include freedom of expression, the rights of persons belonging to minorities and cultural and linguistic rights.

Dr. McGonagle regularly writes expert reports for various branches of the Council of Europe, OSCE and other IGOs and NGOs and is a member of the Editorial Board of the European Audiovisual Observatory. He was also one of the independent experts involved in the drafting - at the invitation of the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities - of a set of international Guidelines on the use of Minority Languages in the Broadcast Media (2003). He was an invited expert speaker at the Thematic Discussion on “Racist Hate Speech” organised by the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination in 2012.

He has published widely on numerous aspects of the right to freedom of expression, international regulation of the media and new media, the rights of persons belonging to minorities, tolerance, human dignity, “hate speech” and various legal aspects of pluralism and diversity. See here for a fuller professional profile and selected publications.

June 2013
2013 Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute
Date June 24, 2013 - July 5, 2013
Location University of Oxford
Description

The Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford (PCMLP) are pleased to invite applications to the 15th annual Annenberg-Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute, to be held from Monday, June 24 to Friday, July 5, 2013 at the University of Oxford.

For the past  fifteen years, the Annenberg- Oxford Media Policy Summer Institute has brought together researchers, academics, and practitioners for two weeks of scholarship on a range of media issues. A partnership between the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School, University of Pennsylvania and the Programme for Comparative Media Law and Policy at the University of Oxford, the program brings together a diverse range of participants from across the world.

The annual summer institute brings together young scholars and regulators for two weeks to discuss important recent trends in technology, international politics and development and its influence on media policy. Participants come from around the world; countries represented at previous summer institutes include Myanmar, Bosnia and Herzegonia, Iran, Kenya, China, Brazil, Egypt, Nigeria, Jordan, Italy, Iran, Colombia, El Salvador, among others.

This year the summer institute seeks, as part of the cohort, researchers and academics (PhD candidates and early career academics, for example), who will come with a research project related to the general subject of the seminar. We welcome applications from emerging scholars and practitioners working on topics such as media and democracy, public service broadcasting, Internet policy and politics, monitoring and evaluation of media development programs, the media’s role in conflict and post-conflict environments, strategic communications, as well as other topics. For full application instructions please visit our Frequently Asked Questions page. The application is available here.  Please note, applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until April 1, 2013.

July 2013
CEU Summer University Course: Internet Governance, Civil Society and Public Policy Advocacy
Date July 8, 2013 - July 19, 2013
Location Central European University, Budapest, Hungary
Description

This intensive summer course is designed to help both researchers and activists gain new insights into the role which civil society can play in advocating for a free and open internet, and will highlight the potential of technology and online tools for mobilizing and organizing constituencies and for enhancing the security and privacy of advocates.

Participants will be exposed to a wide range of practical and theoretical views related to communication policy advocacy and online tools and tactics, and how to integrate research into communication policy advocacy. The course will be run as a combination of conceptual and research-oriented sessions, in addition to hands-on work in developing advocacy campaigns and the latest developments in online tools for advocacy, security and privacy. The course will feature a range of lectures, group discussions, hands-on practicums, time built in to the schedule for group work, as well as field trips within Budapest to meet with organizations engaged with work in this field, including multimedia innovation labs and hacktivist spaces.

In addition, the 2013 course will focus heavily on advocacy training, especially on offering interesting and timely skills based opportunities to learn about the latest techniques in video advocacy, data visualization, infographics, social media campaigns, writing of opinion editorials, and other key tools needed to run effective public policy campaigns.

As in years past, the course will also feature timely discussion on how internet law and policy affect media development, democratization, and rule of law development in developing and transitioning countries. In this respect, the course will feature in-depth, comparative discussion on matters of internet governance and regulation featuring local, regional and international perspectives. The core focus of the course will be on developing local, in-country capacity for civil society organizations and academics who want to focus on internet governance issues. That said, there will be time allocated to discuss global and international trends and actors, i.e. the Internet Governance Forum, the International Telecommuncations Union involvement and interest in internet regulation, entitles like the Global Network Initiative.

This course is intended for media policy advocates, PhD students, advanced MA students, activists, bloggers, policy makers, media development professionals (drawing from government, civil society/NGOs, foundations), journalists and other media practitioners with a demonstrated interest in new media and technology and communication policy advocacy.

September 2013
CGCS Visiting Scholar Lunchtime Discussion
Date September 30, 2013 - September 30, 2013
Time 1:00
Location Annenberg School, Room 300
Description

CGCS welcomes nine visiting scholars for the semester, who will be working on their own research, taking classes, and engaging with the Annenberg community.

This informal discussion  is a chance to meet the CGCS visiting scholars, learn about their research interests and areas for potential collaborations.

Lunch will be served. 

October 2013
Digital Methods, Ethical Challenges
Date October 10, 2013 - October 10, 2013
Time 9:00am- 4:00pm
Location Annenberg School, Room 500
Ticketing RSVP to ahighbloom@asc.upenn.edu
Description

Digital Methods, Ethical Challenges 

A symposium hosted by the Center for Global Communication Studies

and the Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication

Annenberg School for Communication Room 500

October 10, 2013

9am-4:00pm

9:00-9:15 Welcome 

9:30-10:30 Panel 1: Digital Culture Transformations  

Hector Postigo, Temple University & Microsoft Research: Participatory observation, participatory culture and interventionist research: When should we strive to be more than observers in digital culture? 

Elizabeth Buchanan, University of Wisconsin-Stout: Vulnerable by association: Secondary subjects and representation through social media

Moderator: John Jackson, Annenberg School for Communication

10:30-10:45 Coffee break

11:00-12:30 Panel 2: University Auspices and Vulnerable Populations

John Kelly, Harvard University & Morningside Analytics: Knowing too much: Academic openness vs. the security of vulnerable actors

Katy Pearce, University of Washington: Maintaining scholarly distance, developing trust, and protecting sources online and offline in an authoritarian context

Randall Sell, Drexel University: Understanding gay men’s health: Evolving methods and challenges

Moderator: Guobin Yang, Annenberg School for Communication

12:30- 1:15 Lunch

1:30-3:00 Panel 3: Activism, Advocacy and National Security: Justifying Separate Sets of Standards?

Kristene Unsworth, Drexel University: We must know everything and nothing should slip by: National security and the need to know

Rebecca MacKinnon, New America Foundation & Center for Global Communication Studies: Security risks for researchers: Lessons from journalists and activists

Christopher Wilson, the Engine Room: Ethics and research in international advocacy: A preliminary mapping of needs and resources

Moderator: Sandra Gonzales-Bailon, Annenberg School for Communication

3:00-3:15 Coffee break

3:15-4:00 Open discussion & wrap-up

Click here to view abstracts and panelist bios. 

Scholarship After Snowden
Date October 17, 2013 - October 17, 2013
Time 4:30pm-7:30pm
Location Gittis Hall 214, Haaga Classroom, 3501 Sansom Street
Description

Edward Snowden’s decision to release reams of information about US and other government surveillance programs has touched off a series of global debates about the appropriate balance between national security, civil liberties, right to privacy, the relationship between government and the private sector, and the ethical responsibilities of businesses.  While editorial pages and think tanks have weighed in on these topics in the months since Snowden’s revelations have come to light, the academy has a unique perspective, and even responsibility, to consider the implications of the rise of pervasive digital surveillance for a range of disciplines that intersect with these issues.  

This 3-hour mini-conference will bring together experts from different fields to discuss what these recent revelations and debates on surveillance mean for a range of disciplines - in terms of scholarship, teaching, and professional practice - in the fields of engineering, law, business, communications, and the social sciences.  In particular, the conference participants will explore what kinds of future research agendas should be developed in light of ever expanding surveillance capabilities and the concomitant unease that these programs engender.  In addition, participants will be asked to consider the role of higher education in preparing the next generation of leaders to grapple with these fundamental issues in service of the public interest.

RSVP requested but not required here: 

https://www.law.upenn.edu/newsevents/calendar.php#event_id/46830/view/event

Co-Sponsored by Penn Law and the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication.  Made possible by the Provost’s Global Engagement Fund.

 

                                                                AGENDA

Welcome

Monroe Price, Director, Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS), Annenberg School for Communication

Amy Gadsden, Associate Dean and Director of International Programs, University of Pennsylvania Law School

 

Keynote: Our collective responsibility 

Bruce Schneier, Security expert and writer

 

Panel 1: What are the harms and how can the academy contribute to solutions?

Joseph Turow, Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, Annenberg

Cynthia Wong, Senior Researcher, Internet and Human Rights, Human Rights Watch

Lauren Steinfeld, Senior Advisor for Privacy and Compliance, University of Pennsylvania

Ben Wagner, Internet Policy Observatory Post-Doctoral Fellow, CGCS, Annenberg

 

Panel 2: Preparing future professionals for this brave new world.

Michael Samway, Former Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, Yahoo! 

Christopher Yoo, John H. Chestnut Professor of Law, Communication, and Computer and Information Science; Director, Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition, Penn Law

Andrea Matwyshyn, Assistant Professor, Legal Studies and Business Ethics Department, Wharton

Nien-he Hsieh, Associate Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School 

Moderator and discussion facilitator: Rebecca MacKinnon, Senior Research Fellow, New America Foundation, Penn Law Adjunct Lecturer, CGCS Affiliate.

 

Discussion will be followed by a reception.

 

 

Models of Media Development: A Comparative Look at How Academics, NGOs, and Donors Assess the Contribution and Impact of Media in International Development
Date October 19, 2013 - October 19, 2013
Time 8:00- 9:30am
Location Panel Session 700 in Fairchild East at the Hilton Washington 1919 Connecticut Ave, Washington, DC
Description

The 2013 Annual Conference of the American Evaluation Association Presents Models of Media Development: A Comparative Look at How Academics, NGOs, and Donors Assess the Contribution and Impact of Media in International Development

This panel will explore some of the methods that scholars and implementers in the media development and media- for - developmetn fields are using to evalute the impact of projects in the 21st century. Specifically, the panelists will focus on the importance of tying design and evaluation to media theory, so that project learning contributes to overall understanding of the role of media in development. Focus groups, interviews, surveys, and other methodologies that can help us create evaluations that add to knowledge and evidence on media theory will be explore. The selection of indicators that can best facilitate these goals will also be discussed.

Susan Abbott, Senior Program Development Adviser, Internews: In Search of Impact: Updating Media Development's M&E Framework for 21st Century Needs and Practices

Leon Morse, Deputy Director, Media, Technology and Civil Society, IREX

: Evaluating Media Systems: IREX’s Media Sustainability Index

Lauren Kogen, Ph.D., Center for Global Communication Studies, University of Pennsylvania: 

Incorporating Media Theory into Project Design and Evaluation: Two Case Studies

Kavita Abraham, Director of Research and Learning, BBC Media Action: Using Media to Promote Health, Governance, and Resilience: A Cross-National Evaluation

Moderated by Anne Bennett, Executive Director, Hirondelle USA

Digital Dissent and the Egyptian Revolution: Social Media and the Challenge to Authoritarian Rule
Speaker David Faris
Date October 23, 2013 - October 23, 2013
Time 12:30pm
Location Annenberg School, room 500
Description

During the Arab uprisings of early 2011, which saw the overthrow of Zine el-Abadine Ben Ali in Tunisia and Hosni Mubarak in Egypt, the role of digital media and social networking tools was widely reported. This was also recognized by the very authorities fighting against popular pressure for change, and the Egyptian government's attempt to block internet and mobile phone access in January 2011 demonstrated the extent to which it was seen as powerful and potentially subversive tool. What is yet to be examined is the local context that allowed digital media to play this role: Egypt, for example, a history of online activism laid important ground work for the scenes in Tahrir Square. Here, David Faris argues that it was circumstances particular to Egypt, more than the 'spark' from Tunisia, that allowed the revolution to take off: namely blogging and digital activism stretching back into the 1990s, combined with sustained and numerous protest movements and an independent press. Dissent and Revolution in a Digital Age tracks the rocky path taken by Egyptian bloggers operating in Mubarak's authoritarian regime to illustrate how the state monopoly on information was eroded, making space for dissent and digital activism.

David Faris is a lecturer and researcher in the department of Political Science and Public Administration Roosevelt University and director of the interdisciplinary International Studies program. He spent a year and a half in Cairo, Egypt, between 2006 and 2011 interviewing activists, journalists and students for his recently published book, Dissent and Revolution in a Digital Age: Social Media, Blogging and Activism in Egypt.  His academic work has been published in Middle East Policy, Arab Media & Society  and Politique Eranger, and has published op-eds in NPR.org, the Christian Science Monitor, the Daily News Egypt, the Philadelphia Citypaper, the  Philadelphia Inquirer, and more.

This event is co-hosted by the Center for Global Communication Studies and the Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication.

Lunch willl be served at 12:15.

Iran: Art and Discourse
Date October 26, 2013 - October 26, 2013
Time 10:00am - 6:00pm
Location Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, New York City
Description

 

 

AGENDA

 

10:00- 11:30 am      Welcome and Introductory Remarks

Melissa Chiu, Director of Asia Society; Monroe Price, Director of Center for Global Communication, University of Pennsylvania; and Sandra Skurvida, Symposium Convener

Keynote: Hamid Keshmirshekan (Oxford University), Art Practice and Dissemination in Contemporary Iran: Discourses and Mechanisms

 

Break

 

11:30 am - 1:00 pm      Panel on the Discursive Text:

Shiva Balaghi (Brown University), Exhibiting the West in Iran and Iran in the West

Babak Elahi (Rochester Institute of Technology), The Critic as Activist: Cultural Commentary in Iran's Digital Transnational Aesthetic Sphere

Sohrab Mahdavi (Tehran Avenue), Artistic Statement: An Instrument to Get Closer or Become Ethereal

 

1:00- 2:00 Lunch break

 

2:00 - 3:30 pm     Panel on the Curatorial:

Fereshteh Daftari (Independent Curator, NYC, co-curator of Iran Modern), Introducing Modern and Contemporary Art by Iranian Artists: A Curatorial Perspective

Azar Mahmoudian (Independent Curator, Tehran), Politics of Display: Reflections on International Exhibitions of Iranian Art

Anna Vanzan (University of Milan), Posht-e Pardeh, Behind the Painting: Women Gallerists in Contemporary Iran

 

Break

 

4:00 - 6:00 pm     Panel on Art Praxis:

Roxanne Varzi (University of California, Irvine), Facing the Future: The Artistic and Diasporic Afterlife of the Iran-Iraq War

Slavs and TatarsThe Transliterative Tease 

Sohrab Kashani (Artist and Producer, Tehran), Alternative(s) in Tehran: Art Space and Practices 

 

Endnote: Hamid Dabashi (Columbia University)

 

6:00 - 7:00 pm Reception at Lion Court, Asia Society

 

To rsvp, please email ahighbloom@asc.upenn.edu.

The View from Vienna: The OSCE and Media Law and Practice in Russia
Speaker Andrei Richter, Director of the Office of the Representative on Freedom of the Media of the OSCE
Date October 30, 2013 - October 30, 2013
Time Noon
Location Penn Law School, 3501 Sansom Street, Silverman 240A
Description

Andrei Richter, the Director of the Office of the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media will disucss the operation of this office in the context of the international debate on Internet Freedom and the state of online media and online media law in Russia today.

Richter has university degrees in law, foreign languages, and a doctorate degree in journalism. Richter is commissioner of the International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) and former co-chair of the Law Section of the International Association for Media and Communication Research (IAMCR). He sits on editorial boards of a number of international journals on communications and the media and has authored numerous publications on media law in Russian, English, Armenian, Azeri, Tajik, Ukarainian, Servian, Slovak, German, and French, including the only standard media law textbook for journalism students of Russian colleges and universities (2002, 2009), a textbook on international standards of media regulation (2011), and a book on censorship and freedom of the media in post- Soviet countries published by UNESCO in English (2007).

November 2013
The Role of ICT Companies in Preventing the Spread of Hate Speech: A Case Study of the 2013 Kenyan Presidential Elections
Speaker Lucy Purdon, ICT Researcher at Institute for Human Rights and Business
Date November 7, 2013 - November 7, 2013
Time 12:00pm
Location Annenberg School Room 300
Description

The question of how to regulate certain forms of speech in the digital realm, so-called “hate speech” in particular, is an on-going controversy that affects every country in the world differently. The lack of an internationally agreed definition of “hate speech” has made it difficult to clarify its meaning and how it should be dealt with in the digital realm, which can be problematic for Information and Communication (ICT) companies when deciding whether content should be removed from the web or blocked in accordance with the law. Companies are therefore often left to take these decisions based on their own terms of services, or are asked to do so by authorities such as courts or governments, and in some cases, interest groups. A common criticism levelled at companies is that they either do not remove enough content or they block too much content, and it is not an easy task to draw the line on where freedom of expression ends and legitimate restrictions begin.
 
As part of the Digital Dangers project, the Institute for Human Rights and Business (IHRB) has produced a report delving further into the issue, looking at the example of the 2013 Presidential Elections in Kenya and the actions of a local mobile operator, Safaricom, to mitigate the spread of hate speech via their SMS network during this time.
 
The disputed 2007 Presidential election in Kenya resulted in an outbreak of post-election violence that left over 1,000 people dead and over 600,000 people displaced. The post-election enquiries reported that SMS messages and blogs were one of the triggers of the post-election violence, exploiting tensions between ethnic communities (or ‘tribes’) and inciting violence. In the run up to the 2013 elections, there were concerns of another outbreak of violence; new, untested laws; fears over the potential of SMS to simultaneously send messages that incite violence; a government that hadn’t clarified how it intended to enforce the law; and an expectation from the public—at least civil society—that some action was needed to curb violence. There was also the added factor that there were thousands more social media users in 2013 than in 2007.
 
Lucy Purdon will present some of the findings of the report and recommendations and lead a discussion on how companies can use the example of Kenya to help them make decisions in similar situations of social tension, where accusations of hate speech arise and companies are expected to block or remove content, so they act in a way that is consistent with the corporate responsibility to respect human rights, in particular freedom of expression and privacy, as outlined in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

Lucy joined IHRB as an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) researcher on the EC Human Rights Sector Guidance project. She manages IHRB's ICT Programme and works mainly on issues of freedom of expression and privacy in ICTs. Lucy graduated with an MA in Human Rights from The Institute of Commonwealth Studies (ICwS), University of London. Her thesis, 'Privatising Dissent', applied the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights to the ICT sector. Prior to this, Lucy was a documentary producer/director and ran film-making courses for young offenders in the UK. She also holds a First Class BA (Hons) in Film and Video from London College of Communications, University of the Arts. 

Research at BBC Media Action: Putting our audience first
Speaker Kavita Abraham-Dowsing, Director of Research and Learning; Anna Godfrey, Head of Research Programmes; Zoe Fortune, Senior Research Manager
Date November 8, 2013 - November 8, 2013
Time 12:00
Location Annenberg School Room 500
Description
Lunch Talk: 

12:00pm to 1:30pm

Annenberg School for Communication

3620 Walnut St., Room 500

Lunch will be served at 11:45  

 

Afternoon Workshop:

2pm to 4pm

Annenberg Public Policy Center

202 South 36th St., 2nd Floor Conference Room 

RSVP REQUIRED: ahighbloom@asc.upenn.edu

    

BBC Media Action is currently delivering a five year research programme across 14 countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The research is designed to inform and evaluate media and communications projects aiming to support health, governance and resilience outcomes.

In this presentation, the opportunities and challenges presented by the multi method research strategy will be shared alongside some initial insights from the first 2 years of the programme.

The presentation will also cover reflections on: bridging theory and practice, the importance of research partnerships, building research capacity in developing countries and initial work on research innovations such as using field experiments to assess the impact of media interventions.  Finally the complexity of creating a live public access data portal will be addressed.

BBC Media Action’s work
BBC Media Action, the international development organisation of the BBC (British Broadcasting Corporation), uses the power of media and communication to support people to shape their own lives. Working with broadcasters, governments, other organisations and donors, we provide information and stimulate positive change in the areas of governance, health, resilience and humanitarian response. We work in more than 20 countries across Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Europe. All of BBC Media Action's projects respond to communication needs in the countries in which we work, and in particular the concerns and opinions of audiences. Research is therefore central to the way that we plan and deliver our work. BBC Media Action uses research to inform and evaluate its work. For more information on our work, please visit www.bbcmediaaction.org.

 

This talk is part of a series on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) funded by Penn’s Provost's Interdisciplinary Seminar Fund, and organized together with the Graduate School of Education, the School of Medicine, and Wharton.

From the North Pole to WWW: Social and political construction of cyberspace and Internet regulation in Russia
Speaker Gregory Asmolov, London School of Economics
Date November 11, 2013 - November 11, 2013
Time 1:00pm
Location Annenberg School Room 500
Description

The talk suggests exploring Internet regulation beyond specific measures suggested by government, such as new legislation or law enforcement that seeks to restrict Internet freedom. Relying on the Russian case study, it describes the major social and political constructions of cyberspace that are adopted and promoted by Russian authorities, and argues that the strategies of construction are a key factor for development of regimes of Internet regulation. The talk describes the models of Internet construction that can be identified in Russian Internet policy on national (internal) and international (external) levels.

It argues that on the national level, Internet control is constructed as a form of protection of citizens from a variety of social threats. While the authorities have the capacity to force various types of regulation, the most significant forms of Internet freedom restriction take place in an environment where these efforts are supported by public opinion and considered as legitimate by a majority of citizens. On the international level, the major efforts are focused in order to apply the traditional geospatial notion of space to the cyberspace. The latter argument is presented through comparative analysis of Russian position in regard to Internet governance and the regulation of the Arctic region.

Gregory Asmolov is a PhD student in New Media, Innovation, and Literacy at the London School of Economics media department. His research focuses on the development of online political institutions and ICT based models of governance in crisis situations. Previously, he worked as a consultant on information technology, new media, and social media projects for The World Bank, American Councils for International Education, and Internews, and was a research assistant at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Additionally, Gregory worked as a journalist for major Russian daily newspapers Kommersatn and Novaya Gazeta and served as a news editor for and analyst for Israeli TV

Evaluation Cultures: Sense-Making in Complex Times
Speaker Penny Hawkins
Date November 22, 2013 - November 22, 2013
Time 12:00pm
Location Annenberg School, Room 500
Description

The field of evaluation includes a diversity of professionals representing different national, academic, public and private sectors, as well as personal preferences. Evaluation practices are also influenced by national political cultures, organisational practices and cultural values. Hence a range of views contributes to vigorous ongoing debates about best practices. Rapid changes in the information landscape add to the mix, creating new challenges and emergent evaluation forms and approaches. What are the implications for the development of evaluation so this professional field is fit for the future?

Penny Hawkins is Head of Evaluation at the Department for International Development (DFID).  She was previously at the Rockefeller Foundation based in New York and prior to this was Head of Evaluation for New Zealand Aid at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. For the past eleven years, Penny has been an instructor at the International Programme for Development Evaluation (IPDET) at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.  She has run workshops, seminars and lectures on various evaluation topics in Africa, Asia, the Pacific, Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand. Penny is the author of a number of evaluation publications including the recently published book: Evaluation Cultures: Sense-making in Complex Times which she co-edited with Professor Jean-Claude Barbier. She is a former President of the Australasian Evaluation Society (AES), a founding board member of the International Organisation for Cooperation in Evaluation (IOCE), and a member of the International Evaluation Research Group (INTEVAL). In 2007, she received the Australasian Evaluation Society Award for Outstanding Contribution to Evaluation and in 2009 was made a Fellow of the Society.

 

This talk is part of a series on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) funded by Penn’s Provost's Interdisciplinary Seminar Fund, and organized together with the Graduate School of Education, the School of Medicine, and Wharton.

Dangerous Speech and New Methods of Prevention
Speaker Susan Benesch
Date November 25, 2013 - November 25, 2013
Time 1:00-2:30pm
Location Annenberg School Room 300
Description

Susan Benesch will describe ongoing research on a subset of hate speech, “dangerous speech,” that has a special capacity to catalyze violence. Her framework to identify such speech was adapted for use in the Umati project – in which Kenyan monitors scrubbed their country’s online spaces, for hate speech and dangerous speech. They assembled a remarkable dataset, which was used in new experiments to diminish the force (impact on audiences) of dangerous speech. The talk will include those, and similar approaches for use in other normative climates, including social networking platforms.

 

 

Susan Benesch, a Faculty Associate of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University, teaches human rights at American University’s School of International Service. She also serves as Edith Everett Genocide Prevention Fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She founded the Dangerous Speech Project in 2010, to find new ways of preventing mass violence.

December 2013
Bits and Atoms: Information and Communication Technology in Areas of Limited Statehood
Speaker Steven Livingston
Date December 9, 2013 - December 9, 2013
Time 1:00pm
Location Annenberg School Room 500
Description

Bits and Atoms (co- edited by Steven Livingston and  Gregor Walter-Drop) looks at the role of information and communication technologies in enabling local communities and NGOs working in areas of limited statehood -- places where the state's capacity at service provision and application of legitimate force is limited or non-existent.  Put another way, the contributors to the book consider the extent to which digitally enabled collective action in areas of limited statehood constitute an alternative governance modality.  How are various technologies being leveraged by NGOs and community groups, and even by weak state institutions themselves, to strengthen and expand governance capacities?  

Steven Livingston is Professor of Media and Public Affairs and International Affairs at The George Washington University with appointments in the School of Media and Public Affairs (SMPA) and the Elliott School of International Affairs (ESIA). Livingston's principal research interests center on digitally enabled collective action – or governance – in areas of limited statehood, places where the state is weak and ineffectual.  He also continues to research questions relating to news coverage of political conflict. His interests have led to extended stays in Northern Ireland, Russia, Eastern and Central Europe, the Middle East, and East and Central Africa.  He went to Iraq twice in 2008 and once in 2009.  At the invitation of the Canadian government and NATO, he was in Afghanistan in 2009 and again in 2010.  He has advised a wide range of governments, the U.N. and NGOs on matters relating to governance capacity building, media and media relations, technology, and public opinion dynamics.  Among other publications, Livingston has written Clarifying the CNN Effect (a monograph published by Harvard University in 1996) and The Terrorism Spectacle (Westview Press, 1994); When the Press Fails: Political Power and the News Media from Iraq to Katrina (W. Lance Bennett and Regina Lawrence, co-authors) (University of Chicago Press, 2007); and Bits and Atoms: Information and Communication Technology in Areas of Limited Statehood (with Gregor Walter-Drop) (Oxford University Press in 2013).  In 2011, he published Africa’s New Emerging InfoSystems: New Pathways to Security and Stability (NDU Press 2011).  A follow-up study, Africa’s Information Revolution: Implications for Crime, Policing, and Citizen Security was published in 2013. Both studies were supported by the Africa Center for Strategic Studies and based on extensive field research in several African countries.  He is currently planning a book with Patrick Meier that examines digitally enabled collective action and economic development. 

When Expectations for Results Come Too Early: Innovative Measures and Methods
Speaker Julia Coffman
Date December 11, 2013 - December 11, 2013
Time 12:00
Location Annenberg School Room 300
Description

Many of us work on complex and entrenched problems that do not have quick solutions or predictable timeframes. Our strategies to address them are necessarily long-term, but our funding often comes with short timeframes and the expectation for quick results. This is a particular challenge for projects that involve communications or advocacy, where even identifying what short-term results should look like can be a challenge. This session will offer ideas about what it is meaningful to measure in the short-term, particularly when communications are involved. It will emphasize measures that not only demonstrate progress, but also contribute to ongoing strategic learning and adaptation. The session also will focus on innovative and cost-effective methods for capturing those measures, and provide real-life examples of how they have been used both domestically and internationally. 

Julia Coffman is founder and director of the Center for Evaluation Innovation based in Washington, D.C.. The Center is dedicated to building the field of evaluation in areas that are hard to measure. Julia has more than 20 years of experience as an evaluator, and specializes in evaluation that supports strategic learning, particularly for advocacy, public policy and systems change efforts. She is also co-director of the Evaluation Roundtable, a network of foundation evaluation leaders that seeks to improve how foundations learn about the results of their grantmaking and increase the impact of their work. For 15 years Coffman worked with the Harvard Family Research Project, a research and evaluation organization at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Coffman led HFRP’s evaluation work for over a decade, which included evaluating foundation and nonprofit initiatives and publishing The Evaluation Exchange, a nationally renowned periodical on emerging evaluation strategies and issues.

 

This talk is part of a series on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) funded by Penn’s Provost's Interdisciplinary Seminar Fund, and organized together with the Graduate School of Education, the School of Medicine, and Wharton.

January 2014
Internet Governance and Free Expression in Latin America: A Panel Discussion with Experts
Speaker with Eduardo Bertoni (Center for Studies on Freedom of Expression and Access to Information), Carolina Rossini (New America Foundation), Marcel Leonardi (Google Brazil), and Erika Watanabe Patriota (Permanent Mission of Brazil to the United Nations)
Date January 22, 2014 - January 22, 2014
Time 7:00-8:30pm
Location Cardozo Law School, 55 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY
Description

Internet Governance and Free Expression in Latin America: A Panel Discussion with Experts

As part of the Price Media Law Moot Court Americas Regional Round

Against the background of discussions about the role of the press in Latin America, including issues of regulation and free expression in Argentina, Venezuela, Ecuador and elsewhere, this Panel will focus on emerging attitudes toward Internet Governance in Latin America. Panelists will analyze and discuss the most recent regional shifts in narratives and policymaking with regard to privacy, free expression, and the Internet. This seminar will also focus on the upcoming international summit to be hosted in Brazil that will bring government, industry, academia, and leaders to discuss these issues. The conversation will also focus on the Marco Civil da Internet (which may or not be enacted into law), its implications, as well as other changing approaches to regulation of the internet. These and other issues will be discussed such as: How is civil society engaging with questions of regulation?  How are advocates of different models of Internet Governance affecting debate and discussion? How is the Internet and its governance being framed in public discussion and how is that being realized in public opinion? How do the debates over internet governance relate to the hemispheric discussions of free expression and free press generally?

 

About the Price Media Law Moot Court

The Americas Regional Round of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition is an international moot court program sponsored by the University of Oxford’s Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, and the Annenberg School of Communication. The competition provides a regional forum for dialogue and debate on freedom of expression and media law issues of global importance. This year’s case focuses on privacy, surveillance, and data security, issues that are very much relevant to current events as well as the future of international and national media law. 

 

Snowden, Surveillance, and the Pentagon Papers
Speaker with Adam Liptak and David Rudenstine
Date January 23, 2014 - January 23, 2014
Time 7:00-8:30pm
Location Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, 55 5th Avenue, New York, NY
Description

Snowden, Surveillance, and the Pentagon Papers

As part of the Price Media Law Moot Court Americas Regional Round

The debate over how to characterize Edward Snowden continues to haunt American political discussion. Should he be prosecuted as a traitor or venerated as an admirable whistle blower or both? Has Snowden seriously injured the nation's security or disclosed unlawful government conduct or both? With the benefit of time, how will Snowden and the NSA scandal be seen by the american voter, opinion leaders, legal scholars and historians? The Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, and the Price Media Law Moot Court Program invite you to join this discussion, bringing together the nationally prominent New York Times Supreme Court correspondent, Adam Liptak, and the preeminent scholar on the pentagon papers case, Professor David Rudenstine. Together they will canvas ways of thinking about Snowden, disclosure and the history and future of surveillance in America.

About the Price Media Law Moot Court

The Americas Regional Round of the Price Media Law Moot Court Competition is an international moot court program sponsored by the University of Oxford’s Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy, the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, and the Annenberg School of Communication. The competition provides a regional forum for dialogue and debate on freedom of expression and media law issues of global importance. This year’s case focuses on privacy, surveillance, and data security, issues that are very much relevant to current events as well as the future of international and national media law.

CGCS Visiting Scholar Welcome Event and Informal Discussion
Date January 30, 2014 - January 30, 2014
Time 12:00pm
Location Annenberg School, Room 300
Description

Please join us to welcome CGCS's visiting scholars to the Annenberg community and engage in an informal discussion. The scholars will be presenting their research interests, areas for potential collaborations, and pertinent media policy issues relevant to their regions and areas of expertise.

Comparing National Regulatory Authorities Across Democracies with Adriana Mutu, Ph.D. Candidate in Political Science, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain.

Debate on cross media ownership in India: challenges and the way forward with Suruchi Mazumdar, Ph.D. Candidate in Communication Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

Media Regulation from a Constitutional Perspective: Role for Government? with Valentin Thury Cornejo, Researcher, Argentine National Council for Scientific and Technical Research.

February 2014
The Global War for Internet Governance
Speaker Laura DeNardis
Date February 12, 2014 - February 12, 2014
Time 12:00pm
Location Annenberg School, Room 500
Description

Internet governance conflicts are the new spaces where political and economic power is unfolding in the 21st century. Technologies of Internet governance increasingly mediate freedom of expression and individual privacy. They are entangled with national security and global commerce. The distributed nature of Internet governance technologies is shifting historic control over these public interest areas from sovereign nation-states to private ordering and new global institutions. The term "Internet governance" conjures up a host of global controversies such as the prolonged Internet outage in Syria during political turmoil or Google's decision not to acquiesce to U.S. government requests to remove an incendiary political video from YouTube. It invokes narratives about the United Nations "taking over" the Internet, NSA surveillance revelations, cybersecurity concerns about denial of service attacks, and the mercurial privacy policies of social media companies. These issues exist only at the surface of a technologically concealed and institutionally complex ecosystem of governance that is generally out of public view. This talk explains how the Internet is currently governed, particularly through the sinews of power that exist in technical architecture and new global institutions, and presents several brewing Internet governance controversies that will affect the future of economic and expressive liberty.

Dr. Laura DeNardis is an author, Internet governance scholar, and a Professor in the School of Communication at American University. Her books include The Global War for Internet Governance (Yale University Press 2014); Opening Standards: The Global Politics of Interoperability (MIT Press 2011); Protocol Politics: The Globalization of Internet Governance (MIT Press 2009); and Information Technology in Theory (Thompson 2007, co-authored with Pelin Aksoy)She is an affiliated fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School and served as its Executive Director from 2008-2011. She is also currently a Senior Fellow of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), a co-founder and co-series editor of the MIT Press Information Society book series, and the Vice-Chair of the Global Internet Governance Academic Network. DeNardis holds an AB in Engineering Science from Dartmouth College, an MEng from Cornell University, a PhD in Science and Technology Studies from Virginia Tech, and was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from Yale Law School.

Projecting the Family-Nation Globally: A (Re)Analysis of CCTV's Spring Festival Gala
Speaker Zhongdang Pan, Professor of Communication Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date February 20, 2014 - February 20, 2014
Time 12:00pm
Location Annenberg School, Room 500
Description

Constancy and Change in Freedom of Expression Discourse
Speaker Monroe Price
Date February 21, 2014 - February 21, 2014
Time 12:00pm
Location Annenberg School, Room 500
Description

This talk will be an opportunity for me to explore certain concepts that have preoccupied me in recent years in thinking about the organization and regulation of expression (particularly across borders).  While there’s nothing particularly new in organized efforts to penetrate boundaries and seek to change mind sets in near and distant audiences, new technologies, new geopolitical arrangements and sharpened legal concepts give these strategic efforts added power.

Religions, NGOs, corporations, insurgent organizations and resourceful states deploy media to accomplish very ambitious objectives—proselytizing for competing beliefs in the divine, proselytizing for increased consumerism, or bidding for loyalties among China, Russia, Europe, the US and others.  All this sets up an interesting environment for the rethinking of speech and society. I’ll discuss how these developments affect what might be called the institutional foundations of free expression and patterns of government and non-government response.

March 2014
The Third Man Theme Revisited: Foreign Policies of the Internet in a time of Surveillance and Disclosure
Date March 30, 2014 - April 1, 2014
Description

The Third Man Theme Revisited: Foreign Policies of the Internet in a time of Surveillance and Disclosure

Milton Wolf Seminar

Vienna, Austria, March 30 – April 1, 2014

This is the fifth year in a row that the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication is co-organizing the Milton Wolf Seminar on Media and Diplomacy with the Diplomatic Academy, Vienna and the American Austrian Foundation.

About the 2014 Milton Wolf Seminar

Filmed on location in 1948 in the post-World War II rubble of Vienna, the Third Man highlighted the classic Cold War themes of espionage, surveillance and visibility. Vienna also provides the setting for the 2014 Milton Wolf Seminar, which will examine the resurgence of these themes in contemporary international relations and journalism.

Rather than looking backward, the 2014 Milton Wolf Seminar will look forward, exploring a range of potential diplomatic and regulatory solutions to evolving issues of surveillance and disclosure, or what we call foreign policies of the Internet. Discussions will focus particularly on how non-Western countries are developing their own Internet foreign policy strategies and how these are shaping the evolving global Internet. Panels will explore the role of diplomats, international organizations, the private sector, civil society and the press in influencing internet governance.

In order to encourage an open exchange of ideas, seminar attendance is limited only to invited participants and students. Emerging scholars currently completing a PhD or post doctoral program related to the seminar themes are encouraged to apply for the 2014 Emerging Scholars Program.

An overview of this year’s seminar is included here. More information about previous Milton Wolf Seminars can be found here and on our Facebook Page.

For more information, please visit our website or contact Amelia Arsenault.

May 2103
Call for Internet Policy Observatory Post-Doctoral Fellowship or Scholar in Residence
Event/Type Application Open
Date May 23, 2103 - June 21, 2013
Description

The Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania is currently soliciting applications for the Internet Policy Observatory Post Doctoral Fellowship or Scholar in Residence at the Center for Global Communication Studies.  The Post Doctoral Fellow will help develop and manage existing research programs surrounding the Internet Policy Observatory, and develop his/her own independent related research agenda in the area of global internet policy.

Annenberg’s Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS) is a leader in international education and training in comparative media law and policy. The Center's research and policy work addresses issues of media regulation, media and democracy, measuring and evaluation of media development programs, public service broadcasting, and the media's role in conflict and post-conflict environments.

The Internet Policy Observatory is a multi-component project with a collaborative network and the goal of assessing incipient Internet policy and governance shifts in key national fora where restrictive approaches are being considered.

  • The evolution of mechanisms and processes that affect domestic Internet policy;
  • The legal, political, economic, and social factors (domestic and international) that influence the implementation or non-implementation of such policies;
  • The relationship between national efforts and international policy formations;
  • The role of civil society in domestic Internet policy processes and control; and
  • The role of public opinion as a mode of determining a “demand side” for useful Internet policy developments.

Applicants should hold postgraduate qualifications at PhD level or equivalent in a field related to internet policy studies, law or policy, communication,  media/cultural studies.  Applicants should possess a track record of publishing in high quality international journals or other appropriate refereed publications, as well as teaching experience.  Experience in research proposal development and implementation of research projects involving both quantitative and qualitative methodologies is an required.  This one-year position comes with a stipend of $40,000 to $50,000 (depending on years of prior experience), health insurance, $2,000 in travel and research support, office space with computer and telephone, and full access to the Penn library system. Annenberg welcomes domestic and international applicants.  If applicant has not completed graduate studies in English, the University of Pennsylvania’s TOEFL standards apply (http://www.sas.upenn.edu/lps/node/452).  The fellowship is a one year term. To apply, please send an application package with CV, statement of interest, and a brief (2-3 page) proposal for a research project related to the study of global internet policy to bsmith@asc.upenn.edu.  Research projects may expand existing research or propose new lines of inquiry. Please contact the same email address if you have any questions.  Application deadline: June 21, 2013 with a start date tentatively (flexible) August  15, 2013.